Up the Down Staircase

( 2 )

Overview

A serious social drama film of the type that flourished in the 1960's, Up the Down Staircase seems somewhat dated and preachy when viewed by modern audiences. The subject matter is laudable, of course: an ambitious, spirited and concerned young teacher determined to make a difference in a troubled inner city school. And there are quite a few memorable moments, including a very well-directed juxtaposition of Sylvia Barrett triumphing by getting her class excited about A Tale of Two Cities as the lovelorn and ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (DVD)
  • All (5) from $5.95   
  • New (3) from $5.95   
  • Used (2) from $19.54   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$5.95
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new item will ship first class mail with delivery confirmation

Ships from: Levittown, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
$6.18
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(193)

Condition: New
DVD New 085391144762 100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. IN STOCK READY TO SHIP. NEW AND SEALED. THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST! ! !

Ships from: GLEN HEAD, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$21.51
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(2317)

Condition: New
085391144762 This item is brand new. Please allow 4 - 14 business days for Standard shipping, within the US. Thank you for supporting our small, family-owned business!

Ships from: ACWORTH, GA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

A serious social drama film of the type that flourished in the 1960's, Up the Down Staircase seems somewhat dated and preachy when viewed by modern audiences. The subject matter is laudable, of course: an ambitious, spirited and concerned young teacher determined to make a difference in a troubled inner city school. And there are quite a few memorable moments, including a very well-directed juxtaposition of Sylvia Barrett triumphing by getting her class excited about A Tale of Two Cities as the lovelorn and dejected Alice Blake quietly and calmly examines the classroom of the teacher she loves before jumping from a window. Director Robert Mulligan also provides appropriate tension to a scene in which another troubled student forcefully comes on to the young teacher, and throughout he does a commendable job of using a hand held camera and a very busy, overlapping soundtrack to convey the tumult, confusion and chaos of the high school. He is less successful in overcoming the script's tendency to excessive earnestness and dialogue that often sacrifices subtlety and nuance to make its points. The film also suffers from a bit of hollowness at its core. Some of this is due to Sandy Dennis's performance - her peculiar brand of acting, while effective in conveying much about the character, also tends to isolate her from the other cast members. However, the decision to present the character solely in terms of the school and its immediate environs and never in her home life also contributes to the hollowness. The supporting cast is marvelous, with a mixture of seasoned pros and novices, although one wishes Eileen Heckart had been given more to do. Despite its flaws, Staircase remains involving.
Read More Show Less

Special Features

Theatrical trailer; Subtitles: English & Français (Main feature only)
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
A serious social drama film of the type that flourished in the 1960's, Up the Down Staircase seems somewhat dated and preachy when viewed by modern audiences. The subject matter is laudable, of course: an ambitious, spirited and concerned young teacher determined to make a difference in a troubled inner city school. And there are quite a few memorable moments, including a very well-directed juxtaposition of Sylvia Barrett triumphing by getting her class excited about A Tale of Two Cities as the lovelorn and dejected Alice Blake quietly and calmly examines the classroom of the teacher she loves before jumping from a window. Director Robert Mulligan also provides appropriate tension to a scene in which another troubled student forcefully comes on to the young teacher, and throughout he does a commendable job of using a hand held camera and a very busy, overlapping soundtrack to convey the tumult, confusion and chaos of the high school. He is less successful in overcoming the script's tendency to excessive earnestness and dialogue that often sacrifices subtlety and nuance to make its points. The film also suffers from a bit of hollowness at its core. Some of this is due to Sandy Dennis's performance - her peculiar brand of acting, while effective in conveying much about the character, also tends to isolate her from the other cast members. However, the decision to present the character solely in terms of the school and its immediate environs and never in her home life also contributes to the hollowness. The supporting cast is marvelous, with a mixture of seasoned pros and novices, although one wishes Eileen Heckart had been given more to do. Despite its flaws, Staircase remains involving.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 11/6/2007
  • UPC: 085391144762
  • Original Release: 1967
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Home Video
  • Region Code: 1
  • Time: 2:04:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Sandy Dennis Sylvia Barrett
Patrick Bedford Paul Barringer
Eileen Heckart Henrietta Pastorfield
Ruth White Beatrice Schacter
Jean Stapleton Sadie Finch
Sorrell Booke Dr. Bester
Roy Poole Mr. McHabe
Florence Stanley Ella Friedenberg
Jeff Howard Joe Ferone
Ellen O'Mara Alice Blake
John Fantauzzi Ed Williams
Loretta Leversee Social Studies Teacher
Robert Levine Mr. Osborne
Elena Karam Nurse Eagen
Frances Sternhagen Charlotte Wolf
Vinnette Carrol The Mother
José Antonio Rodriguez Himself
José Rodriguez José
Technical Credits
Robert Mulligan Director
Folmar Blangsted Editor
Irving Buchman Makeup
Joseph Coffey Cinematographer
George Jenkins Art Director
Fred Karlin Score Composer
Tad Mosel Screenwriter
Alan J. Pakula Producer
Ann Roth Costumes/Costume Designer
Read More Show Less

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Up the Down Staircase
1. Credits [2:41]
2. Up the Down Staircase [4:12]
3. Room 322 [3:17]
4. Disregarding Instructions [5:07]
5. Joe Ferone [3:20]
6. Mashed Potatoes at 10:17 A.M. [2:44]
7. Assembly [2:52]
8. Faculty Meeting [3:26]
9. Why We Read [5:20]
10. No Time for Teaching [3:24]
11. Failure to Fill Out Forms [2:05]
12. Menace, Marriage and Macbeth [4:50]
13. Tea and Little Sympathy [1:31]
14. PRCs, PPPs and CCs [5:07]
15. Hands Off My Potential [4:45]
16. Suggestion Box [4:21]
17. 18 to 6 [2:14]
18. Boogalooing [2:50]
19. A Dance for Alice [4:00]
20. Proofreading a Love Letter [1:53]
21. Best/Worst of Times [3:27]
22. Jumped or Fell [5:32]
23. No Comment [4:22]
24. Eddie Drops Out [2:42]
25. Barringer Drops Out [3:25]
26. Examinations [3:55]
27. Open House [5:26]
28. Alone Now [4:49]
29. Resignation [4:55]
30. Green Lawns and High Tuition [2:11]
31. Judge José [3:06]
32. Hi, Teach. Hi Pupe. [5:03]
33. Cast List [3:10]
Read More Show Less

Menu

Disc #1 -- Up the Down Staircase
   Play Movie
   Scene Selections
   Theatrical Trailer
   Languages
      Spoken Languages
         English
      Subtitles
         English
         English (For the Hearing Impaired)
         Français
         Off
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2004

    A Wonderful Movie

    I love this movie! I was knocked out by director Pakula's interpretation of the book. He (and Tad Mosel, the screenwriter) fleshed it out considerably and added dimension and depth to the characters without once bypassing any of the book's tone and purpose. There is much to be lauded about this movie. First, of course, is Sandy Dennis's flawless portrayal of Sylvia Barrett. Dennis imparted considerable pathos and emotion to the young, idealistic teacher. The other parts were perfectly cast, right down to Jose Rodriguez (which is his name in the book, his name in the movie, and his real name, to boot!). There is no sex, no bad language, no nudity-- nothing that current films are so rife with. This was back when movie makers had to rely on their imagination, education, and sensitivity to put together an excellent movie. Not like today, where things tawdry and gruesome and depressing are featured and sensibility is empty and meaningless. See this movie-- you won't be disappointed.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews