Eat Tweet: 1,020 Recipe Gems from the Twitter Community's @cookbook

Overview

The first-ever Twitter cookbook—filled with 1000 recipes for great eats and special tweats...

The New York Times called tweeted recipes quite possibly the "first great recipe innovation in 200 years"—then crowned microblogger Maureen Evans the queen of the genre. This talented home cook has a knack for boiling down recipes to their essence: every single step and ingredient is condensed to Twitter's maximum of 140 characters or fewer, and not a single keystroke more. Eat ...

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Overview

The first-ever Twitter cookbook—filled with 1000 recipes for great eats and special tweats...

The New York Times called tweeted recipes quite possibly the "first great recipe innovation in 200 years"—then crowned microblogger Maureen Evans the queen of the genre. This talented home cook has a knack for boiling down recipes to their essence: every single step and ingredient is condensed to Twitter's maximum of 140 characters or fewer, and not a single keystroke more. Eat Tweet—the first ever Twitter book of recipes—is like a shorthand sous-chef. Part of the fun lies in decoding the author's clever recipe tweets, each one a model of clarity and usefulness. But this one-stop compendium of curated recipes and food ideas is so much more. There are recipes from around the world, from Kashgar Noodles to Biscotti, as well as homey favorites like Garlic Chicken and Chocolate. In addition, Eat Tweet contains kitchen tips and techniques (also 140 characters max) and a lexicon for translating Twitterese cooking terms like s+p (salt and pepper) and tst (toasted). From Lemon Lentil Soup to Pumpkin Pie, it's like a shelf of cookbooks in one tasty volume.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781579654269
  • Publisher: Artisan
  • Publication date: 9/16/2010
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 6.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Maureen Evans is a prolific amateur cook and traveler who tweets recipes from around the world to her thousands of followers on Twitter. When not cooking or tweeting, this Canadian native can be found studying for her master's in creative writing at Queen's University, Belfast. She lives with her partner, Blaine Cook, who was the lead programmer on Twitter.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 8, 2011

    Bringing new media to paper in style

    I saw this book in Urban Outfitters and I immediately wondered: is this complete pop culture insanity or certified genius?

    Maureen Evans had an advantage over most people to come up with something like this, being the girlfriend of Twitter developer Blaine Cook, but I'm not sure that really matters so much as the potential of the extreme dialect of txt_spk she developed for her @cookbook project. The remarkable level of information density she pulls off (including translations of such classics as Julia Child's boeuf bourgignon and Jim Lahey's no-knead bread) is a gift to recipe exchangers -- rather than relying on email or redirect services, a quick-on-the-draw cook can send a favorite recipe by text message. I have a couple of quibbles -- some of the terms she uses aren't quite as abbreviated as they could be, and the use of fraction glyphs is problematic for any application that doesn't support Unicode (unfortunately, notation this dense isn't very metric-friendly) -- but for the most part Evans has created something with some real value for amateur cooks.

    However, though the real star of this book is the notation, what might get lost in the novelty of it all is this: this is actually a pretty solid general kitchen cookbook. There's over a thousand recipes crammed into the ~260 pages of the book, and they cover a satisfyingly broad, strongly international selection of just the basics. Although it's perhaps a bit more for an advanced cook than, say, Joy of Cooking, it's both inexpensive and reasonably comprehensive. The notation takes a bit of getting used to, but the glossary is comprehensive and there's plenty of (plain English) notes to help you through.

    So, in conclusion, yeah, it's pretty nuts, but it's amazing how the strangest and silliest things sometimes prove themselves to be very useful indeed. This book would be particularly good for a teenager or college student learning to cook, but really anyone with a bit of patience can get plenty of use out of it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2010

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