Early Cold War Spies: The Espionage Trials that Shaped American Politics

Early Cold War Spies: The Espionage Trials that Shaped American Politics

by John Earl Haynes, Harvey Klehr
     
 

This book, first published in 2006, is a review of the major spy cases of the early Cold War.See more details below

Overview

This book, first published in 2006, is a review of the major spy cases of the early Cold War.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521857383
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
09/30/2006
Series:
Cambridge Essential Histories Series
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
264
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.75(d)

Meet the Author

John Earl Haynes is a 20th Century Political Historian in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. He is the author or editor of four books: Calvin Coolidge and the Coolidge Era: Essays on the History of the 1920s (editor, 1998); Red Scare or Red Menace? American Communism and Anticommunism in the Cold War Era (1996); Communism and Anti-Communism in the United States: An Annotated Guide to Historical Writings (1987); and Dubious Alliance: The Making of Minnesota's DFL Party (1984).

Harvey Klehr is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Politics and History at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is the author of five books, Communist Cadre: The Social Background of the American Communist Party Elite (1978); The Heyday of American Communism: The Depression Decade (1984); Biographical Dictionary of the American Left (1986); Far Left of Center: The American Radical Left Today (1988); The Amerasia Spy Case: Prelude to McCarthyism (1996). He was honored with the Emory Williams Distinguished Teaching Award for Emory College in 1983.

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction: early Cold War spy cases; 2. The precursors; 3. Elizabeth Bentley: the case of the blond spy queen; 4. The Alger Hiss - Whittaker Chambers case; 5. The atomic espionage cases; 6. Judith Coplon: the spy who got away with it; 7. The Soble-Soblen case: last of the early Cold War spy trials; 8. Conclusion: the decline of the ideological spy.

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