BN.com Gift Guide

East to America: Korean American Life Stories

Overview

In this collection of powerful, candid oral histories, a wide cross section of Korean Americans render a portrait of a community grappling with racial tensions, class and gender differences, and differing notions of family and honor.

In a surprisingly candid collection of profiles that speaks to every American, activists and scholars Elaine Kim and Eui Young Yu bring to light what the media have not: the genuine complexity of the Korean American community. From San ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (24) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $7.40   
  • Used (23) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$7.40
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(345)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1996 Hardcover Brand New. 100% Money Back Guarantee! Ships within 1 business day, includes tracking. Carefully packed. Serving satisfied customers since 1987.

Ships from: Darby, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

In this collection of powerful, candid oral histories, a wide cross section of Korean Americans render a portrait of a community grappling with racial tensions, class and gender differences, and differing notions of family and honor.

In a surprisingly candid collection of profiles that speaks to every American, activists and scholars Elaine Kim and Eui Young Yu bring to light what the media have not: the genuine complexity of the Korean American community. From San Francisco to New York, from Chicago to the book's focal point, Los Angeles, this first full-scale history of the Korean-American community includes a wide spectrum of people and their stories.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
During the 1992 Los Angeles riots, Koreatown was the target of burning and looting by many blacks whose resentment exploded against Korean shopkeepers; blacks charged that the Koreans exploited them, treated them badly and flaunted their superiority. Kim and Yu, both Korean Americans who teach at California colleges, set out to reform these images of their people in some 50 engrossing interviews with a cross section of the Korean American community. These movingly reveal a culture and history of people victimized both in their native land and in the U.S. Most were brought here as children in the 1970s after the Korean War by parents fiercely determined to make a better life; others are American-born. All display a strong sense of filial duty and respect for education, hard work and success; most feel a sense of commonality with blacks but confess that their culturally imprinted emotional reserve invites misinterpretation. While race relations are not the only focus of these interviews, they are a prominent concern. A Korean American police officer present during the riots observes that Korean Americans did not realize the magnitude of black hostility toward them. But he also says that a sense of victimization does no one any good: "So what if you`re a victim," he says coolly. "Get in line, there are 10,000 victims ahead of you." (Mar.)
School Library Journal
YA-One of the many consequences of the Rodney King verdict was TV images of desperate Korean shop owners during the LA riots defending their property with guns. This book is a direct result of the author's desire to replace those images with a more complete picture of Korean-Americans, showing, through the words of the Korean-Americans themselves, that they have as many different life stories to tell as any other ethnic group. These 38 interviews include a Korean adopted as a baby by white Americans, a rap artist, a journalist, a gay activist, several inner-city shop owners, a widow, an abused wife, and a charity volunteer. The book's usefulness lies in exposing students, especially those of Korean descent, to Korean-Americans' recent history, culture, and heritage. It can also serve as background reading for multicultural issues.-Judy McAloon, Potomac Library, Prince William County, VA
Booknews
Presents candid interviews with some 30 Koreans ranging from recent immigrants to third-generation Korean-American gay activists, artists, crime victims, shopkeepers, and mixed-race Koreans grappling with issues such as racial tension, class and gender differences, family, and home. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Kirkus Reviews
This diverse series of interviews with Korean-Americans grew out of the editors' reaction to the media portrayal of "inarticulate aliens" during the 1992 Los Angeles riots.

Kim (Asian-American Studies/Univ. of California, Berkeley) and Yu (Sociology/Calif. State Univ., Los Angeles) successfully offer a "glimpse of some Korean American perspectives on history, identity, and community." As with all immigrant groups, the editors note, some Koreans see America as "a promised land"; to others "it is purgatory." James Park found a sanctuary here. He describes a miserable childhood in the 1940s and '50s, spanning the Japanese occupation of Korea and the North-South conflict, during which his mother died "because of my father's neglect." In 1969 he left for the US as a foreign-exchange student; today he is a prominent Los Angeles importer-exporter. Dong Hwan Ku (a pseudonym) has a different perspective. He came to this country in 1984 and owns a small sundries store near an unnamed college campus. "I am scared everyday," he says, recalling how he fired warning shots during the 1992 looting. He sees no solution to the violence and animosity between local black residents and the Korean business community. He wants to go home. Others, such as Kyong-A Price, have found answers and peace. A "troubled woman" who attempted suicide several times, Buddhist Price felt spiritually at odds with her Anglo-Christian husband. Then, like many Korean-Americans, Price became born-again and "accepted Jesus Christ." As Kim and Yu note, there are 3,000 Korean Christian churches in the US but only 650 Buddhist temples. The church has become the single most important community organization.

A window into a little-known community and a wide variety of people—a gay activist, a rapper, a monk—along with an excellent overview of Korean and Korean-American history.

From the Publisher

"Fascinating . . . [East to America] provides a panoramic view of the Korean community." &#8212Los Angeles Times

"A riveting book! . . . The new history of the West." &#8212San Jose Mercury News

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781565842977
  • Publisher: New Press, The
  • Publication date: 2/28/1996
  • Pages: 408
  • Product dimensions: 6.47 (w) x 9.57 (h) x 1.49 (d)

Meet the Author


Elaine H. Kim is a professor of Asian American studies and chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Her previous books include Asian American Literature: An Introduction to the Writings and Their Social Context. She lives in Oakland, California.

Eui-Young Yu is a professor of sociology at California State University, Los Angeles. He is the editor of Black-Korean Encounter: Toward Understanding and Alliance. He lives in Los Angeles.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Urban Impressionist 1
Dirty Laundry 25
War Zone 36
Launched 42
Revitalizing America 54
Hot Pepper 63
Spiritual Tension 73
Multiple-Box Person 81
Causal Connection 90
Distorted History 97
Tasting America 107
Chino 114
Starting From Zero 129
Dragon 139
Tommy's Mother 146
Away From the Center 154
A Humble Messenger 164
A Seeker and a Fighter 174
Strong Determination 180
No Spokesperson 187
House of Haesun 195
Getting Real 207
Cruise Control 219
Head of Household 230
Non-Traditional and Korean 236
Second Homeland 244
Love Letter From a Stranger 252
Hanging Onto My Dream 260
One Chapter a Day 266
Man of the House 274
Pilgrimage 282
Born to Be a Soldier 294
Adopted 306
Black and Korean 314
Year of the Sheep 322
A Higher Ground 329
Perpetually Marginal 336
As American as Possible 342
Appendix A Elaine H. Kim 353
Appendix B Eui-Young Yu 359
Appendix C Brief Overview of Korean and Korean American History 363
Notes 375
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)