The Early 20th Century

The Early 20th Century

by Briony Ryles, Derek (EDT) Hall
     
 

So many of the things we now take for granted, including television, radio, radar, and computers, owe their origins to great periods of technological innovation that took place around the two world wars of the 20th century. This included the development of the helicopter, the jet engine, the antibiotic penicillin, and the nuclear bomb. The new science of molecular

Overview

So many of the things we now take for granted, including television, radio, radar, and computers, owe their origins to great periods of technological innovation that took place around the two world wars of the 20th century. This included the development of the helicopter, the jet engine, the antibiotic penicillin, and the nuclear bomb. The new science of molecular biology was also born, its most famous advance being the discovery of the double helix structure of the DNA molecule.

This book contains:

Clear text, photographs, and diagrams to explain the history of technological advance

Sidebars explain the relevance of concepts to the science curriculum

Many glossary terms explained on the page

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - RevaBeth Russell
Whether you are a teacher or student of science you will love this book. Each subject has a brief heading then gives a little background history and the development of that specific technology. In side bars there are curriculum connections stating how this knowledge is connected with the National Science Standards. If the teacher is well versed in each standard, this curriculum connection might not be necessary, but if the teacher is like me, this connection delivers a swift kick to the brain. The teachers and the students will learn from the precise explanations. Penicillin and antibiotics have been responsible for much of our current health in the developed world, and it was fascinating to read the history of this magic bullet. I didn't know they had a history before Alexander Fleming. Paul Ehrlich, an earlier researcher had his assistant, Mr. Sahachiro, work on different chemicals that would kill a bacterial agent, but not harm the human host. Mr. Sahachiro tested 606 chemicals before finding the one that worked. That is persistence that students should find admirable. This section also has an elegant side bar demonstrating how antibiotics work. Textbooks often take pages to attempt this explanation with less clarity. There are many topics and all are excellent. To read the pages on lasers was perfect. Not too long, or too deep, but just right. Students are to understand the properties of light according to the National Standards. It is fascinating to learn that it took until 1950 for scientists to generate a laser beam. Then that beam had to be amplified. Such work has resulted in a ruby laser that can drill a hole in a diamond. Near the end is a timeline of technology, biology/medicine/physical science, and math. It is not comprehensive, but it is good with the little snippets of great inventions from 1911 to the mid century. This book is a perfect addition to the science classroom or the library. Part of the "Technology Through the Ages" series. Reviewer: RevaBeth Russell

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933834870
Publisher:
Brown Bear Books/Joe Hollander
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Series:
Curriculum Connections: Technology Through the Ages Series
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
6.70(w) x 9.40(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

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