Eating My Words: An Appetite for Life

( 3 )

Overview

As one of the country's foremost restaurant reviewers, Mimi Sheraton set the standard for food writing and criticism. In this engrossing memoir, the doyenne of food criticism explains how she developed her passion for writing about food and wine, sharing the secrets of her career, including her years at the New York Times. Witty and honest, she talks openly about the importance of anonymity, her battle with weight, and the demands of juggling work with the needs of a husband and son. From fine dining to lunch in ...

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Overview

As one of the country's foremost restaurant reviewers, Mimi Sheraton set the standard for food writing and criticism. In this engrossing memoir, the doyenne of food criticism explains how she developed her passion for writing about food and wine, sharing the secrets of her career, including her years at the New York Times. Witty and honest, she talks openly about the importance of anonymity, her battle with weight, and the demands of juggling work with the needs of a husband and son. From fine dining to lunch in New York City public schools, Mimi Sheraton gives readers the big dish on a life in food.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060501105
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 555,102
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Meet the Author

Mimi Sheraton is a veteran food critic for the New York Times, Time, Vanity Fair, Food & Wine, and Condé Nast Traveler. She lives in New York City.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xi
Introduction-Fed Up 1
The Making of a Critic
Like Mother, Like Daughter 11
A Taste of New York 27
Nibbling Around the Edges 39
A Table Before Me 55
Achieving Critical Mass
My Time at the Times 87
Don't Call Me Mimi 104
Operation Otto 128
What Makes a Restaurant Tick? 138
The Care and Feeding of Passengers, Patients and Other Captives 158
Matters of Taste
I Eat Hot! 181
We Eat What We Are 199
Season to Taste 210
Eating My Words 224
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 30, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    For foodies

    If you're interested in the world of restaurants and food this is a good book. A funny and insightful look into the world of fine cuisine and world travel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2004

    Sharp, Short and Witty

    By Bill Marsano. Years ago, in the slim hope of making myself useful on a certain magazine, I often volunteered to edit Mimi Sheraton's column. She was counted a tough cookie by the other editors, who preferred saps. My stock did in fact rise through self-sacrifice, and so did my free time, for the fact was her column was a breeze. Of course, if an editor mucked around with her copy (and that, I can say without exposing any trade secrets, is what editors generally do), then it wasn't a breeze. So after reading her tight-knit prose, her well-reasoned judgments, her lucid thoughts, I'd call her about a couple of minor points and we'd agree on changing or not in about ten minutes. Then, with my door shut and no one in any case daring to approach Sheraton Control, I had the afternoon free. (Later, when other editors asked how it had gone, I just rolled my eyes.) Keys to Sheraton's style were sticking to the subject and not showing off. Her judgments were measured, not designed to become sound bites; the meal was the star, not the reviewer. Here she does write about (among many other things) herself, and what an interesting self she turns out to be. She covers a lot of ground, including childhood before the war (i.e., World War II); college-girl adventures in New York City (especially funny: her story of breaking up with a civilian boyfriend while being attached to two other guys in the armed services); early work in home-furnishings journalism; plunging into food writing through a passion for travel; her ups and downs as a nationally known food critic for the New York Times (and other publications) and her attempts at improving what professionals call 'volume feedings and mass management' and the rest of us call jail, airline, school and hospital food. Sheraton has a fine line in dry wit and is always informative: Most readers will learn some surprising things about restaurants and reviewing. She lists the 20 most-asked quiestion and answers every one, and provides a good idea of the pressures applied to a critic by big-name restaurateurs--and by people who think they're critics just because they run a newspaper. (Odd--but I don't think the Times has reviewed her book. Odd.) But she isn't dishy. Anyone looking here for gossip, innuendo and the settling of scores has come to the wrong place. Sheraton conquers but she does not stoop. And she does it all in 240 pages. One reason is that she writes tightly and tartly. (At least one other well-known 'foodie' has published two books, totaling nearly 600 pages, and isn't finished yet.) Another is that she speaks often of wonderful dishes but gives no recipes. Good for her. Recipes are turning up in lots of places they don't really belong these days, including mysteries and popular novels. I usually suspect that means the author hasn't really got the goods, and knows it, and hopes I won't notice. (For much the same reason I resist nutritional puns traditional in this sort of review. I refuse to call this a 'bubbling bouillaisse of a book.') The only time she comes close to such nonsense is with her brisk instructions (maybe a dozen words?) for how to make a Jewish chicken--or a chicken Jewish. Sheraton's 240 pages go rattling by--there's no padding--and because even now I read as an editor, I ticked a few things: I disagree with her use of 'ascribe' and 'masterful,' and former New York City Mayor John Lindsay would, if he could, on personal orthography. Once where she says Michelin I'm almost certain she means Gault-Millau, but that's about it. (Come to think of it, where was the copy editor?) In all, the experience was like those long-gone magazine days: great reading and effortless, too.--Bill Marsano is a professional writer and editor.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2004

    Funny, dishy, earthy, salty.

    'Eating My Words' is a good read and great insight into the making of a critic, as well as the soup to nuts of actually being a critic. Some surprising detours include the cafeterias of New York City's public schools and a trip to a sex toy emporium in Japan.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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