E-Government 2001

Overview

E-Government 2001 provides in-depth case studies of the "state" of e-government today. The book chronicles the "early days" of e-government and presents a collective snapshot in time as to where governments—at the federal, state, and local levels—are today as they continue their march toward e-government. Case studies include analysis of the use of auction models by government, privacy strategies for e-government, e-commerce applications in government, the use of the Internet to deliver government services, and a...

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Overview

E-Government 2001 provides in-depth case studies of the "state" of e-government today. The book chronicles the "early days" of e-government and presents a collective snapshot in time as to where governments—at the federal, state, and local levels—are today as they continue their march toward e-government. Case studies include analysis of the use of auction models by government, privacy strategies for e-government, e-commerce applications in government, the use of the Internet to deliver government services, and a study of how state employment agencies are using technology to provide improved service. From these case studies, Mark A. Abramson and Grady E. Means develop six initial lessons which government leaders should know before undertaking major e-government initiatives. The lessons should prove valuable to all executives who aspire to transform their organizations from traditional bureaucracies to e-enabled organizations.

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Editorial Reviews

Political Studies Review
The book provides a good overview of readers interested in the potential benefits of technological innovations and their applications for government-to-business implementations to be successful. The book is a valuable source for keeping policy-makers updated with the development of e-commerce applications within government. This is one of the few books which illustrate well the government-to-business relationship while presenting a good framework and raising open issues that governments are and will be facing in the future.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742513389
  • Publisher: The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group Inc
  • Publication date: 8/28/2001
  • Series: Price Waterhouse Coopers Endowment Series
  • Edition description: 2001
  • Edition number: 240
  • Pages: 254
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.53 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark A. Abramson is executive director of The PricewaterhouseCoopers Endowment for The Business of Government. Prior to joining the Endowment, he was chairman of Leadership Inc. Mr. Abramson served as the first president of the Council for Excellence in Government. He also served in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Grady E. Means is managing partner of the Washington Consulting Practice of PricewaterhouseCoopers. Mr. Means leads an organization that delivers complete solutions to help federal, state, and local governments succeed in today's Internet-enabled world. He served in the White House as assistant to Vice President Nelson Rockefeller for domestic policy development and at the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, where he was staff economist in the Office of the Secretary.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 The Challenge of E-Government: Initial Lessons Learned from the "Early Days" Chapter 2 The Use of the Internet in Government Service Delivery Chapter 3 Commerce Comes to Government on the Desktop: E-Commerce Applications in the Public Sector Chapter 4 The Auction Model: How the Public Sector Can Leverage the Power of E-Commerce through Dynamic Pricing Chapter 5 Privacy Strategies for Electronic Government Chapter 6 Supercharging the Employment Agency: An Investigation of the Use of Information and Communication Technology to Improve the Service of State Employment Agencies

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2002

    Lukewarm, Half-hearted & Unconvincing

    E-Government 2001 ¿ Edited By Mark A. Abramson and Grady Means This book is barely what it purports to be- ¿an in-depth (collection of) case studies of the ¿state¿ of e-government today¿. Instead. it¿s neither useful as a resource for scholars nor as a benchmarking reference for neophyte e-government consultants. At best, it¿s a quick and dirty summary of the fits and starts that some agencies have experienced in demonstrating their good intentions in practicing e-government- even as they bungle this unique opportunity. Of the numerous flaws in E-Government 2001, the most glaring is the lack of ¿ownership¿ exhibited by the co-editors, Mark Abramson and Grady Means. Nowhere is there a mention if any of the cases cited were actually managed by PwC Consulting. This oversight hurts their credibility and diminishes the book¿s value as a collection of ¿best-practices¿. Indeed, were it not for the fact that the editors are high ranking partners with the firm; one might have easily confused this work for a slap-dash term report by an undergraduate student. Another reviewer immediately recognized the lexicon that permeates the editor¿s declarations as typical of consulting ¿brochure ware¿. One has to wonder if much of the verbiage wasn¿t simply copied from the PwC website in lieu of thoughtful journalism. Were that the case; readers should simply be offered a one-page flyer, instead of a $25 book. Unfortunately, the editors failed to capitalize on the one glaring reminder of why e-government is so important to our society just now¿ ubiquitous Democracy .One would have thought that the election debacle of November 2000 would have spurred some reference to e-voting and perhaps the potential for e-mediated direct Democracy. Instead, readers are treated to a litany of inconsequential and lukewarm anecdotes that do little to support a picture of e-government revolutionizing our lives. In one instance, the history of a Motor Vehicle Administration website in Alaska is offered as a ¿best-practice¿. In that case they concede it resulted in wasteful duplication, bickering and, most astounding of all, a reorientation of focus from serving the online citizen to better serving non-Internet customers instead. Add to this outrage the specious statistics and flawed logic that permeates their conclusions, and one would have to wonder just how serious these two people are as journalists and thought-leaders. Considering that US Governments at various levels spent between $45 billion and $70 billion per annum on IT from 1998 to 2001, this reviewer hoped for a truly in-depth study of exactly where all this money has been going as well some indication as to how the next $45-$70 Billion will be spent to improve the relationship between Government and citizens as well as the businesses it¿s mandated to serve.

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