War & Peace

( 3 )

Overview

Russian director Sergei Bondarchuk's epic version of Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace Voyna i Mir was the most expensive European film ever made for many years. It certainly had one of the longest gestation periods, with Bondarchuk spending seven years filming the project the actors noticeably age from scene to scene. In relating Tolstoy's complex tale of Napoleon's invasion of Russia, Bondarchuk helmed some of the most graphic battle scenes ever seen, one of which runs nearly 45 minutes. So many horses were killed in...
See more details below
DVD
$36.27
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$39.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (DVD)
  • All (8) from $24.87   
  • New (6) from $24.87   
  • Used (2) from $34.91   

Overview

Russian director Sergei Bondarchuk's epic version of Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace Voyna i Mir was the most expensive European film ever made for many years. It certainly had one of the longest gestation periods, with Bondarchuk spending seven years filming the project the actors noticeably age from scene to scene. In relating Tolstoy's complex tale of Napoleon's invasion of Russia, Bondarchuk helmed some of the most graphic battle scenes ever seen, one of which runs nearly 45 minutes. So many horses were killed in these sequences that the film was loudly boycotted in some American cities by the ASPCA. While Bondarchuk is slavish to the source material, he does make a few Hollywood-like concessions to popular appeal; his leading lady Lyudmila Savelyeva looks exactly like Audrey Hepburn, the star of King Vidor's 1956 filmization of the Tolstoy novel. Originally clocking in at 507 minutes, War and Peace was pared down to 373 minutes for American consumption. It became a surprise theatrical hit, and a ratings bonanza when it was telecast on the ABC network in four parts from August 12 through 15, 1972. A big film, to be sure -- but few modern critics consider Bondarchuk's War and Peace a great film, citing its many deadly dull passages and its sappy, operatic finale. The dubbed American version is narrated by Norman Rose. The full Russian-language version with English subtitles is now available on video.
Read More Show Less

Special Features

[None specified]
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/29/2002
  • UPC: 032031133990
  • Original Release: 1967
  • Rating:

  • Source: Kultur Video
  • Language: Russian
  • Time: 6:43:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 5,506

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Lyudmila Savelyeva Natasha Rostova
Sergei Bondarchuk Pierre Bezukhov
Vyacheslav Tikhonov Andrei Bolkonsky
Viktor Stanitsyn Count Ilya Rostov
Kira Ivanova-Golovko Countess Rostova
Oleg Tabakov Nikolai Rostov
Seryozha Yermilov Petya Rostov as a Boy
Nikoly Kodin Petya Rostov
Irina Gubanova Sonya
Anatoly Ktorov Prince Nikolai Bolkonsky
Antonina Shuranova Princess Maria
A. Stepanova Anna Scherer
Anastasia Vertinskaya Princess Liza Bolkonskaya
Irina Skobtseva Helene Kuragin
Vasiliy Lanovoy Anatole Kuragin
Boris Smirnov Prince Vasiliy Kuragin
Boris Zakhava Gen. Kutuzov
Oleg N. Yefremov Dolokhov
Yelena Tyapkina Marya Akhrosimova
Eduard Martsevich Drubetskoy
Alexander F. Borisov Uncle Mikhail
Vladislav Strzhelchik Napoleon Bonaparte
Nickolay Trofimov Tushin
Nikolai Rybnikov Denisov
Yuri Chekulaev Nesvitskiy
Nikolai Grinko
Petr Kiryutkin
Ervin Knausmyuller
A. Lebedev
Volodia Levchenko
Nikita Mikhalkov (cameo)
Georgiy Millyar Morel
Nonna Mordyukova Anisya Fyodorovna
Daniil Netrebin
Sergei Nikonenko
Klavdiya Polovikova Princess Anna Drubetskaya
Norman Rose English Narrator
Pyotr Savin Timokhin
Georgiy Shapovalov
Andrei Smirnov Staff Officer
Georgiy Svetlani
N. Tolkachyov Count Bezukhov
Alexander Yachnitsky
Technical Credits
Sergei Bondarchuk Director, Producer, Screenwriter
Mikhail Chikiryov Makeup
G. Koshelyov Set Decoration/Design
Gennadiy Myasnikov Art Director
Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov Score Composer
Leo Tolstoy Source Author
Read More Show Less

