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Dying to Live: Near-Death Experiences
     

Dying to Live: Near-Death Experiences

2.5 2
by Susan J. Blackmore
 
Progress in medical science has increased our understanding of what happens when the brain begins to fail. Psychology delves ever more deeply into the nature of the self. In Dying to Live, Blackmore, a leading expert in near-death experiences, explores what psychology, biology, and medicine have to say about this extraordinary aspect of death and dying.

Overview

Progress in medical science has increased our understanding of what happens when the brain begins to fail. Psychology delves ever more deeply into the nature of the self. In Dying to Live, Blackmore, a leading expert in near-death experiences, explores what psychology, biology, and medicine have to say about this extraordinary aspect of death and dying.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In 1975, James Moody's ground-breaking book Life after Life collected the anecdotes of people who had come close to death and described the experience as comforting and transforming. Since then, the parapsychological, medical and scientific investigations of these near-death claims have become a small industry. This comprehensive report, by the author of The Adventures of a Parapsychologist and a fellow of the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal, collates theories about near-death experience, challenges the reality of spiritual claims and surveys historical and cross-cultural attitudes toward death. Blackmore concludes that the neurological ``Dying Brain Hypothesis'' better explains the evidence than the more paranormal ``Afterlife Hypothesis.'' This work is chiefly of interest to medical professionals; the mysteries of death remain. (Nov.)
School Library Journal
YA-Well documented and well researched, this volume joins the growing number of titles about the near-death experience (NDE). Blakemore's stated purpose is ``to explore what psychology, biology and medicine have to say about death and dying.'' She refers to the ground-breaking work of Raymond Moody, author of Life after Life (Bantam, 1988), and also examines the findings of many others who have studied the NDE. Numerous interviews with people who have almost died add interest to this study. The author's impartial treatment of diverse beliefs on the subject helps readers to see how scientific and spiritual points of view can coexist. There's much to think about here.-Lyn Knapp, Annandale High School, Fairfax County, VA
John Mort
Near-death experiences (NDEs) have remarkably similar characteristics the world over, leading many to cite them as proof of a hereafter. Blackmore, a British psychologist, carefully reviews the literature and her own research for something like an opposite claim. NDEs do indeed have universal aspects, but that's because they manifest the chemistry of dying brains; what's universal is the brain itself. Moreover, components of NDEs (such as "tunnels," down which the dying travel toward bright lights; sensations of well-being; and the appearance of comforting relatives from the beyond) can also be found in LSD trips and dreams. Tunnels are the most universal element of NDEs, but they, too, can be explained as chemical aberrations--brought on, in this instance, by the distress of optic nerves. Having said all this, Blackmore goes on to discuss the profound psychological--not to mention religious--impact NDEs can have on individuals, but clearly her account is valuable because it looks rationally and with as much scientific rigor as possible at this strange, almost unmeasurable phenomenon.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780879758707
Publisher:
Prometheus Books
Publication date:
09/28/1993
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
1
Product dimensions:
5.54(w) x 8.43(h) x 1.04(d)
Lexile:
1150L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

Susan Blackmore is a psychologist and writer researching consciousness, memes, and anomalous experiences, and a visiting professor at the University of Plymouth. She blogs for the Guardian and Psychology Today, and often appears on radio and  television. She is the author of Dying to Live (on near-death experiences, 1993); In Search of the Light (autobiography, 1996); Test Your Psychic Powers (with Adam Hart-Davis, 1997); The Meme Machine (1999); Conversations on Consciousness (2005); Zen and the Art of Consciousness (2011); and Consciousness: An Introduction.

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Dying to Live: Near-Death Experiences 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Writings and discussions of near-death experiences (NDEs) have historically been dominated by religious and parapsychological perspectves. Susan Blackmore's review of the subject from a more scientific perspective, taking into account recent research on consciousness, the self, and the functioning of the brain, is a welcome and refreshing contribution to this area of inquiry.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book gives every explanation for NDE except a valid afterlife. The experience is downgraded to imaginary, hallucinations and anoxia. The conclusion is there is no afterlife. What we have is here and now, nothingelse. From the first page you can tell this authors opinion. This is not a scientific book. It is propaganda and degrading for those who have had NDEs.