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Dvorák: Piano Concerto, The Golden Spinning Wheel
     

Dvorák: Piano Concerto, The Golden Spinning Wheel

5.0 1
by Pierre-Laurent Aimard
 
Having given us a thoughtful, fresh set of the Beethoven piano concertos, new music maven Pierre-Laurent Aimard and period instrument specialist Nikolaus Harnoncourt continue their unexpectedly harmonious partnership with a dashing and remarkably persuasive account of Dvorák's

Overview

Having given us a thoughtful, fresh set of the Beethoven piano concertos, new music maven Pierre-Laurent Aimard and period instrument specialist Nikolaus Harnoncourt continue their unexpectedly harmonious partnership with a dashing and remarkably persuasive account of Dvorák's underrated Piano Concerto. Considering the enormous popularity of the Czech composer's Cello Concerto, it seems odd that his concertos for violin and piano are so rarely heard. The Piano Concerto needs special pleading, apparently, not because of any lack of character or melodic inspiration, but simply because the solo part is considered so unwieldy. Sviatoslav Richter knew how to make music out of it, as his justly famous EMI recording demonstrates (though its attractiveness is somewhat mitigated by booming acoustics). And Aimard knows how, too. He shows, for instance, how closely the piano's entrance echoes the opening of Beethoven's Fourth Concerto. His reading of the slow movement is rapt, almost whispered, compelling the listener to listen keenly, deeply -- and he doesn't make heavy weather of the passagework in the finale, either, rendering a delicious sense of buoyancy to the dancelike tunes. Harnoncourt and the Concertgebouw Orchestra give a sharply etched yet tenderly yielding performance of the orchestral part. The string tone is ravishing -- not just in the central Andante sostenuto but throughout -- and the recording quality is beautifully balanced and transparent. With an evocative interpretation of Dvorák's late (almost Mahlerian) tone poem The Golden Spinning Wheel, accompanying the concerto, this Teldec disc is not to be missed.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/06/2004
Label:
Teldec
UPC:
0685738763023
catalogNumber:
87630

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Piano Concerto in G minor, B. 63 (Op. 33)  - Antonin Dvorák  - Pierre-Laurent Aimard  - Thierry Cohen  -  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam  - Nikolaus Harnoncourt
  2. The Golden Spinning Wheel (Zlatý kolovrat), symphonic poem, B. 197 (Op. 109)  - Antonin Dvorák  - Thierry Cohen  -  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam  - Nikolaus Harnoncourt

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Dvorák: Piano Concerto, The Golden Spinning Wheel 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pierre-Laurent Aimard continues to present a repertoire for the piano that is never less than imaginative and is always compelling. The Dvorák Piano Concerto is rarely heard, not because it lacks beauty or inventive scoring for both piano and orchestra, but because the piece has gained the reputation of the 'Tristan' of concertos. Enter Pierre-Laurent Aimard and all of that changes. This is a lyrical, lovely, richly romantic piece and Aimard finds all of the hurdles and poetry comfortably under his hands. The second movement 'Andante Sostenuto' is so much a part of nature's quiet realm in its hushed simplicity of line that it truly transports. The fiery passages in Aimard's performance are full of excitement but never out of control. Nikolaus Harnoncourt conducts the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam with uncanny sensitivity to Aimard's interpretation. An additional bonus on this fine CD is Dvorák's tone poem 'The Golden Spinning Wheel' and is another work that belongs in the standard repertoire of our major orchestras. This is one of those recordings that can be recommended without reservation. Grady Harp