Whoopee!

Overview

Adapted from Owen Davis's stage comedy The Nervous Wreck itself filmed in 1927, Flo Ziegfeld's musical spectacular Whoopee! was one of the solid hits of the 1928-29 Broadway season, thanks largely to the irrepressible Eddie Cantor. The property was transferred to film virtually intact in 1930, again produced by Ziegfeld in collaboration with Sam Goldwyn and again starring Cantor. The star plays Henry Williams, a wide-eyed hypochondriac who heads to a western resort town in the company of his long-suffering nurse ...
See more details below
DVD (Full Frame)
$21.99
BN.com price
Other sellers (DVD)
  • All (10) from $12.98   
  • New (10) from $12.98   
Note: This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. This disc is expected to play back in DVD Video "play only" devices and may not play back in other DVD devices including recorders and PC drives.

Overview

Adapted from Owen Davis's stage comedy The Nervous Wreck itself filmed in 1927, Flo Ziegfeld's musical spectacular Whoopee! was one of the solid hits of the 1928-29 Broadway season, thanks largely to the irrepressible Eddie Cantor. The property was transferred to film virtually intact in 1930, again produced by Ziegfeld in collaboration with Sam Goldwyn and again starring Cantor. The star plays Henry Williams, a wide-eyed hypochondriac who heads to a western resort town in the company of his long-suffering nurse Mary Custer Ethel Shutta. Meanwhile, Wanenie Paul Gregory, the son of an Indian chief, pines away out of love for white heiress Sally Morgan Eleanor Hunt, who has been forbidden to marry Wanenie because of their racial differences. One of the most unsympathetic heroines in screen history, Sally coerces Henry into helping her elope then allows the poor boob to be accused of kidnapping. All sorts of zany complications ensue, not least of which is the side-splitting scene in which Henry, disguised as an Indian, adopts a thick Jewish accent while trying to sell a rug to a tourist. The Sally/Wanenie dilemma ends happily when the young man turns out not to be Indian after all, while Henry, cured of his ills by all the excitement, marries nurse Marie. The "Ziegfeld Touch" is most obvious in the final reels, when the story stops dead in its tracks to offer a long, drawn-out parade of "Glorified" Follies girls wearing enormous headdresses and precious little else. But the film's highlight is Eddie Cantor's sly, insinuating rendition of the title song, in which he details in humorous fashion the pitfalls of "makin' whoopee" with the wrong girl. Featured among the Goldwyn Girls are such future stars as Claire Dodd, Virginia Bruce, and 14-year-old Betty Grable, who energetically performs the very first chorus of the very first song in the film. Lensed in eye-pleasing early Technicolor, Whoopee was a success, launching a long and fruitful cinematic collaboration between Eddie Cantor and Sam Goldwyn. It was remade by Goldwyn in 1944 as Up in Arms, a showcase for the producer's "new Cantor" Danny Kaye.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
Filmed for a then eye-popping $1.5 million, Whoopee! is an example of the old fashioned star comic musical film. Built entirely around the raucously neurotic personality of Eddie Cantor, Whoopee!is not great art, but it's a lot of fun. As a bonus, it features the cinematic debut of choreographer Busby Berkeley. While none of the numbers are shot entirely in the now-recognizable Berkeley style, many have touches that foreshadow that style, such as the use of an overhead shot in "Cowboy" and the use of close-ups on beautiful chorus girls in "Stetson." There's an emphasis on the spectacular throughout, which helps to smooth over some of the rough patches in the script. Much of the humor seems tired by modern standards, and the use of blackface in "My Baby Just Cares for Me" is off-putting, especially as Cantor is so otherwise appealing. He does here what he always does, playing a nervous wreck who happily can't seem to stay out of trouble. Cantor's vulnerability is leavened by his underlying rambunctiousness, and his talent was one of a kind. While Whoopee! is clearly his show, he does get some valuable support from Ethel Shutta, and the score is attractive. (Be advised, though, that the lyrics to "Makin' Whoopee" have been somewhat bowdlerized.)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 4/9/2013
  • UPC: 883316737118
  • Original Release: 1930
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Archives
  • Presentation: Full Frame
  • Time: 1:33:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 37,132

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Eddie Cantor Henry Williams
Eleanor Hunt Sally Morgan
Paul Gregory Wanenis
John Rutherford Sheriff Bob Wells
Ethel Shutta Mary Custer
Spencer Charters Jerome Underwood
Chief Caupolican Black Eagle
Albert Hackett Chester Underwood
Will H. Philbrick Andy McNabb
Walter Law Judd Morgan
Gene Alsace
Edmund Cobb
Arthur Dewey
Claire Dodd
Martin Faust
Budd Fine
Betty Grable Goldwyn Girl
Dean Jagger Deputy
Frank Lanning
Theodore Lorch
Sally Morgan Eleanor Hunt
George Olsen & His Orchestra Himself
Paul Panzer
Frank Rice
Barbara Weeks Dancer
Ruth Eddings
Mary Ashcraft
William Begg
Virginia Bruce Showgirl
Jane Keithly Show Girl
Christine Maple Showgirl
Marian Marsh Harriet Underwood
Jeanne Morgan Showgirl
Ann Sothern Bit Part
Dorothy Wellman
Technical Credits
Thornton Freeland Director
Busby Berkeley Choreography
Nacio Herb Brown Songwriter
William Conselman Screenwriter
Richard Day Art Director
Walter Donaldson Score Composer, Songwriter
Lee Garmes Cinematographer
Samuel Goldwyn Producer
John W. Harkrider Costumes/Costume Designer
Stuart Heisler Editor
Gus Kahn Songwriter
William Anthony McGuire Screenwriter
Alfred Newman Musical Direction/Supervision
Ray Rennahan Cinematographer
Gregg Toland Cinematographer
Florenz Ziegfeld Producer
Read More Show Less

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Whoopee!
1. Chapter 1 [1:36]
2. Chapter 2 [:58]
3. Chapter 3 [3:24]
4. Chapter 4 [:54]
5. Chapter 5 [3:59]
6. Chapter 6 [2:02]
7. Chapter 7 [4:19]
8. Chapter 8 [2:54]
9. Chapter 9 [3:00]
10. Chapter 10 [1:37]
11. Chapter 11 [2:44]
12. Chapter 12 [1:53]
13. Chapter 13 [3:23]
14. Chapter 14 [4:35]
15. Chapter 15 [3:47]
16. Chapter 16 [3:01]
17. Chapter 17 [4:09]
18. Chapter 18 [4:29]
19. Chapter 19 [2:57]
20. Chapter 20 [3:13]
21. Chapter 21 [5:22]
22. Chapter 22 [4:56]
23. Chapter 23 [2:38]
24. Chapter 24 [5:50]
25. Chapter 25 [1:58]
26. Chapter 26 [3:34]
27. Chapter 27 [1:03]
28. Chapter 28 [3:44]
29. Chapter 29 [2:10]
30. Chapter 30 [1:39]
31. Chapter 31 [:42]
Read More Show Less

Menu

Disc #1 -- Whoopee!
   Play Movie
   Chapters
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously