Eat Your Science Homework: Recipes for Inquiring Minds

Eat Your Science Homework: Recipes for Inquiring Minds

by Ann McCallum, Leeza Hernandez
     
 

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Hungry readers discover delicious and distinct recipes in this witty companion to Eat Your Math Homework. A main text explains upper-elementary science concepts, including subatomic particles, acids and bases, black holes, and more. Alongside simple recipes, side-bars encourage readers to also experiment and explore outside of the kitchen. A review, glossary, and

Overview

Hungry readers discover delicious and distinct recipes in this witty companion to Eat Your Math Homework. A main text explains upper-elementary science concepts, including subatomic particles, acids and bases, black holes, and more. Alongside simple recipes, side-bars encourage readers to also experiment and explore outside of the kitchen. A review, glossary, and index make the entire book easy to digest.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for Eat Your Math Homework: "A yummy way to get parents and kids to more deeply understand math . . . and spend some time together in the kitchen."—Kirkus Reviews
"Mischievous, gap-toothed bunnies rendered in mixed-media collage explore math in the kitchen in this clever activity book."—Publishers Weekly
"Bring math learning into the classroom or family kitchen in a lively way."—School Library Journal
"Witty and smart, this unusually upbeat math book offers edible rewards for learning."—Booklist
School Library Journal
09/01/2014
Gr 4–8—A creative work that gives readers an opportunity to experience scientific terms and processes with familiar objects and recipes. For instance, a salad dressing comprised of oil and vinegar makes for a fun lesson about the properties of matter, chemical reactions are demonstrated with invisible ink on sandwiches, and lasagna provides a way to observe sedimentary layers. Scientific terms are explained in each chapter, and recipes are given and reinforced with a glossary. Bright illustrations and clear instructions will appeal to younger readers, while older readers will find the concepts and vocabulary educational; the recipes will appeal to a wide range of ages. An accessible and engaging title that should please even reluctant readers.—Denise Moore, O'Gorman Junior High School, Sioux Falls, SD
Kirkus Reviews
2014-06-04
Science concepts are appetizingly presented with relevant recipes.The math-teaching author of Eat Your Math Homework, also illustrated by Hernandez (2011), follows up with six edible demonstrations of scientific ideas from chemistry, forensic science, geology and astrophysics. The connection is sometimes straightforward (Sedimentary Pizza Lasagna does retain the layers of sedimentary rock) but sometimes not. Three Atomic Popcorn Balls will make a model water molecule, but what do you do with the other balls? You’d need more colors than the suggested two to make many other kinds of molecules. The fingerprints pressed into the edges of Loop, Whorl, and Arch Cookies will disappear in the cooking process. The science explanations aren’t clear, either. A lengthy description of invisible ink mentions the chemical change involved, but it also covers the differences between acids and bases and both the chemical and the physical reactions demonstrated by Invisible Ink Snack Pockets. All this is relevant, perhaps, but confusing to children who have never encountered any of this before. An indentation in stretchy space is a theoretical explanation for the gravity of everything, not just black holes. The recipes have problems, too. The sausage should be precooked before being placed in the Black Hole Swallow-Up Muffins, and the recipe for sugar cookies calls for rolling out the dough without pre-chilling it, making it a recipe for a mess.To be used, with caution, by adult and child together. (Nonfiction. 7-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781570912993
Publisher:
Charlesbridge Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
08/05/2014
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
1,139,539
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.18(d)
Lexile:
830L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Read an Excerpt

Density refers to how tightly packed something is. Think of a milkshake versus a glass of water, or a bowl of thick stew versus a bowl of clear broth. The denser the food, the more it’s going to fill you up.
Feeling a little empty? Wait until you bulk up on some tasty Density Veggie Dressing!

Meet the Author

Ann McCallum is a high school teacher and the author of several children’s books, including Eat Your Math Homework: Recipes for Hungry Minds; Rabbits, Rabbits Everywhere; and Beanstalk: The Measure of a Giant. Ann lives in Kensington, Maryland.

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