Eat Bacon, Don't Jog: Get Strong. Get Lean. No Bullshit.

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Overview

This is your brain on Grant Petersen: Every comfortable assumption you have about a subject is turned upside down, and by the time you finish reading you feel challenged, energized, and smarter. In Just Ride—“the bible for bicycle riders” (Dave Eggers, New York Times Book Review)—Petersen debunked the bicycle racing– industrial complex and led readers back to the simple joys of getting on a bike.

In Eat Bacon, Don’t Jog, Petersen upends the ...

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Eat Bacon, Don't Jog: Get Strong. Get Lean. No Bullshit.

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Overview

This is your brain on Grant Petersen: Every comfortable assumption you have about a subject is turned upside down, and by the time you finish reading you feel challenged, energized, and smarter. In Just Ride—“the bible for bicycle riders” (Dave Eggers, New York Times Book Review)—Petersen debunked the bicycle racing– industrial complex and led readers back to the simple joys of getting on a bike.

In Eat Bacon, Don’t Jog, Petersen upends the last 30 years of conventional health wisdom to offer a clear path to weight loss and fitness. In more than 100 short, compelling directives, Eat Bacon, Don’t Jog shows why we should drop the carbs, embrace fat, and hang up our running shoes, with the latest science to back up its claims.

Diet and Exercise make up the bulk of the book, with food addressed in essays such as “Carbohydrate Primer”—and why it’s okay to eat less kale—and “You’ll Eat Less Often If You Eat More Fat.” The exercise chapters begin with “Don’t Jog” (it just makes you hungry and trains muscle to tolerate more jogging while raising stressors like cortisol) and lead to a series of interval-training exercises and a suite of kettlebell lifts that greatly enhance strength and endurance.

The balance of the book explains the science of nutrition and includes more than a dozen simple and delicious carb-free recipes.

Thirty years ago Grant Petersen was an oat-bran-, egg-white-, lean-meat-eating exercise fanatic who wasn’t in great shape despite all that. Today, at sixty, he is in the best shape of his life with the blood panel to prove it.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
07/21/2014
Combining a low-carb diet, advice usually given to diabetics, and common sense, Peterson’s low-cost approach to wellness offers well-worn concepts in an easily digestible form. Over the course of 100-plus mini-chapters, Peterson (Just Ride) shows readers how to take better control of their health by drastically reducing their carb intake while upping their protein intake, exercising (though not jogging), recalibrating their taste buds, and learning to manage their glucose levels—all to stave off diabetes and minimize weight (and fat) gain. Avid consumers of diet and exercise books, magazines, and TV shows will find few new ideas; many of Peterson’s exercises—such as pull-ups, squat-thrusts, sit-ups, and kettlebell routines—are standard. Though tips such as cutting back on salt, eating oily fish, and avoiding sugars certainly won’t do readers any harm, those looking for an innovative approach will likely leave wanting. Would-be gym rats with a low tolerance for reading—most chapters are barely a page—are the most likely to enjoy this breezy approach to fitness. Illus. (Jan.)
Library Journal
11/15/2014
Conventional wisdom dictates that one should seek health advice from a trained professional. Although Petersen (owner, Rivendell Bicycle Works; Just Ride) is not a health care professional—and even states this fact in a disclaimer—his book challenges readers to evaluate their diet and exercise habits. Indeed, the title is sure to elicit its fair share of eye rolling, yet it appears that many of Petersen's claims have support from the health and fitness community. Sample drills, delicious recipes, and other attainable eating suggestions offer possible alternatives to fad diets and activities that have proven ineffective. Whether the author is discussing the correlation between carbohydrates and weight gain or more efficient ways to workout, he will enlighten some readers while frustrating others. Some readers might treat this volume like a handy instruction manual for well-being. Its concise chapters and compact size make it an easily transported reference tool. VERDICT When the usual diet and exercise routines have flopped, this unusual approach to healthy living might be worth investigating.—Chad Clark, Lamar State Coll. Lib., Port Arthur, TX
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761180548
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/18/2014
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 47,929
  • Product dimensions: 4.40 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Grant Petersen is the founder and owner of Rivendell Bicycle Works. He has been featured in Outside and Men’s Journal, among other magazines. He lives with his family in Walnut Creek, California, and online at Rivbike.com. 

