Eating Well for Optimum Health: The Essential Guide to Food, Diet, and Nutrition

Overview

At last, a book about eating (and eating well) for health—from Dr. Andrew Weil, the brilliantly innovative and greatly respected doctor who has been instrumental in transforming the way Americans think about health.

Now Dr. Weil—whose nationwide best-sellers Spontaneous Healing and Eight Weeks to Optimum Health have made us aware of the body's capacity to heal itself—provides us with a program for improving our well-being by making informed ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (4) from $17.56   
  • New (1) from $36.00   
  • Used (3) from $17.56   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$36.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(323)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Eating Well for Optimum Health: The Essential Guide to Food, Diet, and Nutrition

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - File Size 357KB)
$11.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

At last, a book about eating (and eating well) for health—from Dr. Andrew Weil, the brilliantly innovative and greatly respected doctor who has been instrumental in transforming the way Americans think about health.

Now Dr. Weil—whose nationwide best-sellers Spontaneous Healing and Eight Weeks to Optimum Health have made us aware of the body's capacity to heal itself—provides us with a program for improving our well-being by making informed choices about how and what we eat.

He gives us all the basic facts about human nutrition. Here is everything we need to know about fats, protein, carbohydrates, minerals, and vitamins, and their effects on our health.

He equips us to make decisions about the latest miracle diet or reducing aid.

At the heart of his book, he presents in easy-to-follow detail his recommended OPTIMUM DIET, including complete weekly menus for use both at home and in restaurants.

He provides eighty-five recipes accompanied by a rigorous and reliable nutritional breakdown—delicious recipes reminding us that we can eat for health without giving up the essential pleasures of eating.

Customized dietary advice is included for dozens of common ailments, among them asthma, allergies, heart disease, migraines, and thyroid problems. Dr. Weil helps us to read labels on all food products and thereby become much wiser consumers. Throughout he makes clear how an optimal diet can both supply the basic needs of the body and fortify the body's defenses and mechanisms of healing. And he always stresses that good food—and the good feeling it engenders at the table—is not only a delight but also necessary to our well-being, so that eating for health means enjoyable eating.

In sum, a hugely practical and inspiring book about food, diet, and nutrition that stands to change—for the better and the healthier—our most fundamental ideas about eating.

About the Author:
Andrew Weil, M.D., a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School, is Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona and director of the Program in Integrative Medicine at that institution. He is also the founder of the Foundation for Integrative Medicine in Tucson, Arizona, and editorial director of the "Ask Dr. Weil" Web site (www.drweil.com). Dr. Weil is the author of eight books, including most recently Spontaneous Healing and Eight Weeks to Optimum Health.

Eating Well for Optimum Health is a hugely practical and inspiring book about food, diet and nutrition that stands to change — for the better and the healthier — our most fundamental ideas about eating.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Andrew Weil, M.D., is well known for his nationally bestselling books on the body's ability to heal itself, Spontaneous Healing and 8 Weeks to Optimum Health. Now Dr. Weil turns his attention toward improving health and well-being through diet. But Eating Well for Optimum Health: The Essential Guide to Food, Diet, and Nutrition is more than just a diet book. In addition to containing enough information to be a fairly extensive primer on nutrition, Eating Well for Optimum Health also looks at and evaluates other diet plans, including those enjoying current popularity.

The results are not what you might expect. Rather than dismissing these diets out of hand, Weil highlights the advantages as well as the shortcomings. He clearly and concisely discusses the principles of nutrition at work with each diet, then sifts out the positive attributes they all share, using them as the basis for making his own dietary recommendations. This logical and methodical process makes Weil a diet guru in the strictest sense of the word, providing enlightenment and guidance to help readers negotiate their way through the confusing maze of diets currently on the market.

Weil doesn't focus only on making eating a healthy habit; he also addresses making it a pleasurable one. He stresses and addresses the importance of satisfying hunger pangs, of course, but he also pays attention to the importance of satisfying the other pleasures often derived from eating, such as tactile sensations and emotional connections. The bulk of the book, however, is dedicated to the study of nutrition, providing a detailed discussion of fats, carbohydrates, protein, vitamins, and minerals.

Weil points out that a large part of the confusion created by the wide array of dietary advice available today is that each camp can spout medical and scientific studies that support their particular plan. Weil shows us why -- it's because each of these diets has attributes grounded in science. He shows how a low-fat diet offers certain distinct advantages but can also create problems because it may not fulfill the body's need for all nutrients. With regard to carbohydrates, Weil examines the evidence that suggests a high carbohydrate intake may contribute to obesity and heart disease and agrees there is a connection. But Weil theorizes that the problem is not so much that we are consuming larger quantities of carbohydrates as such -- rather, the trouble is that we now tend to consume poorer-quality carbohydrates. He examines the glycemic index value of carbohydrates in great detail, explaining how these values affect nutrition and metabolism and why foods with a low glycemic index are preferable to those with a high one -- and he provides a table that lists the glycemic index value of many popular foods. The results are a little surprising when you realize that rice cakes, which are traditionally considered a "diet" food, have a high glycemic index that can actually interfere with dieting.

After a thorough examination of the various nutritional components and the soundness of other diets, Weil spends a few pages composing what he calls "the worst diet in the world." He then invites readers to visit three different fast food restaurants and observe the people eating there, with this worst diet in mind. Considering Weil's claim that fast food is the "most unhealthy dietary development in human history," it's clear what he expects readers to find. He then provides his "best diet in the world," incorporating basic nutritional guidelines and the advantages offered by several other diets. His "best diet" is presented in weekly menu plans that are backed up by a collection of 85 recipes that include everything from soups and salads to desserts. The recipes vary with regard to time and complexity, and at the end of each one, there is a complete nutritional analysis.

Weil also devotes a chapter to the dissection and evaluation of consumer labeling, using several ordinary items off the grocery store shelves to demonstrate how such labeling can be both beneficial and misleading. For those who eat out often, there is a discussion on how to make sensible choices in a restaurant. At the back of the book are appendixes chock-full of helpful information, like a breakdown of daily nutritional needs in an optimal diet, a list of other helpful resources, and a Q&A section that addresses a number of common dietary problems. But probably the most helpful of the appendixes is the one that provides dietary recommendations for a number of common health concerns, everything from allergies and arthritis to body odor and prostate problems.

Weil's stated goal for this book is to turn readers into savvy consumers who can make wise and informed dietary choices that will promote good health. He has achieved that goal in spades, developing a sensible plan that can be customized to meet the needs of just about any dietary situation.

Beth Amos, RN, spent 20 years working as a nurse in various medical settings before becoming a novelist and medical freelance writer. She has authored more than 100 articles in medical and lay journals around the country.

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Now considered one of holistic medicine's most authoritative voices, Weil (Spontaneous Healing; 8 Weeks to Optimum Health) provides a common-sense approach to healthy eating. While much of this information can be found in other volumes, Weil illuminates the often confusing and conflicting ideas circulating about good nutrition, addressing specific health issues and offering nutritional guidance to help heal and prevent major illnesses. Of particular value is his examination of recent fads, such as low-carbohydrate, vegan and "Asian" diets, with an eye toward debunking the myths about them while highlighting their valuable aspects. Readers will appreciate the brief stories of individuals who have made big changes in their eating habits and solved chronic health problems, as well as recipes for foods that Weil feels will satisfy nutritional needs and the taste buds. Although not the first to link the rise of cancer, heart disease and obesity with the now-prevalent consumption of fast food and processed foods that contain a lot of sugar and few, if any, micronutrients, Weil's articulate plea to reflect on the consequences is convincing. Despite Weil's emphasis on a diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, unprocessed foods and much less meat and dairy products than most Americans are used to, readers will notice a profoundly realistic observation of what changes they can readily incorporate into their busy lives. And they will be heartened to learn that they can eat nutritious foods and still get much pleasure from them. (Mar.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Library Journal
In this tape, Weil delivers detailed information concerning the various macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) and micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, etc.) that, he believes, promote maximum health and longevity. He is critical of nutrition plans that stress an overabundance, or an almost complete avoidance, of any nutritional components. As usual, Weil (Spontaneous Healing) is careful to explain the reasons for his recommendations. He offers clear instructions on how to read food packaging to rate the nutritional claims made by the manufacturers. His explanations of how to take vitamins and minerals in order to obtain maximum benefits are particularly well done. Further, the author proves to be an excellent reader, helping to make a potentially overwhelming topic understandable. In effect, this cassette offers a good basic text on nutrition and how the body uses food to maintain health. Listeners who need reputable information concerning nutrition will find this tape invaluable. However, many users will have to take notes or refer to the book to obtain maximum benefit--there is a lot of data in this book that will, pardon the pun, need to be digested. Highly recommended for public, academic, and consumer health collections.--Kathleen Sullivan, Phoenix P.L. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375409639
  • Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/7/2000
  • Format: Cassette
  • Edition description: Unabridged, 6 cassettes, 10 hrs.
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.10 (h) x 2.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Weil, M.D., a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School, is Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona and director of the Program in Integrative Medicine at that institution. He is also the founder of the Foundation for Integrative Medicine in Tucson, Arizona, and editorial director of the "Ask Dr. Weil" Web site (drweil.com). Dr. Weil is the author of eight books, including most recently Spontaneous Healing and Eight Weeks to Optimum Health.

Biography

Since the early ‘70s, Andrew Weil has been bucking conventional wisdom about healthy living.

Weil began his career with a bang -- or maybe just a puff -- in The Natural Mind, a book containing ideas that remain controversial today. Most famously, it endorsed the idea of "stoned thinking" (induced not only by drugs but also by hypnosis, meditation, etc.) and identified a bias in traditional studies about mind-altering drugs. The book was fortified by Weil's own experience studying and taking various psychotropic agents, and while it suggested that non-chemical experiences were healthier, it also bore open criticism of American drug policy. Weil continued his exploration of altered mental states with The Marriage of the Sun and Moon and From Chocolate to Morphine (coauthored with Winifred Rosen).

In his next three titles -- Health and Healing, Natural Health, Natural Medicine, and Spontaneous Healing -- Weil turned to illness and alternative therapies, educating readers on then relatively unknown options such as homeopathy, herbal medicine, cranial therapy and other unconventional approaches. The fact that Weil was a Harvard-trained doctor lent his writings credibility and popularity with an ever-widening readership, even as he earned a somewhat heretical status in the world of mainstream medicine.

Some of Weil's views might rile practitioners of traditional medicine -- he has suggested that certain conventional treatments do more harm than good -- but Weil has never advocated abandonment of the medical establishment. Rather, he promotes integrative medicine: an approach to health that embraces nontraditional healing methods and takes the mind and spirit into account when assessing and treating problems. In response to Dr. Arthur Relman's assault in the New Republic, charging that assertions in Weil's books that lacked scientific backing, Weil responded on his web site, "If I had dismissed the successes I saw with [cranial therapy, for example] as ‘anecdotes,' we would not be in a position to take the next step and gather the data that Dr. Relman wants to see. It is important to note that paradigm shifts, in medicine as in other fields, are not quiet affairs. They occasion much screaming and kicking." (To both of the doctors' credits, they engaged in a public debate at the University of Arizona following Relman's much-discussed critique, minus the screaming and kicking.) Whatever the future holds for certain alternative approaches, it is a testament both to Weil's popularity and the growing interest in his ideas that studies of such practices have begun to win funding and attention.

Eight Weeks to Optimum Health was the most complete synthesis yet of Weil's ideas about holistic health and also helped cement his status as a health guru. Unlike most "diets" that focused mostly on meal plans and magical eating formulas, Weil's program is about a balance of nutrients, herbs, exercise, and mental salves such as turning off the news or keeping fresh flowers around. In particular, Weil became a well known expert on the growing field of herbal supplements.

Recently, Weil teamed with Rosie Daley -- Oprah's former personal chef – to create The Healthy Kitchen. The book operates on a bit of push-and-pull between Daley and Weil, with "Andy" offering substitute ingredients to some of Rosie's recipes. As with Weil's other tomes, The Healthy Kitchen does not operate on draconian edicts, offering options for individuals instead.

Good To Know

Weil is director and founder of the Program in Integrative Medicine of the College of Medicine, University of Arizona. Also, his Polaris Foundation advances the cause of integrative medicine through public policy, education, and research.

Weil's parents owned a millinery store in Philadelphia, and his mother fostered his interest in botany. "When you grow up in a row house, there's very limited opportunity to grow stuff, but my mother knew some things from her mother, who was the one with the real green thumb," he told My Generation magazine. "And she did introduce me to growing bulbs in the house, and we had a little plot of ground to garden. That stuff fascinated me. And I always dreamed about the day when I could have enough space to do it."

Weil's undergraduate focus was ethnobotany, which focuses on the uses of certain plants by various cultures and ethnicities. His thesis title: "The Use of Nutmeg as a Psychotropic Agent." Under a fellowship from the Institute of Current World Affairs, Weil traveled from 1971-75 throughout Central and South America to investigate cultural psychotropics and healing. Many of his findings from this time are collected in The Marriage of the Sun and Moon.

Weil lives in Arizona "by pure chance," he told HealthWorld Online. His car broke down in the mid-1970s, and it took so long to fix that he ended up staying in Tucson.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Tucson, Arizona
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 8, 1942
    2. Place of Birth:
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    1. Education:
      B.A. in Biology, Harvard University, 1964; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1968
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER ONE
The Principles of Eating Well

When I use the words eating well, I mean using food not only to influence health and well-being but to satisfy the senses, providing pleasure and comfort. In addition to supplying the basic needs of the body for calories and nutrients, an optimum diet should also reduce risks of disease and fortify the body's defenses and intrinsic mechanisms of healing. I believe that how we eat is an important determinant of how we feel and how we age. I also believe that food can function as medicine to influence a variety of common ailments.

The American Council on Science and Health, a New York-based nonprofit organization dedicated to "helping distinguish between real and hypothetical health risks," recently suggested ten resolutions for a healthy new year. The council included obvious ones, such as don't smoke, wear seat belts, and install smoke detectors, but addressed diet in only one paragraph:
Eat a balanced and varied diet. Avoid obesity and fad diets. There are no magical guidelines for good nutrition. Patients should resolve to plan their diet around the watchwords "variety, moderation, and balance." Remember: There are no "good" or "bad" foods. The primary danger from food is overindulgence.

I find this advice to be remarkably unhelpful. Eat a balanced diet What is that? I meet people who think that adding a salad with creamy dressing to a cheeseburger and French fries balances the meal. Avoid obesity? Sure, that sounds like a good idea, but how do you do it? There are no "good" or "bad" foods? What about soybeans? They contain healthy fiber, a fat that may help lower cholesterol, and unusual compounds called isoflavones that may offer significant protection against common forms of cancer. Soybeans seem like a good food to me. What about margarine? For years I've been telling my patients to avoid it because it contains trans-fatty acids (TFAs), unnatural fats that promote inflammation, heart disease, and cancer. Sounds like a bad food to me -- I won't eat it, even in moderation or in the pursuit of variety.

The primary danger from food is overindulgence? I'm sure my distant ancestors had no problem in that area, but what am I supposed to do when everywhere I look I see tempting offerings of food in ever more novel preparations, when many restaurants score points for the size of portions they serve, when I get more for my money buying giant sizes of food and drink, and when people who love me or want my attention give me food and more food as expressions of their affection or interest?

The poor advice about diet and health that people get far too often when they ask physicians, nurses, registered dietitians, and other representatives of the health-care establishment for help reflects the dearth of good nutritional education in our professional schools. If you look to other sources -- alternative practitioners, bookstores, health food stores, the Internet, for example -- there is no shortage of information about nutritional influences on health. In fact, there is much too much of it out there, most of it contradictory, unscientific, and intended to promote particular foods, diets, or dietary supplements.

While scanning nutrition-related sites on the Internet, for example, I came across glowing recommendations for products made from "super blue-green algae," microorganisms from a lake in Oregon. I was told that:
Super Blue Green Algae gives us nutrients and energy at almost no cost to the body's reserves. This algae is 97% assimilable, and many of the nutrients are in forms that are directly usable. For example, the algae's 60% protein content is of a type called glycoproteins, as opposed to the lipoproteins found in vegetables and meat. As a result, the body doesn't have to spend its valuable resources converting lipoproteins into glycoproteins as it does with other foods. Super Blue Green Algae contains almost every vitamin and mineral needed by the body . . . [and] is one of the richest sources of chlorophyll -- a cell regenerator and blood purifier.

Should I rush to order this costly "superfood"? Can it be that all my life my body has been wasting its valuable resources converting lipoproteins to glycoproteins when it could have been getting just what it wanted from pond scum? As for chlorophyll, while it performs a vital function in the life of green plants, it has no role that I know of in human nutrition.

At one extreme are authorities telling us that we are what we eat, that health, good and bad, is entirely or mostly a creation of what we put in our mouths. There is a kernel of attractive logic in that formulation that resonates with common sense. We have to eat to live, because food is fuel for the metabolic engine. The quality of fuel you burn must influence your body, just as the grade of fuel you put into an internal combustion engine influences its performance for better or worse, not only in the short run -- a smooth purr versus a ragged knock, for example -- but also in the long run, retarding or accelerating the accumulation of deposits that reduce the longevity of valves, rings, and ultimately the entire engine. But it is a long way from this simple observation to the conclusion that diet is everything.

At the other extreme are voices telling us it doesn't matter. "Eat healthy, exercise, die anyway." "Just eat a balanced diet." "My uncle Jake ate big helpings of bacon, eggs, steak, and butter every day of his life and lived to be ninety-nine." "There are no good and bad foods." "People who say you can affect your health and treat disease by changing your diet are food faddists." "It's all in your genes, anyway."


I know of no subject more confused, emotionally charged, and important in our lives than food and nutrition and their influence on our well-being. When I give public talks on health and medicine, the questions I get reveal both the interest and confusion. Here are some examples:


  • How can I lose weight? I've tried everything.
  • It seems as if I gain weight just by looking at food. Why?
  • I've had cancer. What foods should I avoid?
  • I have no energy. Could my diet be the problem?
  • I thought we were supposed to avoid dietary fat. Now I'm hearing that fat is okay and carbohydrates are bad. What are the answers?
  • Is it okay to eat soybeans if I had breast cancer?
  • If I change my diet, can I get off all the drugs I'm taking for my arthritis?
  • My five-year-old has asthma. Are there foods he shouldn't be eating? My doctor doesn't seem to know.
  • A holistic doctor told me I'm allergic to wheat. What does that mean? I love bread and pasta.
  • If I'm eating pretty well, do I need to take vitamins?
  • If I'm supposed to be eating more fruits and vegetables, do I have to worry about pesticides on them?
  • I don't have time to cook. How can I eat a healthy diet?
  • My children like only macaroni and cheese. How can I get them to develop better eating habits?
  • I love chocolate. Is it bad for me?
  • The cafeteria food at my school is wretched. How can I persuade the school to improve it?
  • Is it all right to eat eggs if heart disease runs in your family?
  • Is sugar bad for you?
  • Are microwave ovens safe?
  • Is it dangerous to cook in aluminum pots?
  • I read that dairy products could be causing my sinus problems. Isn't milk supposed to be the perfect food?
  • Are artificial sweeteners safe?
  • Is it okay to drink water with your meals?
  • What's the best way to eat if I want to live to be a hundred?

I could extend this list to fill dozens and dozens of pages. It shows the keen interest people have in this subject, their inability to get answers, and their concern about opinions that are contradictory and confusing. People sense the possibility of improving health by making informed choices regarding food, and they sense danger in making uninformed ones, but they do not know where to get information they can trust.

Physicians are at almost the same disadvantage as the rest of us. My medical partner, Dr. Brian Becker, tells me that he was completely turned off the subject of nutrition at the age of ten, when he was forced to listen to a dietitian talk to his fifth-grade class about healthy eating and the four basic food groups then in fashion. "She was overweight, slovenly, smoked at the break, and was in no way anyone I wanted to identify with," he recalls. "Furthermore, the information she gave us was later proved wrong. That one experience stayed with me for years and has made it impossible for me to read or hear anything about nutrition without feeling bored and resentful."

My purpose in writing this book is to explore the issues and controversies surrounding food and nutrition in order to bring clarity to the subject and establish for readers a sense of what eating well means. First I want to state seven basic propositions that underlie my philosophy of food and nutrition and how they both influence health.

We Have to Eat to Live.


The body requires energy for all of its functions, from the beating of the heart and the elimination of wastes to the transmission of electrical and chemical signals in the nervous system. It gets its energy from food, by taking it in, digesting it, and metabolizing its components. Food is fuel that contains energy from the sun, originally captured and stored by green plants, then passed along to fruits, seeds, and animals. Humans eat these foods, and burn the fuel they contain -- that is, combine it with oxygen in a controlled fashion to release and capture the stored solar energy. As long as we live, we have to eat and eat often.

Or do we? Throughout history there have been unsubstantiated reports of persons who survive without eating. Their ability to do so is usually ascribed to sainthood or to mastery of esoteric mental powers. I can understand that some people are fascinated by the possibility of surviving without eating because of a philosophical quandary: the fact that we live at the expense of other life. Whether we destroy carrots or cows, it is a fact that we are unable to survive and grow without ending the existence of other life-forms; "nature red in tooth and claw" includes us. (Green plants, of course, are not burdened with this requirement: They eat light, binding the energy of photons from the sun into chemical bonds that forge carbon dioxide and water into glucose, the simple sugar that is the most basic foodstuff. They can later burn this glucose as fuel or convert it into starch or fat for storage.)

In my case and for most of us the reality is that we must eat to live, usually several times a day. Not having enough food is seen as an ultimate misfortune and a cause of human suffering, and having it in abundance is cause for rejoicing.


Eating is a Major Source of Pleasure.


In societies where food is scarce, it is seen primarily as a necessity of life and little thought is given to it beyond that. In societies where food is abundant, people use it for purposes far beyond mere survival. In our society, a great deal of time, energy, and money goes into the preparation and consumption of food that is intended to provide pleasure. Gastronomic pleasure is complex, however. We respond not only to the odors, tastes, and textures of food but to its associations. Think of the comfort foods you would turn to if you were sick, hurt, or sad. Would you choose a baked potato? buttered toast? a steak? ice cream? Do you associate comfort with foods that a caring parent brought you when you were sick in childhood: chicken soup or rice pudding, for example? The appearance and smell of such food combines with its taste and feel in the mouth to create a pleasurable experience that also includes satisfaction at being nourished.

I respond positively to food prepared with care and attention and negatively to food that is careless and artless. When I am traveling and go into a strange restaurant, I can often tell at once whether food will be good by the feel of the place. I have found wonderful food in simple, inexpensive establishments and disappointing food in many expensive ones. The simplest meals can be extraordinarily satisfying if they are prepared and served with care and with the intention to provide pleasure as well as sustenance. And I have observed that when truly wonderful food is served to a group of diners, conversation virtually stops, and people concentrate almost entirely on the pleasure of eating.

Psychologists describe food as a primary reinforcer -- that is, something with intrinsic power to shape behavior. Give an animal food when it exhibits a certain behavior, and it will behave that way more frequently. Food is an especially powerful reinforcer, used by trainers to elicit performances of animals in circuses and movies in apparent contrast to their wild natures. In order for food to exert this effect, it must be presented to an animal that is hungry. In other words, a state of relative deprivation of the reinforcing stimulus must exist for it to exert its power over behavior. If an animal is sated it is in a refractory state, not responsive to the reinforcing stimulus of food.

Everyone knows the equivalent human state, when deprivation makes food so appealing that we would do almost anything to get it. A quirk of the human condition is that the imagined pleasure of consuming food that is not there often exceeds the actual pleasure of consuming food that is.

Pleasure we experience in our minds must also be in our brains. Neuroscientists have identified a number of systems in the brain that correlate with pleasurable experience, focusing especially on the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and noradrenalin. Disturbances in these systems may be associated with addiction, risk-seeking behavior, and the calamitous symptom of anhedonia, the inability to experience pleasure that often accompanies severe depression. The identification of imbalances in neurotransmitters and their receptors on neurons opened the way to inventions of new psychopharmaceutical drugs that are now widely prescribed to correct the imbalances with variable clinical success.

It may well be that all addictive behavior has common correlates in neuroreceptor physiology and that we will one day understand this physiology well enough to treat addiction effectively by means of drugs. What is certain, however, is that addictive behavior can form around all pleasurable experiences, eating among them. People who develop addictive patterns of eating are often trying to reduce anxiety, alleviate depression, anesthetize themselves, or otherwise manipulate their psychophysical states, because food and eating modify neurochemistry, including that of brain centers regulating pleasure, arousal, and mood. Looking at addictive eating in this way makes it appear more understandable yet more complex than simple craving or failure of willpower.

Most of us know people who eat immoderately, although many food addicts may conceal their behavior and indulge themselves in private. Here is a snapshot of one prodigious eater, the writer A. J. Liebling, provided by his fellow writer and friend Brendan Gill in his memoir Here at The New Yorker:
It is said to be a weakness in my character not to be much interested in food, and Liebling was a true trencherman, whose appetite astonished and appalled me. I saw that he was, in the old saying, digging his grave with his teeth, but there was nothing to be done about it; the pleasure he took in gourmandizing was obviously identical to the pleasure other people took in listening to a Chopin nocturne. One day at lunch at the Villa Nova, during a period when, on doctor's orders, Liebling was making a valiant effort to eat lightly, he ordered a succulent dish of veal, peppers, and eggplant, which, in the Villa Nova tradition, arrived at the table aswim and asizzle in a large pewter platter. Liebling quickly polished off the entire platter, then, breaking chunks of bread from a long loaf on the table, soaked up the remaining gravy, all but literally licking the platter clean. It was a meal the very thought of which was enough to keep me from feeling hungry for a week. Liebling beckoned to the waiter. I thought he would be asking for the check, but not at all. "I'll have one more of the same," he said.

Obviously, not all of us respond to food in the same way. Although it acts as a primary reinforcer for everyone who is hungry, individuals derive various degrees of pleasure from it. For some, eating is mostly a necessity of life; attention paid to the sensual aspect of food is minimal, and pleasure is sought elsewhere -- in listening to music or in sex, for example. Nonetheless, I think it is fair to say that food is an important source of pleasure for most of us, and a primary source of it for some of us. For that reason, any recommendations for healthy eating that diminish or eliminate the pleasure of the experience of eating are certain to fail.



Food That Is Healthy and Food That Gives Pleasure Are Not Mutually Exclusive.


A common lament I hear from patients is, "Everything I like to eat is bad for me." This is often paired with a question: "If it's bad for you, why does it taste so good?" Actually, as I will soon explain, there are perfectly good reasons why our senses guide us to foods high in fat and sugar, to large portions of meat, to fast food, and to what even those who love it characterize as "junk food." The fault is not with our taste but in the way we have changed the environment to make once scarce foods readily available.

A more puzzling question is, "Why is healthy food so dull?" I have my own answer to that one, which is that many people who preach the virtues of healthy eating do not really like food, or, more precisely, are not the people who are neurochemically programmed to derive significant pleasure from the experience of eating. Many writers of diet books are in this category as are many nutritionists, dietitians, and health professionals who tell others how they should eat. They are not lovers of good food.

Consider this recipe for Sun Garden Burgers from a book of "simple recipes for living well":
Combine carrot pulp [leftover residue after juicing carrots], ground flax and sunflower seeds, finely minced celery, onion, parsley, and red pepper; season with soy sauce; shape into patties and leave them in the sun until warm or place in warm oven for 15 minutes. These are delicious served in a cabbage leaf "bun": fold a cabbage leaf over the burger with any condiments you like or cut two squares of cabbage from the large leaves and place the burger in between them.


I rest my case.

Years ago, when I was first experimenting with vegetarian cooking, I had an English couple as houseguests. I served them a meal of whole grains and, I thought, artfully prepared vegetables. They ate it with curiosity and mild enthusiasm, but when one of them came to breakfast the next morning, he said with a wry face and one hand on his stomach, "Health food really gives you gas, doesn't it?"

If your main experience of healthy food is that it gives you gas, you are not likely to come back for more. Or, if you do, you must be one of those who find virtue in suffering, convinced that health and pleasure do not come together at the table.

