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Whole New Thing

( 2 )

Overview

A precocious teenage genius is suddenly forced to adapt to the real world, while the real world around him is having some growing pains of its own in this independent comedy drama from Canada. Emerson Thorsen Aaron Webber is an exceptionally talented and intelligent 13-year-old who has been raised and educated by his free-thinking parents ,Rog Robert Joy and Kaya Rebecca Jenkins. While Emerson is clever, witty, and has recently written his first novel, he doesn't seem to have very good socialization skills when ...
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Overview

A precocious teenage genius is suddenly forced to adapt to the real world, while the real world around him is having some growing pains of its own in this independent comedy drama from Canada. Emerson Thorsen Aaron Webber is an exceptionally talented and intelligent 13-year-old who has been raised and educated by his free-thinking parents ,Rog Robert Joy and Kaya Rebecca Jenkins. While Emerson is clever, witty, and has recently written his first novel, he doesn't seem to have very good socialization skills when he spends time with others, and as he enters adolescence, Rog and Kaya decide to enroll him in public school so he can learn how to function with others as well as patching up some gaps in his education. While most of Emerson's teachers are happy to have him in class, his ambiguous sexuality and tart intellectualism make him an immediate target for bullies in his small Nova Scotia town. Emerson's English teacher, Don Grant Daniel MacIvor, has a bigger problem than most with his new student -- Emerson becomes quite infatuated with Don, and isn't at all shy about expressing his attraction, while the closeted Don is torn between a desire to return his advances and the knowledge that he'd be throwing away his career in education if he even acknowledged them. Whole New Thing received its world premier at the 2004 Toronto Film Festival.
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Special Features

Closed Caption; Director & Actor Interviews; Theatrical Trailer; Coming Attractions; Photo Gallery
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 7/31/2007
  • UPC: 667443575146
  • Original Release: 2005
  • Rating:

  • Source: Picture This
  • Region Code: 1
  • Time: 1:32:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Aaron Webber Emerson Thorsen
Daniel MacIvor Don Grant
Rebecca Jenkins Kaya Thorsen
Robert Joy Rog Thorsen
Callum Keith Rennie
Kathryn MacLellan
Drew O'Hara
Hugh Thompson
Jackie Torres
Technical Credits
Amnon Buchbinder Director, Screenwriter
Angela Baker Editor
Christopher Ball Cinematographer
Kelly Bray Producer
David Buchbinder Score Composer
Lin Chapman Costumes/Costume Designer
Bill Fleming Production Designer
Camelia Frieberg Executive Producer, Producer
Daniel MacIvor Associate Producer, Screenwriter
Al Ormerod Sound/Sound Designer
Mary Reynolds Asst. Director
Jim Rillie Sound/Sound Designer
Jane Tattersall Sound/Sound Designer
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Whole New Thing
1. Opening Credits [4:25]
2. Clean Sheets [2:44]
3. 4th Grade Level [2:30]
4. Middle School [5:32]
5. Teacher Conference [4:15]
6. First Day [2:57]
7. Dinner Party [4:26]
8. As You Like It [4:34]
9. Anomalies [5:20]
10. First Crush [6:40]
11. Sauna [6:10]
12. Going Out [6:54]
13. Ex-Boyfriend [3:03]
14. Gay & OK [5:13]
15. Jealous Husband [5:31]
16. Revenge [3:55]
17. Stowaway [4:36]
18. On The Run [2:31]
19. Bad Date [5:54]
20. Rescue [2:00]
21. End Credits [2:50]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Whole New Thing
   Play Movie
   Set Up
      Subtitles: Spanish
      Subtitles: English Closed Captioning
      Subtitles: None
      Audio: 5.1 Dolby Surround
      Audio: 2.0 Stereo
   Scene Selection
   Special Features
      Theatrical Trailer
      Interview With Director Amnon Buchbinder
      Interview With Actor Aaron Webber
      Photo Gallery
   Coming Attractions
      Play All
      Look to the Sky
      Boy From Lebanon
      The Recruiter
      A Love to Hide
      Boys Briefs 4
      Boys Briefs 3
      Innocent
      Cold Showers
      Mirage
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

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4 Star

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2 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A reviewer

    WHOLE NEW THING is another fine little film from Canada, utilizing an excellent cast of Canadian actors to present a modern day conundrum about identity in a manner more sensitive than most other films addressing the subject. Director/writer (with actor Daniel MacIvor) Amnon Buchbinder has created a series of characters, seemingly disparate in age and outlook, who each has a problem coping with who they actually are, and with great skill this story interweaves these fascinating people, isolated by the frigid planes of Nova Scotia into a complex puzzle that answers far more questions about identity than is at first apparent. Emerson (a strong debut for Aaron Webber) is the thirteen-year-old son of environmentalist/post-hippie parents Kaya (Rebecca Jenkins) and Rog (Robert Joy) whose creative look at life has provided home schooling for Emerson, encouraged his gift for writing, but now find that there are gaps in Emerson's education that suggest enrolling him in the local Middle School might mend. Kaya and Rog are in a stale marriage: each has needs the other can't appreciate. Emerson enjoys his isolation and is not eager to move into the 'mainstream' by attending school. Kaya visits the middle school and meets teacher Don Grant (Daniel MacIvor) whom she invites to her home to meet and impress Emerson. Don is a bright, lovable teacher who has failed in gay relationships, relegating his needs to visits to park restrooms. When Don comes to dinner, Emerson is impressed with Don's acceptance of Emerson's outlook and decides to give the school a chance. Emerson, long-haired and androgynous in appearance, suffers ridicule at school but finds considerable solace in the classroom atmosphere Don Grant adapts to suit Emerson's intelligent needs. Don is 42 and Emerson is 13 and while they become friends, Emerson develops his first 'crush' on Don. And while this is happening Kaya meets young stud Denny (the always excellent Callum Keith Rennie) and begins an affair. Many moments of electric snaps occur among all of the characters (a matter of whose crisis is more threatening!) and the manner in which each of the confrontations with each character and conjoined demons occur begin to resolve the seemingly improbable results that alter the growth of each. Part of the success of a film dealing with such subject matter is the manner in which each of the stories is told. There is no crude acting out, no pat answers, and no unnecessary 'drama' for drama's sake. This is a very honest little film that deserves the attention of a wide audience eager to understand the varying motivations of other people. Grady Harp

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews