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Way Down East
     

Way Down East

4.0 1
Director: D.W. Griffith, Lillian Gish, Richard Barthelmess, Lowell Sherman

Cast: D.W. Griffith, Lillian Gish, Richard Barthelmess, Lowell Sherman

 

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Restored to its original running time and presented at the authentic projection speed, this digitally remastered, color-tinted D.W. Griffith masterpiece of love and loss is preserved on DVD for future generations thanks to the efforts of the fine folks at Image Entertainment. Featuring a standard 1.33:1 full-frame image accompanied by a remixed Dolby Digital Mono

Overview

Restored to its original running time and presented at the authentic projection speed, this digitally remastered, color-tinted D.W. Griffith masterpiece of love and loss is preserved on DVD for future generations thanks to the efforts of the fine folks at Image Entertainment. Featuring a standard 1.33:1 full-frame image accompanied by a remixed Dolby Digital Mono soundtrack, the original Louis Silvers score is taken from a full orchestral performance recorded on Vitaphone discs in 1928.

Product Details

Release Date:
12/01/1998
UPC:
0014381467727
Original Release:
1920
Rating:
NR
Source:
Image Entertainment
Region Code:
1
Sound:
[Dolby Digital, monaural]
Time:
2:26:00
Sales rank:
71,087

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Lillian Gish Anna Moore
Richard Barthelmess David Bartlett
Lowell Sherman Lennox Sanderson
Burr McIntosh Squire Bartlett
Creighton Hale Prof. Sterling
Kate Bruce Mrs. Bartlett
Mary Hay Kate Brewster
Emily Fitzroy Maria Poole
Edgar Nelson Hi Holler
George Neville Reuben 'Rube' Whipple
Florence Short The Eccentric Aunt
Porter Strong Seth Holcomb

Technical Credits
D.W. Griffith Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Billy Bitzer Cinematographer
G.W. Blitzer Cinematographer
Anthony Paul Kelly Screenwriter
William Frederick Peters Score Composer
Rose Smith Editor
Hendrik Sartov Cinematographer
Charles Osborne Seessel Art Director
Louis Silvers Score Composer
James Smith Editor
Herbert Sutch Asst. Director
Frank Walsh Asst. Director

Scene Index

Main
1. Main title; a remote village in New England [7:31]
2. Anna arrives at Aunt Tremont's [5:37]
3. Chapter II: Bartlett Village [9:41]
4. Sanderson's proposal [11:10]
5. The post office has been robbed [4:57]
6. Chapter IV: Anna's great secret [10:36]
7. Anna in hiding [11:52]
8. In search of work [8:02]
9. Kate's homecoming [11:06]
10. Part I [12:04]
11. Her past revealed [3:48]
12. At the squires's [12:26]
13. The neighbor's barn dance [8:11]
14. The squire goes to Belden [3:54]
15. The whole truth [6:34]
16. And the storm [5:51]
17. The great ice break [6:09]
18. A happy Ending [5:21]

Customer Reviews

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4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just happened to watch this movie while I was reading Thomas Hardys Tess of the D'Urbervilles, and by the end it had hit me that the film was loosly bassed off of this classic novel. Sure, lots of things are changed and it is made a bit more wholesome from the version of the nowel we see today. However, the origional publications of the 1891 novel had to be edited from the origonal, what we read today. This version of the story involves a fake marriage rather then a rape and thus a slightly more inocent figure of Tess. This is what the film plays on and. The more that I think about it, the more it is the same. I mean at the begining, Lillian Gish's character Anne, basicly Tess, goes to get some money from rich relatives to help the family farm, and is tricked into a fake marriage which results in pregnacy. Anne's baby dies too, and she even baptizes it in just the way that Tess did. Then Anne goes to work on a religious squires farm where she falls inlove with the angelic son, David. Anne refuses marriage repeatedly and then her secret is dramaticly revealed and she is forced off the farm in the middle of a snow storm. Since it is 1920, of course there is a happy ending, but the mood of the film is the same as in the book. There is even a Mercy chant figure in the form of Davids cousin, whom his parents want him to marry. A very nice film and an interesting subject for Hardy fans. Any one who has read the book may find this story a rather butchered adaptation, but it is not trieing to be the exact story and thus should be veiwed sympatheticly. I do recomend this to those who have read the book though, just for fun.