Who the $#%& is Jackson Pollock?

( 2 )

Overview

Filmmaker Harry Moses offers humorous and revealing insight into the art authentication process in America by documenting the remarkable tale of a seventy-three-year old former long haul trucker who was snubbed by the art establishment after purchasing a Jackson Pollock painting for five dollars at a local thrift shop. When Teri Horton purchased a painting by one of the Twentieth Century's most respected abstract expressionist artists, she never suspected that she would find herself struggling against some of the...
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Overview

Filmmaker Harry Moses offers humorous and revealing insight into the art authentication process in America by documenting the remarkable tale of a seventy-three-year old former long haul trucker who was snubbed by the art establishment after purchasing a Jackson Pollock painting for five dollars at a local thrift shop. When Teri Horton purchased a painting by one of the Twentieth Century's most respected abstract expressionist artists, she never suspected that she would find herself struggling against some of the most powerful figures in the world of art. Despite hiring a forensic scientist who discovered that a fingerprint on the back of the painting's canvas proved a positive match with a fingerprint discovered on a can of paint in Pollock's studio, and that the paint itself matched a can of pain found on Pollock's studio floor, Horton was inexplicably snubbed when the art establishment proclaimed that the painting which should have fetched upwards of $50 million was completely worthless. In the fifteen years that followed, the ageing woman with only an eighth grade education would embark on an arduous uphill battle against the elitists of the art world that would forever reveals the secrets of just how art is purchased and sold in modern day America.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 5/1/2007
  • UPC: 794043107627
  • Original Release: 2006
  • Rating:

  • Source: New Line Home Video
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Wide Screen
  • Sound: Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:14:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 8,768

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Teri Horton Participant
Peter Paul Biro Participant
Thomas Hoving Participant
Bill Page Participant
Tod Volpe Participant
Jeffrey Bergen Participant
Ben Heller Participant
Technical Credits
Harry Moses Director, Producer, Screenwriter
Terence Blanchard Score Composer
William Cassara Camera Operator
Jay Freund Editor
Steven Hewitt Producer
Don Hewitt Executive Producer
Everett Wong Sound/Sound Designer
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Who the #$&% Is Jackson Pollock?
1. Opening [6:01]
2. Greatest Artist [6:07]
3. Shouldn't Care [6:16]
4. Decision Makers [5:40]
5. Finger Print [9:30]
6. A Match [2:32]
7. Two Different Worlds [6:31]
8. Didn't Bother Me [6:29]
9. Shares In a Painting [5:08]
10. Convince Experts [5:42]
11. Madman [10:08]
12. End Credits [3:48]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Who the #$&% Is Jackson Pollock?
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      Audio Optimized for DVD No Re-equalization Requires
      Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound Stereo Surround Sound
      Subtitles: English
      Subtitles: Spanish
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   Sneak Peeks
   DVD Rom/Online Features
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

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3 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    Best hour long documentary of the decade.

    Compelling story, genuine 'characters' master editing, just right. worth a second look, and a good story for group discussing. highest rating = 5 Stars.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The Art World Vs. Forensic Science: Who Wins?

    This is a fascinating, albeit frustrating film to watch. At face value, it is a story that objectively questions the authenticity of an alleged Jackson Pollock piece of art. Peel back the layers, and you find a story of The Haves vs. The Have-Nots; the Aristocracy vs. The Working Class, if you will.

    The art critics/experts in this film rub me the wrong way: so sure of their certainty are they, that they ignore forensic evidence that contradicts their own beliefs. One such expert, Thomas Hoving, is so steadfast in his commitment to his opinion, that at one point he essentially claims that forensic evidence of Pollock's fingerprints on the piece of art is inconsequential. HIS opinion matters, not science's. You see, the mucky-muck art experts are so incensed that a former truck driver possesses a Pollock, that they go to any lengths to blackball her despite evidence that points in her favor. How the art world can tolerate itself is beyond me: as much as I love art, this movie opened my eyes to the corruption and aritocratic filth that runs the world of art-dealing. It's sickening.

    Tha being said, the lady who possesses the painting, Teri Horton, also opens herself to criticism. Once evidence had essentially proven that her painting was authentic, she seemingly refused to take less than $50 million dollars for the painting (a high offer of $9 million dollars was declined). Here is a lady who has lived on the fringes of poverty her whole life, and despite being at odds with the upper-class art world, has essentially BECOME one of "them" through greed. A puzzling transition that leads me to believe that both sides of the battle have been blinded by economic interest, not artistic. I'm not sure Pollock would approve of such behavior.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews