Early American Architecture: From the First Colonial Settlements to the National Period

Overview

Hailed as "a model of scholarship" by the Saturday Review, this comprehensive survey of domestic and public architecture ranges from early settlers' primitive cabins to Greek Revival mansions of the early 1800s. Nearly 500 illustrations complement the text, praised by The New York Times as "entertaining, vigorous, and clearly written."

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Overview

Hailed as "a model of scholarship" by the Saturday Review, this comprehensive survey of domestic and public architecture ranges from early settlers' primitive cabins to Greek Revival mansions of the early 1800s. Nearly 500 illustrations complement the text, praised by The New York Times as "entertaining, vigorous, and clearly written."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486254920
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 1/17/2011
  • Series: Dover Architecture Series
  • Pages: 640
  • Sales rank: 716,799
  • Product dimensions: 5.44 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.22 (d)

Table of Contents

FOREWORD
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Part One. Colonial Architecture: The Seventeenth Century
1. THE COLONIAL STYLES
    Introduction
    Colonial' and 'Georgian'
    Colonial styles of the eastern regions
    Their medieval character
    The Spanish Colonial style
    Primitive shelters of the first settlers
    The log-cabin myth
    The first frame houses
    The English architectural background
2. THE COLONIAL HOUSE IN NEW ENGLAND
    Basic terminology of Colonial plans and construction best studied in New England houses
    Typical house plans
    The frame and its parts
    Wall construction
    Hewing and sawing lumber
    Windows
    Roofs
    The chimney
    Front door and porch
    The hall and its furniture
    Other rooms in the Colonial house
3. NEW ENGLAND COLONIAL ARCHITECTURE
    Introduction
    The New England community
    Representative frame houses
    Stone houses
    Brick houses
    Garrisons and blockhouses
    Meeting-houses
    School and college architecture
    Boston's first Town-House
    Commercial buildings
    Tide mills and windmills
    Newport Tower
    The New England Colonial style
4. DUTCH COLONIAL ARCHITECTURE
    Early settlement
    Materials and construction
    Variants of the Dutch Colonial style
    Early New Amsterdam
    The Albany region
    The middle countries
    Dutch churches
    Flemish Colonial houses
    Long Island
    The eighteenth-century style
    Northern New Jersey
    The post-Revolutionary phase of the style
5. SOUTHERN COLONIAL ARCHITECTURE
    Early Jamestown
    Frame houses in Virginia
    Brick houses
    Typical house plans
    Important Virginia houses
    Virginia churches
    Maryland in the seventeenth century
    The Carolinas
    Log cabins
    Early Charleston
    The river plantations
Part Two. Spanish and French Colonial Architecture
6. FLORIDA AND THE SPANISH SOUTHWEST
    St. Augustine and its fort
    Indian pueblos in New Mexico
    The Governor's Palace at Santa Fe
    Mission churches of New Mexico
    Spanish missions in Texas
    The missions of Arizona
7. MISSIONS AND RANCH HOUSES OF ALTA CALIFORNIA
    Junípero Serra and the foundation of the California missions
    Life at the missions
    The mission builldings
    San Diego
    San Carlos Borromeo
    La Capilla Real at Monterey
    San Juan Capistrano
    Santa Barbara
    San Luis Rey
    Presidios and pueblos
    Spanish Colonial domestic architecture
8. FRENCH COLONIAL ARCHITECTURE OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY
    Historical background
    Founding of New Orleans
    The Illinois Country
    Materials and construction
    One-story houses
    Ursuline Convent at New Orleans
    Plantation houses of Louisiana
    The Cabildo
Part Three. Georgian Architecture: 1700-1780
9. THE EMERGENCE OF GEORGIAN
    Historical background
    The Renaissance in Europe
    The Renaissance in England
    Elizabethan
    Early Stuart
    Late Stuart
    Early Georgian
    Building practices in the colonies
    Architects
    The use of architectural books
    Amateurs
    Materials
    Plans
    Sanitation
    "Heating, cooking, and illumination"
10. THE GEORGIAN STYLE
    Its formal character
    Doorways
    Windows
    Wall treatments
    Roof treatments
    Georgian interiors
    Entrance hall and stairway
    Floor and wall treatments
    Doors and windows
    Fireplaces and chimneypieces
    Ceilings
    Georgian furniture
    Development of the Georgian style
11. EARLY GEORGIAN ARCHITECTURE IN VIRGINIA
    Economic basis
    Typical plantation
    Williamsburg
    "The Wren building, Capitol, Palace, Bruton Parish Church"
    Other buildings at Williamsburg
    Early Georgian houses
    Stratford
    Westover
    Carter's Grove
    Richard Taliaferro
    "Christ Church, Lancaster County"
12. LATE GEORGIAN ARCHITECTURE IN VIRGINIA
    The architect John Ariss
    Mount Airy
    Mount Vernon
    Pohick Church
    Late Georgian tendencies
    The two-story portico
    Brandon
    Semple House
    Jefferson and the first Monticello
    Jefferson at Williamsburg
    Jefferson's ideas about architecture
13. GEORGIAN ARCHITECTURE IN MARYLAND AND THE CAROLINAS
    Eighteenth-century Annapolis
    County houses and manor houses
    The architecture of William Buckland
    South Carolina in the eighteenth century
    The river plantations
    Carolina churches
    Urban Charleston
    Charleston houses
    The expanding frontier: Georgia and North Carolina
14. GEORGIAN PUBLIC BUILDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND
    The seaports
    Eighteenth-century Boston
    Early Georgian churches
    Boston's Town-House
    Faneuil Hall
    Newport
    The architecture of Peter Harrison
    Late Georgian churches
    New England colleges in the eighteenth century
15. GEORGIAN HOUSES IN NEW ENGLAND
    New England house plans
    Local stylisms
    The first Georgian house in America
    Portsmouth
    The Hancock House
    Shirley Place
    Royall House
    The Lindens
    Late Georgian houses
    The Federal style in New England
16. GEORGIAN ARCHITECTURE IN THE MIDDLE COLONIES
    New Sweden
    The founding of Philadelphia
    Early Georgian houses in Pennsylvania
    Late Georgian houses
    Public and institutional buildings
    Pennsylvania Dutch' architecture
    Eighteenth-century New York
    Georgian houses in New York
17. TOWARD A NATIONAL STYLE
    Neoclassicism
    The rise of scientific
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