Earth Strike (Star Carrier Series #1)

Earth Strike (Star Carrier Series #1)

3.9 135
by Ian Douglas, William H. Keith
     
 

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In the vein of the hit television show Battlestar Galactica comes Earth Strike—the first book in the action-packed Star Carrier science fiction series by Ian Douglas, author of the popular Inheritance, Heritage, and Legacy Trilogies and one of the most adept writers of military sf working today. Earth Strike rockets readers into a

Overview

In the vein of the hit television show Battlestar Galactica comes Earth Strike—the first book in the action-packed Star Carrier science fiction series by Ian Douglas, author of the popular Inheritance, Heritage, and Legacy Trilogies and one of the most adept writers of military sf working today. Earth Strike rockets readers into a vast  and deadly intergalactic battle, as humankind attempts to bring down an evil empire and establish itself as the new major power. Fans of Robert Heinlein’s Starship Troopers and Joe Haldeman’s The Forever War, welcome aboard the Star Carrier!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061840258
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/23/2010
Series:
Star Carrier Series , #1
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
315,245
Product dimensions:
4.26(w) x 6.86(h) x 1.05(d)

Meet the Author

Ian Douglas is one of the pseudonyms for William H. Keith, New York Times bestselling author of the popular military science fiction series The Heritage Trilogy, The Legacy Trilogy, The Inheritance Trilogy, Star Corpsman, and Star Carrier. A former naval corpsman, he lives in Pennsylvania.

