×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

E-Learning: Strategies for Delivering Knowledge in the Digital Age
     

E-Learning: Strategies for Delivering Knowledge in the Digital Age

4.5 2
by Marc Rosenberg
 

See All Formats & Editions

Internet and intranet technologies offer tremendous opportunities to bring learning into the mainstream of business. E-Learning outlines how to develop an organization-wide learning strategy based on cutting-edge technologies and explains the dramatic strategic, organizational, and technology issues involved.

Written for professionals responsible for leading the

Overview

Internet and intranet technologies offer tremendous opportunities to bring learning into the mainstream of business. E-Learning outlines how to develop an organization-wide learning strategy based on cutting-edge technologies and explains the dramatic strategic, organizational, and technology issues involved.

Written for professionals responsible for leading the revolution in workplace learning, E-Learning takes a broad, strategic perspective on corporate learning. This wake-up call for executives everywhere discusses:
• Requirements for building a viable e-learning strategy
• How online learning will change the nature of training organizations
• Knowledge management and other new forms of e-learning

Marc J. Rosenberg, Ph.D. (Hillsborough, NJ) is an independent consultant specializing in knowledge management, e-learning strategy and the reinvention of training. Prior to this, he was a senior direction and kowledge management field leader for consulting firm DiamondCluster International.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780071378093
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Education
Publication date:
11/16/2000
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
344
File size:
6 MB

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Learning Is a Lot More Than Training

The expotential growth of information that characterizes modern business makes the need for learning more important than ever. But the sheer volume of what we have to learn and the speed at which we must learn it can be daunting. So much so that old models of learning acquisition are failing us. Meeting this challenge requires new thinking about how we acquire knowledge and skill, and how we deploy learning resources that can keep up with the knowledge economy.

Learning and training are often thought of as synonymous; they are not. Training is the way instruction is conveyed; it supports learning, which is our internal way of processing information into knowledge. But since there are many ways we can learn, an effective learning strategy must transcend training.

Some dictionaries equate learning with activities such as training or education. Others use broader cognitive viewpoints like "acquired wisdom, knowledge, or skill," or scientific-sounding behavioral definitions such as "a modification of behavior as a result of experience." While all of these definitions are useful, we can go further to define learning in a way that works in the context of organizations and businesses.

What Is Learning?

In business, learning is a means to an end. Generally speaking, that end is enhanced workforce performance, which in turn reflects its value-better products and services, lower costs, a more competitive posture in the marketplace, greater innovation, improved productivity, increased market share, etc.

In the context of business, learning is the process by which people acquire new skills or knowledge for the purpose ofenhancing their performance. Companies want salespeople to learn new selling techniques so they can improve their sales results, which goes right to the business's bottom line. A hotel wants its desk clerks to learn more about customer service so they can be more helpful to guests, and, as a result, the hotel can increase occupancy rates and solidify brand loyalty. The independent plumber seeks to learn a new way to repair burst pipes so that s/he can do the job more quickly and thus handle more customers in the same amount of time. Investment houses want their stockbrokers to learn more about investment strategy so they can presumably provide a greater level of client service, while the firm can increase the amount of assets it has under management. In each case, learning enables an individual or groups of individuals to work faster, better, and smarter so that they and their organizations (or employers) reap business benefits.

The Role of Training

We have traditionally relied on training as the "default" approach to facilitating and improving performance, and instruction as the specific process that makes training work. Training/instruction is used when it is necessary to shape learning in a specific directionto support learners in acquiring a new skill or to utilize new knowledge in a specific way or to a specific level of proficiency, and perhaps within a specific time frame. Airline pilots are trained to be sure that they can demonstrate all the skills and competencies necessary to operate an airplane safely and efficiently before anyone flies with them. Surgeons are trained because of the grave consequences that might result if they practiced their craft without certification of their skills-in advance. Police officers are trained not only because society needs to be sure they are skilled, but also to be sure that they employ their skills appropriately in situations where life and death decisions are made in split seconds. Customer care representatives are trained to respond appropriately with customers every time, and technical experts are trained to fix infrastructure or systems problems quickly so our businesses run smoothly.

Training can be delivered in many ways-in the classroom, over the phone, through a computer or via satellite, to name a few. And a variety of instructional approaches are used to get the job done, including lecture, case study, simulation, drill and practice, laboratories, and small group work. In the end, training has four main elements:

1. An intent to enhance performance in a specific way, typically derived via needs assessments and reflected in learning goals and instructional objectives.

2. A design reflecting the instructional strategy that is best suited to the learning requirement and the learner's attributes, as well as the measurement strategy that gauges the effectiveness of the training.

3. The means and media by which the instruction is conveyed, which may include the classroom, a variety of technologies, independent study, or a combination of approaches.

4. In high accountability situations, a more formalized assessment or certification capability...

What People are Saying About This

Gloria Gery
Gloria Gery, Consultant in Performance Support and Learning:

Marc Rosenberg has nailed it. He surfaces the issues, realistically describes alternatives and operationalizes what a true e-learning strategy is. Good cases. Good ideas. Good writing. You need this book!

Pat Kelly
Pat Kelly, Vice President, People Development, AT&T Wireless Services

Rosenberg's vision and advice will guide corporate leaders in harnessing the power of e-learning. I will share this book with my colleagues.

Elliott Masie
Elliott Masie, President, The MASIE Center:

Marc Rosenberg is one of the key thinkers in the ever changing world of learning and technology. This book offers a pragmatic and powerful set of resources for any organization walking the sometime slippery e-learning pathway.

John W. Cone
John W. Coné, Vice President, Dell Learning, Dell Computer Corporation:

If there is any reason to fear e-learning, it's that we will fail to understand why we are doing it. This book combines the right amount of reflection on why with a heavy dose of sound advice about how to. It has a lot in common with it's subject. It's just what we need just in time.

Meet the Author

Marc J. Rosenberg is an independent consultant specializing in knowledge management, e-learning strategy, and the reinvention of training. Prior to this, he was a senior direction and kowledge management field leader for consulting firm DiamondCluster International. A popular presenter with over two decades of experience in the field, Dr. Rosenberg is also a former president of the International Society for Performance Improvement. He lives in Hillsborough, NJ.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

E-Learning: Strategies for Delivering Knowledge in the Digital Age 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a must read for executives involved in implementing Corporate University initiatives within their company.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Author Marc Rosenberg provides one of the first books devoted to strategies for developing organization-wide, online learning. He goes beyond the obvious technological challenges of Web-based training to explain that technology and content are meaningless without a culture of learning. But creating this culture means confronting dramatic strategic, organizational and political issues. In this roadmap for building and sustaining a learning culture, Rosenberg offers an essential balance between the structure of e-learning (design and technology issues) and its implementation (acceptance and support issues). His book is an impassioned wake-up call to all executives who are concerned about the future of their organizations. To begin building your company¿s culture of learning, we at getAbstract.com urge you to arm yourself with this practical, yet philosophical, manual ¿ a weapon for professionals on the front lines of the revolution in workspace learning.