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Overview

This volume is part of a six-part Norton Lecture that Bernstein gave to Harvard University students. In 1971 composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein became the Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University. This post was held by other talents Igor Stravinsky, Aaron Copland and E.E. Cummings. In this video Bernstein compares the structures of music and speech and then discusses their multiple transformations. He uses Mozart's "Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K550" as example to support his lecture. ...
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Overview

This volume is part of a six-part Norton Lecture that Bernstein gave to Harvard University students. In 1971 composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein became the Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University. This post was held by other talents Igor Stravinsky, Aaron Copland and E.E. Cummings. In this video Bernstein compares the structures of music and speech and then discusses their multiple transformations. He uses Mozart's "Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K550" as example to support his lecture. Leonard Bernstein displays his talents as a classical musical genius, composer and teacher, and based much of his lecture on the linguistic theories of Noam Chomsky's Language and Mind. ~ Forrest Spencer
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Special Features

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Product Details

  • Release Date: 11/20/2001
  • UPC: 032031157095
  • Rating:

  • Source: Kultur Video
  • Aspect Ratio: Pre-1954 Standard (1.33.1)
  • Sound: Dolby Digital Stereo
  • Language: English
  • Time: 13:00:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 52,818

Scene Index

Side #1 -- Lecture 1: Musical Phonology
1. Beginning/Introduction [4:09]
2. Musical Grammar [6:45]
3. Overview of Linguistics [6:11]
4. A Common Origin [7:30]
5. Heightened Speech [4:44]
6. The Harmonic Series [8:33]
7. Tempered Tones [4:35]
8. Universals [5:57]
9. Musical Monogenesis [8:39]
10. The Golden Age [7:44]
11. Diatonic Containment [3:38]
12. Mozart's Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K. 550: Molto Allegro [8:40]
13. Mozart's Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K. 550: Andante [8:21]
14. Mozart's Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K. 550: Menuetto: Allegretto - Trio [5:04]
15. Mozart's Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K. 550: Allegro Assai [9:19]
16. Conclusion [4:53]
Side #2 -- Lecture 2: Musical Syntax
1. Beginning/Introduction [2:13]
2. Chomsky's Universal Grammar [8:18]
3. Verbal & Musical Correspondences [5:11]
4. Interdisciplinary Terms [3:26]
5. Transformational Grammar [8:56]
6. Musical Analogies [9:48]
7. Poetry: A True Parallel With Music [5:41]
8. Musical Prose [10:19]
9. Surface Structure [:59]
10. Mozart's Symphony No. 40 in G Minor K. 550 Performed for 21 Bars Showing the "Surface Structure" [:32]
11. Deep Structure [5:43]
12. Symmetry [7:21]
13. Bar-by-Bar Accentuation [6:25]
14. Structural Ambiguities [10:03]
15. Review of Entire First Movement of Mozart's Symphony No. 40 in G Minor K. 550 [8:24]
16. Conclusion [2:19]
Side #3 -- Lecture 3: Musical Semantics
1. Beginning/Introduction [1:31]
2. Semantic Ambiguity [11:30]
3. Musical Metaphor [3:38]
4. Musical Semantics [5:50]
5. What Does Music Mean? [12:45]
6. Musical Equivalents for Figures of Speech [6:37]
7. Repetition [13:11]
8. Analysis of Beethoven's Pastorale Symphony [8:11]
9. Transforming Repetition Into Metaphor [13:20]
10. Varied Repetitions [16:09]
11. Beethoven Symphony No. 6 in F Major: I. Allegro Ma Non Troppo [11:50]
12. Beethoven Symphony No. 6 in F Major: II. Andante Molto Mosso [13:50]
13. Beethoven Symphony No. 6 in F Major: III. Allegro, IV. Allegro, V. Allegretto [20:19]
14. Conclusion [3:28]
Side #4 -- Lecture 4: The Delights and Dangers of Ambiguity
1. Beginning/Introduction [2:12]
2. Defining Ambiguity [8:36]
3. Beethoven and the Increase of Ambiguity [4:55]
4. Ambiguity and the Romantic Revolution [8:36]
5. Chromaticism [5:50]
6. Chromatic Ambiguity [16:16]
7. Berlioz: Romeo Alone - Festivities in Capulet's Palace From Romeo and Juliet [13:06]
8. Berlioz and Wagner [4:31]
9. The Growth of Tonal Language [12:07]
10. Wagner: Prelude and Liebestod From Tristan und Isolde [22:32]
11. The Brink of Radical Change [20:34]
12. Toward Total Ambiguity [8:46]
13. Debussy: Prelude a l'Apres Midi d'une Faune [11:45]
14. Conclusion [2:43]
Side #5 -- Lecture 5: The Twentieth Century Crisis
1. Beginning/Introduction [:54]
2. Ravel: Rapsodie Espagnole, Mvt. 4 (Feria) [6:50]
3. The Crisis in Musical Semantics [5:45]
4. The Renunciation of Tonality [5:17]
5. Ives' The Unanswered Question [5:27]
6. The Dilemma of the New Century [4:21]
7. The Twelve Tone Method [16:32]
8. Atonality and Tonality [9:32]
9. Is Music Ultimately Tonal? [10:06]
10. Negative and Positive Ambiguity [5:56]
11. Berg: Violin Concerto - Excerpt [12:16]
12. Mahler's Prophetic Visions [15:40]
13. Mahler's Farewell [5:40]
14. Mahler: Symphony No. 9 in D Major, Mvt. 4 [28:45]
Side #6 -- Lecture 6: The Poetry of Earth
1. Beginning/Introduction [4:05]
2. Art and Artificiality [5:51]
3. Objectivity and Expression [8:52]
4. New Tonal Dissonances [9:05]
5. Stravinsky's Asymmetrical Structures [13:39]
6. Old and New Vernaculars [7:22]
7. Stravinsky's Neoclassicism [10:02]
8. Neoclassicism in Poetry [17:37]
9. Abstract Semantics [11:47]
10. The Sense of the Absurd [8:21]
11. Analysis of Oedipus Rex [20:20]
12. Stravinsky: Oedipus Rex [54:33]
13. Conclusion [5:40]
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Menu

Side #1 -- Lecture 1: Musical Phonology
   Play Feature
   Chapter Selections
Side #2 -- Lecture 2: Musical Syntax
   Play Lecture
   Chapter Selections
Side #3 -- Lecture 3: Musical Semantics
   Play Lecture
   Chapter Selections
Side #4 -- Lecture 4: The Delights and Dangers of Ambiguity
   Play Lecture
   Chapter Selections
Side #5 -- Lecture 5: The Twentieth Century Crisis
   Play Lecture
   Chapter Selections
Side #6 -- Lecture 6: The Poetry of Earth
   Play Lecture
   Chapter Selections
Read More Show Less

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    An accessible genius

    As great as Bernstein was at so many things, his greatest ability was to teach. In this six-part series, he starts out by saying that this will not be a lecture on musical history and then proceeds to do just that and do it like nobody else can. Don¿t be put off by a diversion into some linguistics mumbo jumbo in the beginning. It won¿t be long before Bernstein dumps that silly pretext for the lecture and dives straight into a review of classical music history. You¿ll come away feeling like an expert and you¿ll enjoy every minute. Bernstein frequently demonstrates his points on the piano and each time it¿s a thrill to hear him play. This presentation demands your attention yet is very accessible and rewarding for the non musician.

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