Eating Dangerously: Why the Government Can't Keep Your Food Safe ... and How You Can

Overview

Americans are afraid of their food. And for good reason. In 2011, the deadliest food-borne illness outbreak in a century delivered killer listeria bacteria on innocuous cantaloupe never before suspected of carrying that pathogen. Nearly 50 million Americans will get food poisoning this year. Spoiled, doctored or infected food will send more than 100,000 people to the hospital. Three thousand will die. We expect, even assume, our government will protect our food, but how often do you think a major U.S. food farm ...
See more details below
Hardcover
$17.90
BN.com price
(Save 28%)$24.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (18) from $9.31   
  • New (12) from $12.23   
  • Used (6) from $9.31   
Eating Dangerously: Why the Government Can't Keep Your Food Safe ... and How You Can

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.49
BN.com price
(Save 43%)$23.99 List Price

Overview

Americans are afraid of their food. And for good reason. In 2011, the deadliest food-borne illness outbreak in a century delivered killer listeria bacteria on innocuous cantaloupe never before suspected of carrying that pathogen. Nearly 50 million Americans will get food poisoning this year. Spoiled, doctored or infected food will send more than 100,000 people to the hospital. Three thousand will die. We expect, even assume, our government will protect our food, but how often do you think a major U.S. food farm get inspected by federal or state officials? Once a year? Every harvest? Twice a decade? Try never. Eating Dangerously sheds light on the growing problem and introduces readers to the very real, very immediate dangers inherent in our food system.

This two-part guide to our food system's problems and how consumers can help protect themselves is written by two seasoned journalists, who helped break the story of the 2011 listeria outbreak that killed 33 people. Michael Booth and Jennifer Brown, award-winning health and investigative journalists and parents themselves, answer pressing consumer questions about what's in the food supply, what "authorities" are and are not doing to clean it up, and how they can best feed their families without making food their full-time jobs. Both deeply informed and highly readable, Eating Dangerously explains to the American consumer how their food system works—and more importantly how it doesn’t work. It also dishes up course after course of useful, friendly advice gleaned from the cutting-edge laboratories, kitchens and courtrooms where the national food system is taking new shape. Anyone interested in knowing more about how their food makes it from field and farm to store and table will want the inside scoop on just how safe or unsafe that food may be. They will find answers and insight in these pages.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Naheed Ali
Food is a vital element of life that should be taken seriously. This book will serve as an exemplary wake-up call since it enlightens us about the industry where food comes from, and it explains what food really goes through to reach our dinner plates. In essence, the authors skillfully remind the reader that good nutrition should begin with self rather than with government.
William D. Marler
A hard-nosed look at the danger of dining.
Tucker Shaw
The process should be easy: Food is produced, inspected, distributed, sold, eaten. When things go wrong, the culprit should be clear. Right? Not so fast. Booth and Brown shed light on a byzantine food-safety system fraught with imperfect oversight and buck-passing profiteers. But hope rises. Dedicated reformists, life-saving epidemiologists, and careful consumers (you) are working to make it better. Eating Dangerously offers tools for understanding, and avoiding, the perils of modern eating.
Andrew F. Smith
Just when you thought it was safe to eat food again, Eating Dangerously comes along and returns you to reality: Our food system from farm to kitchen is filled with potential safety issues that sicken 48 million and kill 3,000 Americans annually. Health reporter Michael Booth and investigative reporter Jennifer Brown have pulled together the human tragedies and criminal behaviors behind these gross statistics and written a readable exposé on recent foodborne illness outbreaks in America. Just as valuable are the practical tips for buying, storing, and preparing food that, if followed, will reduce your chances of ending up a statistic in the next outbreak.
Naheed Ali M.D.
Food is a vital element of life that should be taken seriously. This book will serve as an exemplary wake-up call since it enlightens us about the industry where food comes from, and it explains what food really goes through to reach our dinner plates. In essence, the authors skillfully remind the reader that good nutrition should begin with self rather than with government.
Michael S. Fenster
As a cardiologist and a chef I work with people around the world about what healthful eating is and how to accomplish it. But far too many people assume healthful ingredients are safe ingredients. Eating Dangerously quite literally brings this difference home. Authors Booth and Brown have compiled an impeccably researched collection of horror stories more troubling than any work of fiction. But they have also given us a guidebook of tips and techniques that allows us to retrieve the sanitary along with our sanity. This is an indispensable companion for anyone who appreciates that the quality of our food must not only be better; it must first be safe.
James Rouse
This is a must read for anyone who cares about their health and their wellness. Not just for themselves but for everyone. This powerful guide will serve to educate and inspire you to be both a catalyst and an activist for food, food safety, and for living your best and most healthy life.
Karl Weber
Americans once assumed that the food on their grocery shelves was wholesome to eat. Sadly, that's no longer a safe assumption. Booth and Brown explain clearly the hidden dangers lurking in the foods we eat, and they offer sound advice about what you can do to protect yourself and your family.
Starred Review Booklist
More than a little Michael Moore–type scary is this eye-opening exposé of foods, grocery shopping, and government oversight in America. Two Denver Post journalists, who investigated the 2011 deadly listeria outbreak (32 killed by eating cantaloupes), use those same skills of inquiry in preparing an account that every U.S. consumer should read. At the beginning, the authors graphically describe many contemporary food crises, from the 1993 Jack in the Box hamburger issues to horse meat found in IKEA meatballs. Nailbiting aside, they take readers through the constraints faced by the FDA and USDA (in numbers alone, 2,800 FDA employees supervise 350,000 food makers); the methodology that the Centers for Disease control and Prevention and epidemiologists use to figure out illness causes; a perspective on food imports (more than 10 million shipments each year arrive at 320 U.S. ports); and penalties levied on the perpetrators. Most important, though, is the diagnostic and prevention section, keeping families safe (and, yes, sane). Through the authors’ eyes, readers will learn how to handle different foods, especially those most prone to bacteria; new, upcoming on-stream technologies that might help stem these outbreaks, from genetically engineered foods to nanotechnology; the five most common gastroenteritis symptoms; and what other manufacturers and agencies are doing to keep us safe. After all, concludes Mile High Organics CEO Michael Joseph, 'It’s really scary to worry your food is going to kill you.'
Food Safety News
This book gets to a 'sweet spot' about food safety that we often dance around. . . Eating Dangerously is a well-sourced book. . . because of all the knowledgeable sources used in putting together this excellent book.
Library Journal
★ 04/15/2014
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that one in six Americans gets sick from food-borne illnesses each year. Of these, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die. Coauthors Booth and Brown, investigative reporters for The Denver Post, explain why these numbers are so high and provide advice that will help readers to avoid contributing to these alarming statistics. The authors begin by describing the scope and magnitude of ailments in the United States in a section that reads like a 60 Minutes exposé: vivid descriptions of people falling ill, a global food market with inconsistent international standards, and inadequate, sometimes nonexistent, government inspections. What follows this account is common-sense advice for consumers. This segment explains how to choose, handle, and prepare food safely and how to identify the riskiest ingredients (as well as reduce their potential harm). Then the authors examine the intersection between food technology and safety, providing an excellent analysis of arguments and evidence for and against genetically modified products; and discuss the relationship between food safety and local and/or organic fare. Also included is an overview of various food-borne illnesses, including information on transmission, symptoms, treatment, and complications. The book concludes with a handy summary of tips for staying protected. VERDICT Both alarming and empowering, this very useful title will help consumers understand and minimize their risk of falling ill.—Janet Crum, Northern Arizona Univ. Lib., Flagstaff
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442222663
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/16/2014
  • Pages: 200
  • Sales rank: 196,705
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Booth is the lead health care writer for The Denver Post and has covered health, medicine, health policy and politics throughout his twenty five-year journalism career. He was part of the team that won the 2013 and 2000 Pulitzer Prizes for Breaking News. He has made frequent appearances on commercial and public television and radio, and has won the National Education Writers’ Award, Best of the West, American Health Care Journalists honors, and other awards. He also co-led the coverage of the most deadly food-borne illness outbreak of the past century, the cantaloupe listeria illnesses of 2011, with Jennifer Brown. Their coverage of the listeria outbreak became the outline for a Congressional committee’s scathing report about what went wrong at the source farm and in the supply chain that sold the tainted melons.

Jennifer Brown is an investigative reporter with The Denver Post and has covered health, medicine and health policy for the past decade. She was part of the team that won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News. Brown led the team covering the two-year debate over national health care reform in 2009 and 2010. She has worked at The Associated Press, The Tyler Morning Telegraph in Texas, and The Hungry Horse News in Montana, and has won a National Headliner Award, three Katie awards and the 2013 Best of the West award for investigative journalism. Brown also has covered the Colorado Legislature, the 2008 Democratic National Convention, and child welfare reform. She co-led the coverage of the most deadly food-borne illness outbreak of the past century, the cantaloupe listeria illnesses of 2011, with Michael Booth.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Part One: Should We Be Afraid of Our Food?
1: Sick: It’s What’s for Dinner. Is Anybody Keeping Our Food Safe?
2: Too Many Cooks, Not Enough Test Tubes: Why a Broken Food-Safety System is Failing to Protect Us
3: Tracing to Safety: The Real-Life “CSI” of an Outbreak
4: The Whole World in Your Kitchen: That Hamburger Came from Five Nations
5: Dirty Dishes: What Happens to the Perpetrators?

Part Two: How to Feed Your Family Safely and Sanely
6: Handle with Care – and Bleach – How to Avoid Illness, from the Shopping Cart to the Compost Heap
7: Killer Sprouts and Slimy Spinach: The Most Dangerous Foods May Surprise You
8: Dances with DNA, and Reconsidering Radiation: Will Mad Science Ruin Food or Save It?
9: So Now You're Sick: How to Tell the Difference Between a “Touch of Food Poisoning” and Deadly Illness
10: Eating Healthy and Eating Safe: No, They Aren’t the Same Thing

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)