Earthquakes

Earthquakes

by Trudi Strain Trueit
     
 

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About once every 30 seconds an earthquake, often too weak for us to feel, rumbles through the planet. This book looks at how seismologists study large and small earthquakes in order to understand their origins, causes, and destructive effects.

Overview

About once every 30 seconds an earthquake, often too weak for us to feel, rumbles through the planet. This book looks at how seismologists study large and small earthquakes in order to understand their origins, causes, and destructive effects.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
One of the most frightening acts of nature is an earthquake. Although certain areas are prone to them, earthquakes can happen anyplace and can be mild or devastating. In this book, one of the "Watts Library" books about earth science, earthquakes are examined and explained. The book begins with what causes earthquakes, how they are measured, how they are predicted and what to do if caught in one. Scientific information, like the three types of waves that occur during an earthquake, is combined with historical facts. For instance, the Chinese invented the first seismograph in 132 A.D. The book draws on a variety of examples, including the well-known earthquakes in Kobe, Japan, and the World Series earthquake in San Francisco, as well as lesser-known quakes such as the one that hit Prince William Sound in 1964, the largest ever in the United States. One fascinating picture shows an Indonesian village street littered with giant tuna after a tsunami. The book is an excellent resource for preteens; it is informative and interesting. Earthquakes serves both as a resource with a complete index and as an interesting read from beginning to end. 2003, Franklin Watts/Scholastic,
— Heather Robertson <%ISBN%>0531121976
VOYA
Vivid photographs and exciting narratives enliven these two books by Trudi Trueit. Black Sunday, the day that Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, is the subject of the first chapter in Volcanoes. The photo of volcanologist David Johnston in the field, taken one day before the eruption, is followed by his dialogue with the main observatory moments before he is buried beneath tons of mud and ash, making volcanoes alive and exciting for the reader. In a similar manner Earthquakes begins with a scenario of the 1995 earthquake in Kobe, Japan. Photographs illustrate the destruction of earthquakes in Japan, Turkey, California, and Alaska. Photos of active and dormant volcanoes from various parts of the world include descriptions of different types of lava. Both volumes portray scientists on the job with vivid photos and lively text, whether outside monitoring an active volcano or in the laboratory analyzing seismic data. Definitions are embedded in the text and in a glossary. Traditional information on measuring and classifying earthquakes and volcanoes are illustrated with maps, diagrams, and charts. Volcanoes has a colored diagram showing the evolution of a volcano, and Earthquakes features an informative diagram comparing and classifying quakes. The large print and beautiful illustrations will encourage students of all ages or provide a quick illustrative reference for the teacher or librarian. Other titles in the series cover clouds, the water cycle, fossils, and more,
— Marilyn Brien

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531121979
Publisher:
Scholastic Library Publishing
Publication date:
03/01/2003
Series:
Watts Library
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
7.96(w) x 9.56(h) x 0.39(d)
Lexile:
1190L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

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