Dvorák: Symphony No. 6; Scherzo Capriccioso

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - James Manheim
Part of a cycle of Dvorák symphonies underway on the part of conductor Marin Alsop and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, this release, like the others, takes on the task of distinguishing itself from the dozens of others recorded by major European and American orchestras over the last century. In this, Alsop succeeds, although buyers should sample to make sure they find her approach appealing. Her tempos are on the slow side -- very slow in the case of the final "Scherzo capriccioso, Op. 66," which doesn't come off as especially capricious and which was recorded almost a year after the rest of the album -- and her readings are detailed, restrained, and not without a bit ...
See more details below
CD
$9.49
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$9.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (CD)
  • All (6) from $4.54   
  • New (5) from $4.54   
  • Used (1) from $9.99   

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - James Manheim
Part of a cycle of Dvorák symphonies underway on the part of conductor Marin Alsop and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, this release, like the others, takes on the task of distinguishing itself from the dozens of others recorded by major European and American orchestras over the last century. In this, Alsop succeeds, although buyers should sample to make sure they find her approach appealing. Her tempos are on the slow side -- very slow in the case of the final "Scherzo capriccioso, Op. 66," which doesn't come off as especially capricious and which was recorded almost a year after the rest of the album -- and her readings are detailed, restrained, and not without a bit of humor. If you like the serious, powerfully momentum-building Allegro non tanto of the likes of Rafael Kubelik, Alsop may not be for you here. Sample the opening material of the symphony's Scherzo track 3, the point where, for all the debt he owes to Brahms here, Dvorák asserts his Czech identity. Alsop's rhythms in the strings here are pretty low-impact -- but her slow material in both the symphony's Adagio and in the "Nocturne in B major, Op. 40," is beautifully shaped and quite affecting. The Naxos engineering team, working in a live-performance situation in Baltimore's Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, backs Alsop well, and the orchestra's strings sound quite rich. Overall there's an X factor working in the album's favor here. Alsop may or may not be precisely your cup of tea, but she executes original readings with enthusiasm and commitment, and that's the name of the game. Booklet notes by Naxos stalwart Keith Anderson are in English only.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 11/16/2010
  • Label: Naxos
  • UPC: 747313099573
  • Catalog Number: 8570995
  • Sales rank: 145,639

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Marin Alsop Primary Artist
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 14, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Highly Recommended, esp. at a budget price

    This new CD from Naxos contains three of Dvorak's best-loved works, all performed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra under Marin Alsop. To attempt to put onto CDs yet another Dvorak symphonic cycle might seem to be economic folly, because these works have been so heavily recorded for the last 60 years by many major orchestras and illustrious conductors.
    So, measured against this seemingly overwhelming opposition, how does the Baltimore team fare? I find these performances absolutely delightful, and hope for more recordings of Dvorak's symphonies from them. The sixth symphony is beautifully played, and Ms. Alsop treats us to glorious sounds from the orchestra, yet, it seems to me, she pays great attention to all of the nuances and details that together make this a superb symphony. Similarly, the Nocturne receives a fine performance. The final work on the CD is the Scherzo capriccioso, Op. 66, and here we come to a discussion point - timing vs. performance. Music critic David Hurwitz (whose opinion I generally respect) calls Alsop's performance "dreary." I disagree profoundly. Certainly, at 15:04, Alsop's timing is the longest of several that I checked, yet to my ears the performance does not drag; on the contrary, she begins crisply, which seems correct to me, and again pays attention to details and brings out the work's lyrical sections beautifully. The fastest performance to which I have access is that by Kosler, who takes 12:55, yet that performance begins languidly; speed isn't everything!
    Naxos annotator Keith Anderson's program notes are excellent, as usual, and the sound quality is superb; in my opinion, Dvorak fans can hardly go wrong with this budget-priced CD.
    Ted Wilks

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews