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Eat When You Feel Sad
     

Eat When You Feel Sad

5.0 1
by Zachary German
 
All the sad young pop-culture-saturated hyperliterary men mope their way under our skin, one deadpan, declarative sentence at a time

Eat When You Feel Sad is a novel about Robert. Eat When You Feel Sad is a novel about a generation. Robert was born in the 1980s. He was born in the United States of America. In Eat When You Feel Sad, Robert

Overview

All the sad young pop-culture-saturated hyperliterary men mope their way under our skin, one deadpan, declarative sentence at a time

Eat When You Feel Sad is a novel about Robert. Eat When You Feel Sad is a novel about a generation. Robert was born in the 1980s. He was born in the United States of America. In Eat When You Feel Sad, Robert feeds his cat, watches television and drinks beer. In Eat When You Feel Sad, Robert gets mustard on his clothes, rides a bicycle and talks on Gmail chat. Eat When You Feel Sad takes place in cars, houses, and apartments. Eat When You Feel Sad takes place in a school, a community center, and several Chinese restaurants. Eat When You Feel Sad is a selection of scenes from a life.

Eat When You Feel Sad will be found on a short shelf of short literary novels that includes Bret Easton Ellis's Less than Zero and Tao Lin's Eeeee Eee Eeee--where young people seek their own reflection, and face reality with humor and hope.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Moving, funny, emotional, and—in a revolutionary way—both highly-readable and avant-garde, Eat When You Feel Sad excites me very much in terms of literature and also life itself.”
—Tao Lin

“Zachary German’s nimble, catwalking, archeological, surface dwelling, emotionally unpaved prose is a thing of total wonder and my favorite drug, language-based or otherwise. Eat When You Feel Sad is so bright and pleasurable and full of excellence, it’s positively serene.”
—Dennis Cooper
Publishers Weekly
German's debut novel follows protagonist Robert, an emaciated vegan, through the always relevant trials and tribulations of growing up. German's writing is comprised entirely of short, staccato sentences: "Robert is riding his bike. He's wearing a sweater. There is a red light. Robert stops riding his bike." Through this stylized writing, readers follow Robert from a suburban childhood of listening to records, smoking pot and stealing from a bookstore to his first sexual experience with girlfriend Alison ("Robert and Alison have sex. They finish having sex."), and finally a move to a nameless city and the unavoidable struggle to find himself. Robert tries kissing guys, making carrot juice, and plenty of drinking and getting stoned, but doesn't ever find what he's searching for. The complications of life seem to fly by him with little consequence. The book has many charms, even though German's minimalist style of writing-clearly mimicking his main character's view of life-can be a bit daunting. The deadpan delivery does add humor to Robert's daily routine, and the unromanticized life of a twenty-something hipster is a refreshing change of pace from the usual way that such creatures are portrayed.
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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933633855
Publisher:
Melville House Publishing
Publication date:
02/09/2010
Pages:
127
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.50(d)

Meet the Author

Zachary German was born on December 17th, 1988, at Shore Memorial Hospital, in Sompers Point, New Jersey. He has two blogs: zacharygerman.com and thingswhatibought.blogspot.com

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Eat When You Feel Sad 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
kdsjhfgskdjgh More than 1 year ago
This book has accomplished making a very genre topic (life) extremely fascinating without using any of the conventional literary devices. There is no climax...no plot to speak of...no WOW ending...and yet I couldn't put it down. It's written in an almost "see-spot-run" sort of way, it's extremely avant garde. It's the Perks of Being a Wallflower without any twists or intense character study. It's just so relatable if you are in your early to mid twenties and considered by your peers as a "hipster."