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 18, 2015

    You've heard of the low-carb diet: This is the no-carb diet. Ins

    You've heard of the low-carb diet: This is the no-carb diet. Instead of recommending a diet based on protein, though, author Petersen (of Rivendell Bicycle Works fame) pushes beyond puny paleo diets into a realm few even dared to imagine: A diet based on eating fat. Yum.




    In establishing the reasoning behind his dietary recommendations, Petersen looks at human history and evolution, and punctures the whole grains and fresh fruits myths, among others. The results, according to Petersen, are weight loss (you still have to do some physical activity, of course), avoiding (or healing yourself from) diabetes, safeguarding yourself from cancer, and possibly protecting yourself from Alzheimer's.




    The catch is you have to go on a diet that's not just gluten free, but carb-free, to the extent that this is possible. Once you can imagine a diet with zero grains or sugars, you're about half-way there. The goal is to get your body into a state of ketosis, where it burns fat for energy and not carbohydrates. It's not a starvation diet, though. Petersen makes numerous recommendations, offers some recipes in the back, and provides a list of sources for further study.




    Far from being a kookie fad diet, Petersen seems accurately to describe what so many of us go through. You exercise to lose weight, but the more you exercise, the hungrier you get. So, you eat more, thinking you can just exercise it off. The problem -- in addition to the fact that you've created a vicious cycle for yourself -- is that many people will never get ahead of the curve on this regime because the very nature of the foods they eat makes it impossible to lose weight.




    Petersen's diet provides a way of breaking the cycle while eating healthy foods. Best of all, he promises that once your body adopts your new diet, maintaining your new lower weight will be easy because you will be eating less and having fewer food cravings.




    Petersen offers some suggestions on the exercise front, as well, including body-weight exercises for those who don't want to buy exercise equipment, and kettle-ball exercises for those who do.




    For self-monitoring, Petersen recommends testing one's blood, as opposed to measuring body fat percentages, or referring to standardized charts of height and weight.




    There are two puzzling things about this diet, however.




    First, where sweeter is called for, Petersen recommends using one of the many artificial (synthetic or hyper-processed) sweeteners on the market, which seems a disconnect. He doesn't even mention honey or molasses, either as being tolerable or awful.




    Second, there is no mention of fluid intake. My guess is that Petersen is in the "drink when you're thirsty" camp, but there are some people who don't feel thirsty even though their lips are cracked and peeling and their backs are in agony because their intervertebral discs are dehydrated and compressed.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2014

    The beauty of Grant Petersen's new book "Eat Bacon, Don't J

    The beauty of Grant Petersen's new book "Eat Bacon, Don't Jog" is the clarity and simplicity of its short, digestible chapters. Grant has summarized a lot of the thinking espoused by those in the low-carb and paleo diet research movement, including that of Gary Taubes, but infuses it with his own observations about diet and exercise, and a writing style that has has earned his Rivendell Readers (about bikes) and his last book "Just Ride" a dedicated following.

    Each chapter is its own self-contained lesson and, although there's room for disagreement, as the subtitle says, there's "No Bulls***."

    The "Don't Jog" part is not an invitation to sit on the couch, it's part of his demonstration that exercise has its own benefits, but it doesn't lead to weight loss, a low-carb, good-fat heavy diet does. On the exercise side, he points out that short strenuous exercises to the point of exhaustion are what builds good health; jog if you want to for the meditation effects, but not to get fit faster or slim down.I'd give it a sixth star if it had a more kosher-friendly title, and would buy another version that said "Eat Pastrami, Don't Jog."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2015

    Wow

    Long headline. Dont eat too much bacon though. Youll still die of diabeties.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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