East Autumn Grin

East Autumn Grin

by Matthew Ryan
     
 

A goodly number of singer-songwriters choose to go the confessional route, forgetting that reading diary entries from someone you know nothing about isn't all that interesting. The key to overcoming that, of course, is to establish the kind of connection that makes listeners feel that their own inner struggles -- not merely those of the troubadour -- are actually…  See more details below

Overview

A goodly number of singer-songwriters choose to go the confessional route, forgetting that reading diary entries from someone you know nothing about isn't all that interesting. The key to overcoming that, of course, is to establish the kind of connection that makes listeners feel that their own inner struggles -- not merely those of the troubadour -- are actually being laid out in front of them. Matthew Ryan has a gift for doing just that, and on his second album, he shares that gift with a generosity and aplomb that far exceeds his 28 years. On songs such as the keenly observational "I Hear a Symphony" (no relation to the Supremes' classic) and the stormy (no pun intended) "Heartache Weather," Ryan's earthy rasp conveys a wizened pain -- and a surprising degree of tenderness. That blend is further stirred by the presence of former Concrete Blonde singer Johnette Napolitano, who duets with Ryan on "Sunk" and the Dylanesque "The World Is on Fire." The introspection inherent in Ryan's tales does not, however, extend to the sonic aspects of East Autumn Grin, which is shot through with a ragged-but-right vein of heartland rock that strikes a balance between the "big music" of the Waterboys and the smart swagger of Soul Asylum (whose Dave Pirner spurs "Ballad of a Limping Man" with a surprising turn on trumpet).

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Denise Sullivan
His first album drew comparisons from critics to greats like Dylan and Springsteen and near-greats like Paul Westerberg; on the all important follow-up, Matthew Ryan stacks up with the pretty-goods like John Mellencamp and Soul Asylum's Dave Pirner. It's fitting then that Pirner sits in (on trumpet!) on the dark folk "Ballad of a Limping Man." He's not the only name performer who dropped by to beef up the already big music: Johnette Napolitano sings and David & David's David Ricketts does multi-instrumental work. Underneath the Dylan-derived delivery and state-of-the-art studio embellishments lives a songwriter and his simple songs trying to get out.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/15/2000
Label:
A&M
UPC:
0606949071127
catalogNumber:
490711

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Matthew Ryan   Primary Artist,Synthesizer,Acoustic Guitar,Vocals
Chris Feinstein   Bass,Bass (Vocal)
Ethan Johns   Percussion,Drums
Doug Lancio   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
Johnette Napolitano   Bass (Vocal),Vocals
Dave Pirner   Trumpet
David Ricketts   Synthesizer,Piano,Electric Guitar,Hammond Organ
Paul Slivka   Bass
Trina Shoemaker   Bass (Vocal)
David Henry   Cello
Will Kimbrough   Piano,Omnichord
Richard McLaurin   Hammond Organ
Josh Rouse   Bass (Vocal)
Tom Williams   Percussion,Bass (Vocal),Drums,Snare Drums
Pat Sansone   Piano

Technical Credits

Trina Shoemaker   Producer,Engineer
Jeri Heiden   Art Direction
Will Kimbrough   Feedback
Carl Meadows   Engineer
Matthew Ryan   Producer

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