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Earth Strike 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 135 reviews.
Mr_S1000D More than 1 year ago
I preferred this book to any Ian has written so far. There was a little less emphasis on the hardware and more emphasis on the trials and tribulations of the people in the story. This book is a departure from the main theme Ian has developed in his other books which have a main theme of Star Marines meet bad-boy aliens and out wit them at a scenario similar to World War II Midway. Overall, this switch to the life on board the equivalent of an aircraft carrier is superior to his other stories simply because I felt I could relate to the situation a little better (a little less "oo-rah" - no offense to Marines, I just could relate a little better to characters who don't have a continual chip on their shoulder because of time differentials). If you like shoot-em up sci-fi, this is a book for you. If you also like getting inside the world of the future and what politics and military interplay might be like, this book is something you will enjoy. Since Ian is big on series/legacy stories and I'm assuming you'd probably like books in a similar vien, take a look at Jack Campbell's series on "The Lost Fleet". Start with "Dauntless" though, it'll help make sense out of the rest of the books in the series.
buzzpark More than 1 year ago
If you loved the Heritage, Legacy, and Inheritance series, then you'll love this. There's nothing really new here per se. Though Earth Carrier is set in a different universe than that of the Xul, you'll find the exact same type of characters, science, and plots as before. Earth Carrier is from the perspective of space fighter pilots, rather than space Marines. The action is very fun and the characters enjoyable. Who doesn't love the occasional "Politicians are Stupid", "Civilians are Ignorant", "Admiral/General Knows Best", and "Humans Outwit their Technologically Superior Alien Foes" story? While there is nothing too deep here, this is Saturday Matinee SciFi escapism of the first degree, and I cannot wait for Star Carrier II to hit the virtual shelves.
AnastasiaVPergakis More than 1 year ago
I'm a huge fan of military science fiction - of any military fiction really - but this book severely disappointed me. No, not because of the military aspect at all. That was really one of the few saving graces about this book that kept me reading until the end. The characters were cookie cutter types. Admiral Koenig, while a major player in the plot - well I couldn't have a personal connection with the guy. He was just, there. And, I'm all for women heroes, tough chicks who kick butt, but Commander Allyn again was also just there. No real depth to her as a "person" she was just a fighter pilot and without the use of "she" I probably would have never noticed she was a woman honestly. The only character (and saving grace #2) that had any depth, was Lieutenant Gray. While there were other saving graces to this story, he really was the main reason why I continued the read the book. I wanted to know what happened to him. Even with that, I still felt he could have been developed 'more'. After all, I have no idea what he looks like - at all. If the characters were described in physical appearance at all during the story, I missed it due to the overwhelming details of the technology. Maybe I just prefer the "softer" types of sci-fi stories. Even still, I don't feel the need to take up multiple paragraphs and in some cases multiple pages, to explain to me how each individual type of ship, weapon, and tech works. And not only do that, but do it repeatedly for the same piece of equipment. The sad part was, not only was it repeated, it was repeated almost verbatim every time. The same words, in the same order. The third and final saving grace of this story was the fight scenes. And if the over use and repetition of the technology during these scenes was taken out, they would be even better. I didn't necessarily hate the story - the basic plot was a good one and the fight scenes kept me interested. I don't think I'll read any more books from this series though, as the over-detail and cookie cutter characters just don't make it worth my while to figure out what else happens in the series arc.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ian Douglas doesn't dissapoint people looking for a true military flavored sci-fi. Suprisingly detailed descriptions of FTL drives and the complex physics of space. He really captures life as a pilot and even an admiral of the fleet. You will be given percpectives of the same battles from nearly every angle. Amazing book. The battle sequences are intense and certainly not short lived.
romantic_fool More than 1 year ago
I like my Sci-Fi to be hard, not fairies or vampires and the Star Carrier series is that. I very much enjoy the story as focused between the main characters Admiral Koenig and Lt. Gray. The novel is a good length but at least half is repeatedly re-telling detailing acronyms re-explaining background details which gets very tiresome and I find myself skipping ahead everytime I come across them. That being said it is still an excellent alternative to Star Trek and Star Wars universes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book had great potential to be a page turner. Instead, the author got so caught up in the science that he drownds out the story. To many times he breaks away from the action to detail the physics of the ships and the ships systems.
Sagat More than 1 year ago
He is always a great read combining hard science a real military facts for a great book. I would suggest his other books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good character development...fun read.
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tnpir4002 More than 1 year ago
I picked up this book one day more or less on a whim, I was intrigued by the cover art and the blurb on the back cover, and so I decided, "Why not?" In this first installment of Douglas' series, I was very impressed by the author's descriptions and depictions of humanity fighting a war with such formidable enemies. Unlike other sci-fi franchises, this outing stays true to the laws of physics as we understand them, and fully justifies any workarounds employed humanity. As a longtime reader and watcher of Star Trek, I couldn't help but find this change of pace a bit refreshing. If Douglas does have one weakness, it's his tendency to work in too much background information to the narrative. A single battle can stretch across multiple chapters for that reason--a problem that seemed to only get worse in later books. I'll call particular attention to the Wormwood asteroid strike, an event that finds itself continually (and endlessly) referenced, in almost any scenario that involves space combat or involvement by multinational forces. I found myself skipping entire pages without really feeling like I missed any of the story. Despite these flaws, this book (and, for the record, the one that follows) maintains an exceptionally high reread value.
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ZeroCore More than 1 year ago
For those who love Miltary Sci-Fi this book is for you. From tatics to the interaction of the soldiers this book screams military.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Like the series so far. Good levels of detai about the physics of space warfare with interesting characters to follow. Would recommend if you are a fan of battle star galactica or looking for a book that keeps you engaged.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really liked being thrown into the middle of an interstellar war. Great tech and enjoyable characters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Seemed slow in the beginning as there seems to be a lpt of background. It does pick up and grabs your attention. The background transformation of Trevor is noteworthy. I'm continuing with the series!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was looking a book that i could read without worrying about a deeper meaning in and i hit the jackpot in this series. The characters and plot are all flat and rather predictable. The main character is a misunderstood outcast with an authority problem. The secondary main character, the admiral, must buck a corrupt, enemy appeasing goverment to do what is right to save the planet. Of course the goverment is donimated by Europe and the main characters all come from the US of A. But for what i wanted and what it is its readable even if i do have to roll my eyes at some rather simplistic political ideas. To make a long story short: its OK
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