Scene Index

Side #1 -- Part One
1. Introduction [1:57]
2. Opening Credits [3:01]
3. 1805 - Anna Pavlovna Scherer's Soirée in St. Petersburg [9:59]
4. The Drinking Party [5:47]
5. Natasha Turns Thirteen [7:27]
6. The Dance [2:23]
7. Count Bezukhov Suffers Another Stroke [9:32]
8. At Bald Hills Estate [10:55]
9. General Kutuzov's Army Enters Austria [14:10]
10. The Battle of Schön Grabern [6:40]
11. Pierre and Helene [9:28]
12. Russian and Austrian Armies in Review [6:02]
13. Prince Andrei Dreams of Glory [2:51]
14. The Battle of Austerlitz [3:06]
15. Prince Andrei Falls in Battle [3:07]
16. 1806 - Nikolai Rostov Returns to Moscow [2:18]
17. The Banquet Honoring Prince Bagration [8:07]
18. Pierre Challenges Dolohov to a Duel [3:22]
19. Liza's Labor [8:59]
20. Prince Andrei Returns [2:12]
21. Pierre and Prince Andrei Exchange Philosophies [5:38]
22. Prince Andrei Visits the Rostov Estate [5:46]
Side #2 -- Part Two
1. Opening Credits [2:26]
2. 1807 - The Treaty of Tilsit Is Signed [4:24]
3. Dec. 31, 1809 - New Year's Eve Ball Preparations [2:30]
4. The Grand Ballroom [6:06]
5. The Waltz - Natasha and Prince Andrei [11:34]
6. Natasha and Prince Andrei Declare Their Love [6:39]
7. The Wolf Hunt [13:26]
8. Natasha's Guitar Dance [21:09]
9. Natasha Is Swept By Prince Anatole [17:30]
10. Prince Andrei Repsonds [1:24]
11. Pierre's Confession [4:32]
12. June 12, 1812 - France Invades Russia [1:14]
Side #3 -- Part Three and Part Four
1. Opening Credits [2:31]
2. 1812 - The French Army Enters Russia [11:52]
3. The Death of Prince Bolkonsky [8:46]
4. General Kutuzov Re-Assumes Command [12:45]
5. Prince Andrei's Pre-Battle Thoughts [7:44]
6. The Battle of Borodino [6:47]
7. Napoleon Commands His Troops in Battle [7:07]
8. Prince Andrei Is Wounded [17:54]
9. The Consequences of the Battle of Borodino [1:45]
10. Opening Credits [2:09]
11. Sept. 1, 1812 - General Kutuzov Orders the Retreat From Moscow [5:39]
12. The Exodus From Moscow [1:29]
13. Napoleon Anticipates the Capture of Moscow [1:34]
14. The French Army Enters Moscow [2:35]
15. Napoleon Surveys the Treasures of Moscow [:16]
16. Natasha Visits the Wounded Prince Andrei [7:39]
17. The Pillage and Burning of Moscow [1:54]
18. The Death of Prince Andrei [23:48]
19. The French Army Departs Moscow [12:06]
20. Petya Rostov Is Killed in Battle [13:10]
21. The French Army's Wintry Retreat [3:03]
22. Napoleon's Final Address to His Troops [1:42]
23. General Kutuzov's Final Address to His Troops [7:22]
24. Natasha and Pierre Reunited [3:12]
Read More Show Less

Menu

Side #1 -- Part One
   Play Feature
   Chapter Selections
   Bonus Menus
      Sergei Bondarchuk Biography & Filmography
      Leo Tolstoy Biography
Side #2 -- Part Two
   Play Feature
   Chapter Selections
   Bonus Menus
      Sergei Bondarchuk Biography & Filmography
      Leo Tolstoy Biography
Side #3 -- Part Three and Part Four
   Play Feature
   Chapter Selections
      Part III
      Part IV
   Bonus Menus
      Sergei Bondarchuk Biography & Filmography
      Leo Tolstoy Biography
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Don't even THINK about the Kultur Release

    I'll skip most of the superlatives and get to the point; this is perhaps one of the greatest (certainly most ambitious) films ever made. The heinous Kultur English-dubbed pan-and-scan version is a disgrace and an HUGE disservice to the original. DON'T WASTE YOUR MONEY!. The Rusico version - wide-screen and with restored footage is not perfect (especially the sadly not-restored video), however one can at least appreciate the the original vision of the Director. Additionally, there are a large number of 'DVD bonus features' included - some quite interesting, some rather dull propaganda. But between the restored 7+ hour cut of the film and the extras, this set presents 5 FULL DVDs (compared to Kultur's 6 hour version, with no extras, on 3 DVDs). Perhaps the greatest differenceis the sound. It seems as though there HAS been some sound restoration accomplished; at least the sound was infinately better than on the Kultur version. Skip the English dubbed version. The translation is not very good, and the lines are read in an almost emotionless dead-pan recitation. Also, the restored scenes are virtually missing any dubbing. But in my opinion, if you feel the need to watch this dubbed, then you probably have no business buying it in the first place. If you want to experience one of the world's great films, the Rusico version will be a highlight of your collection.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    greatest russian epic

    This is the greatest epic ever made since Abel Gance made Napoleon in 1927. It bigger than Ben Hur and GWTW. The action scenes will never again be equaled in film history and some of the acting is brilliant. Most of all its faithful to leo Tolstoy and if u don't want to plow thru the book spend 7 hours with this film and you will be thrilled and moved for days to come.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews