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Win Win
     

Win Win

Director: Tom McCarthy, Paul Giamatti, Amy Ryan, Bobby Cannavale

Cast: Tom McCarthy, Paul Giamatti, Amy Ryan, Bobby Cannavale

 

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Paul Giamatti headlines writer/director Tom McCarthy's comedy drama centering on a beleaguered attorney and part-time wrestling coach who schemes to keep his practice from going under by acting as the legal caretaker of an elderly client. Mike Flaherty (Giamatti) thinks he has discovered the perfect loophole to keep his practice in

Overview

Paul Giamatti headlines writer/director Tom McCarthy's comedy drama centering on a beleaguered attorney and part-time wrestling coach who schemes to keep his practice from going under by acting as the legal caretaker of an elderly client. Mike Flaherty (Giamatti) thinks he has discovered the perfect loophole to keep his practice in business. But his brilliant plan hits an unexpected hitch when his client's troubled grandson shows up looking for a place to stay. With his home life in turmoil and both of his careers in jeopardy, Mike quickly realizes that he'll have to get creative in order to find a way out of his current predicament.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Perry Seibert
Win Win, writer/director Tom McCarthy's third feature, is yet another affectionately observed human drama sprinkled with laughs and held together by an unerring interest in actors portraying the quiet, indelible moments that define a human life. It might lack the inspiration of his previous films, but its warmhearted humanitarianism is, as always, genuine and appealing. Mike Flaherty (Paul Giamatti) is a small-time lawyer and part-time high-school wrestling coach who needs some quick cash to keep his practice solvent. To that end, he makes the unethical choice to place his elderly client Leo (Burt Young) in a retirement home, and pocket the stipend awarded to the man's official guardian by the state -- even though the old man wants to stay in his own house. Eventually Leo's grandson, the terse, introverted Kyle (Alex Shaffer), shows up to visit his granddad, and, because the kid has issues with his drug-addict mother (Melanie Lynskey), he eventually moves in with the Flahertys -- much to the initial dismay of Mike's wife, Jackie (Amy Ryan). As the guarded teen slowly climbs out of his shell, he also tells Mike he'd like to join the struggling wrestling squad, where his new family learns he's a gifted grappler. However, just as the family begins to enjoy a sense of peace and the team starts winning, Kyle's mother gets out of rehab and begins proceedings to take responsibility for her father and her son. For those who enjoy the quiet, low-stakes human stories that McCarthy favors, there is much to savor in Win Win. Giamatti does everyman better than pretty much anyone else out there, and he's never afraid to let us dislike Mike's worst decisions, even if we're thoroughly sympathetic to how he got there. He's the center of a brilliant ensemble that features superb comedic support from Bobby Cannavale and Jeffrey Tambor as Mike's assistant coaches -- they're so good together you wish Cannavale might have shown up as a lost Bluth son on Arrested Development. But the big surprise among the actors is first-time performer Alex Shaffer. An accomplished high-school wrestler, Shaffer gives a deft, subtle performance; he finds nuances in Kyle's silences that seem like typical teenage inarticulateness early on, yet slowly reveal themselves to be a layer of the kid's self-protective shell. Shaffer's work here proves that McCarthy really is one of the preeminent actor's directors out there. The worst that can be said of Win Win is that McCarthy fails to link this slice-of-life to grander themes. Where his previous film, The Visitor, felt like a major statement because it was about the hot-button issue of illegal immigration, this film isn't quite as compelling -- it's less likely to sit with an audience as long as that one did. Win Win harkens back to McCarthy's first film, The Station Agent, though it's more polished than that excellent debut. At the same time, because he's a filmmaker whose muse draws him to the inherent flaws in all human beings, more "polish" doesn't always bring out his best work.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/23/2011
UPC:
0024543734437
Original Release:
2011
Rating:
R
Source:
20th Century Fox
Region Code:
A
Time:
1:46:00

Special Features

Deleted scenes; Tom McCarthy and Joe Tiboni discuss Win Win; David Thompson at Sundace 2011; In conversation with Tom McCarthy and Paul Giamatti at Sundance 2011; Family; "Think You Can Wait" music video by The National

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Paul Giamatti Mike Flaherty
Amy Ryan Jackie Flaherty
Bobby Cannavale Terry Delfino
Jeffrey Tambor Stephen Vigman
Alex Shaffer Kyle
Melanie Lynskey Cindy
Burt Young Leo Poplar
Margo Martindale Eleanor
David W. Thompson Stemler
Clare Foley Abby

Technical Credits
Tom McCarthy Director,Original Story,Producer,Screenwriter
Kerry Barden Casting
Oliver Bokelberg Cinematographer
Jacqueline Brogan Co-producer
Lori Keith Douglas Executive Producer
Lisa Maria Falcone Producer
Tom Heller Executive Producer
Michael London Producer
Tom McArdle Editor
John Paino Production Designer
Mary Ramos Musical Direction/Supervision
Paul Schnee Casting
Mary Jane Skalski Producer
Joe Tiboni Original Story
Melissa Toth Costumes/Costume Designer
Erica Tuchman Associate Producer
Lyle Workman Score Composer

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