Early Diplomatic Negotiations of the United States With Russia
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Early Diplomatic Negotiations of the United States With Russia

by John Coffey Hildt
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally…  See more details below

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781407676753
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
01/10/2012
Pages:
206
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.44(d)

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CHAPTER III. Adams's Mission. John Quincy Adams was well fitted for the mission to Russia. As a youth he had gone there with Dana, and in diplomacy was no amateur, having been one of the secretaries to the American plenipotentiaries who negotiated the treaty of Paris, and he was afterwards minister first to Holland, then to Prussia and commissioner to Sweden.1 Adams arrived at Cronstadt, the port of St. Petersburg, on October 21, 1Soo,.2 His instructions were the same as those given to Short.8 The chief object of his mission was to secure Russia's protection of American commerce in the event of a general pacification in Europe. But there was one point upon which he had received no instruction, and that was in regard to the presents to the Russian ministers, which had up to that time been considered indispensable. And so before he left Boston Adams wrote to the secretary of state, asking if he was to make them, for, he said, " a refusal on the part of the Congress under the Confederation to comply with this custom was the occasion of Mr. Dana's returning home from St. Petersburg without being received as a public minister."4 Secretary Smith informed Adams that if he should find that the presents were customary and expected, he was authorized to make them.5 'Foster, Century of American Diplomacy, p. 250. "J. Q. Adams, Memoirs, vol. 2, p. 45; J. Q. Adams to R. Smith. Oct. 21, 1809. Despatches, Russia, vol. I, no. 3. MS., State Department Archives. "J. Madison to T. Jefferson. July 4, 1809. Letters and other Writings of James Madison, vol. 2, pp. 445-446; R. Smith to J. Q. Adams. July 20, 1809. Instructions, vol. 7, MS., State Department Archives. 'J. Q. Adams to R. Smith. July 27,1809. Despatches, Russia, vol. I, MS., State Department Archives. 'R. Smith to J...

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