×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

E-Mail.This.Book!
     

E-Mail.This.Book!

4.0 1
by Cartoon Bank
 
From e-mail to the Internet and beyond, these 85 cartoons by such notables as Robert Mankoff, Lee Lorenz, Charles Barsotti, Jack Ziegler, Roz Chast, and Arnie Levin address the perils, fun, and foibles of all manner of cyberspace activity. The accompanying CD holds the cartoons featured in the book, plus an additional 50 that can be e-mailed, faxxed, or printed out

Overview

From e-mail to the Internet and beyond, these 85 cartoons by such notables as Robert Mankoff, Lee Lorenz, Charles Barsotti, Jack Ziegler, Roz Chast, and Arnie Levin address the perils, fun, and foibles of all manner of cyberspace activity. The accompanying CD holds the cartoons featured in the book, plus an additional 50 that can be e-mailed, faxxed, or printed out in black-and-white or color.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679450856
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/01/1996
Pages:
113
Product dimensions:
6.33(w) x 7.82(h) x 0.72(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

E-Mail.This.Book! 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This collection is the most imaginative concept for one that I have seen done by New Yorker cartoon editor, Robert Mankoff. Unfortunately, the selection of the cartoons failed to take into account the rapid advance in computer savvy and awareness. So cutting edge cartoons of 1996 often seem like ancient history in 2001. On the other hand, the book contains a CD-ROM to allow you to have a digital copy of each cartoon. You are allowed as much noncommercial use as you want. The book contains 100 black and white cartoons, the CD-ROM with the 100 cartoons (many in color) plus 50 more, and directions for using the CD-ROM on a Macintosh or with Windows and e-mailing the images. There is a brief introduction by editor and contributor, Robert Mankoff. I graded the book down one star for having so many dated cartoons, down another star for having a too limited introductory essay, and down a third star for having too few cartoons on too small pages for the price. I graded it up two stars for the CD-ROM and license for personal use features. That's how I ended up at four stars. The theme of these cartoons is 'a new playground for Murphy's Law.' Some of the cartoons were probably never very funny. Was it really credible to say that a restaurant cannot serve the meals you want on time because the computer is down? I don't think so, but 2 of 100 cartoons have that theme. Jokes about getting or printing out messages by e-mail also quickly wear thin. There are too many of those in the book. Normally, I would complain about the editor selecting 16 of his own cartoons for a 100 cartoon collection, but I must agree with Mr. Mankoff that his work deserves it compared to the others. On the other hand, some of these cartoons are priceless. Here are a few of my favorites: 'America Off-Line' with a man lying in a hammock, by Robert Mankoff; 'The e-mail isn't functioning -- pass it on.' Four computer users are sitting side by side as one turns to the other, by Robert Mankoff; 'Good graphics, Dave, but the answer is still no.' A woman turning down a man proposing on his knees, holding a video of a wedding ceremony running on a portable computer, by Robert Mankoff; 'Home-Pageless' A sign held by a street person looking for a handout, by Mick Stevens; 'Marge, this is davelow@meth.smu.com and anncann@bur.com -- I met them on the Internet.' A man introducing a couple to his wife in the living room, by Michael Maslin; 'A computer virus ate my homework.' A boy explaining to his teacher, by Arnie Levin; 'The computers are fine, the staff's down.' A picture of collapsed abstract people, by Charles Barsotti; 'Nightly Lap Top Dancing' A sign in a computer store window, by P.C. Vey; 'I think I'll head back to the house for a little Net-sex and a nap.' A man to his wife on the beach, by Michael Crawford; 'Thanks pal, let me put you on my mailing list.' Street person to man giving money while typing into a portable computer, by P.C. Vey; 'Select All' and 'Select None' The thoughts of a group of men and a group of women looking at each other in a bar, by Joe Dator;