My job is to convince you otherwise.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 - First Course
1. We Have to Eat to Live
2. Eating Is a Major Source of Pleasure
3. Food That Is Healthy and Food that Gives Pleasure Are Not Mutually Exclusive
4. Eating Is a Most Important Focus of Social Interaction
5. How We Eat Reflects and Defines Our Personal and Cultural Identity
6. How We Eat Is One Determinant of Health
7. Changing How We Eat Is One Strategy for Managing Disease and Restoring Health
Chapter 2 - The Macronutrients 1. Carbohydrates 2. Fats 3. Proteins
Chapter 3 - Carbohydrates Revisited: Staff of Life or Contributor to Illness
Chapter 4 - Fats Revisited
Chapter 5 - Proteins Revisited
Chapter 6 - The Optimum Diet
Chapter 7 - Food Preparation and Ingredients
Chapter 8 - Nutritional Medicine: Tailoring Diet to Medical Conditions
Chapter 9 - Recipes
Chapter 10 - Sources
Read More Show Less

Recipe

Mediterranean Tuna Steaks



2 ahi tuna steaks, 4-6 ounces each, about 1 inch thick
2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
salt and pepper to taste
1 medium ripe tomato, diced fine
6 green olives, pitted and chopped
1 tablespoon scallions, chopped
2 teaspoons capers
1 clove garlic, mashed
a pinch of dried whole oregano

1. Rinse the tuna steaks under cold running water and pat dry. Brush them with 1 teaspoon of the olive oil and season them with salt and pepper.
2. Preheat grill or broiler. Meanwhile, mix all the remaining ingredients, season with salt and pepper, and set aside.
3. Grill the steaks on high heat or broil, about 2-3 minutes per side or until desired doneness.
4. Cover the steaks with topping mixture, and serve. Good hot or cold.

Servings: 2. Calories 161, fat 7 g (40% of calories from fat), saturated fat 1 g, protein 20.5 g, carbohydrate 3 g, cholesterol 38 mg, fiber 1 g

Nutritional benefits: Protein from fish




Pasta Puttanesca


5-6 cups fresh tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and crushed (or use canned Italian tomatoes, drained and crushed)
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon dried hot red pepper flakes
1 1/2 tablespoons capers, drained and rinsed
3 tablespoons black olives (Kalamata or oil-cured), pitted and chopped
1 tablespoon garlic, minced
2 tablespoons fresh basil leaves, minced
1 pound dried penne pasta
3/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated

1. In a large bowl, combine the tomatoes, olive oil, red pepper flakes, capers, olives, garlic, and basil. Let stand at room temperature for 1 hour.
2. Cook the pasta until it is al dente. Drain well.
3. Toss the hot pasta with the tomato mixture. Add the grated Parmesan cheese and serve immediately.

Servings: 6. Calories 391, fat 7.5 g (17% of calories from fat), saturated fat 2.5 g, protein 15.5 g, carbohydrate 66 g, cholesterol 8 mg, sodium 247 mg, fiber 4 g

Nutritional benefits: Good carbohydrate; micronutrients from tomatoes and garlic




Apple Crisp


12 large green apples, peeled, cored, and sliced
juice of 1 fresh lemon
1z4 cup raisins
1/3 cup brandy
1/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons whole-wheat pastry flour
1 1/2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
1/2 cup toasted wheat germ
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
1/3 cup light olive oil
1/3 cup maple syrup
nonstick cooking spray

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
2. In a mixing bowl, toss the apples with the lemon juice, raisins, brandy, brown sugar, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, and the flour.
3. Pile the apples in a glass or ceramic baking dish sprayed with nonstick cooking spray.
4. Mix together the remaining ingredients and cover the apples with the mixture.
5. Cover the baking dish with aluminum foil and bake 20 minutes. Uncover and bake 30-40 minutes more until the apples are soft. Serve warm.

Servings: 12. Calories 244, fat 7.5 g (27.5% of calories from fat), saturated fat 1 g, protein 4 g, carbohydrate 40 g, cholesterol 0 mg, sodium 140 mg, fiber 5 g

Nutritional benefits: Fiber and carbohydrate from whole grains; monounsaturated fat; micronutrients

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2001

    Read This Book After Live Right for Your Type

    I have found Live Right for Your Type to be the best single book I have read about healthy eating, but I could appreciate that book as much as I did because of what I learned from reading Eating Well for Optimum Health. I recommend that you read both books, with this one being the second in order. If you are tired of trying to make sense out of all of the conflicting claims about foods, diets, and various diseases, this book is your answer. The author bravely takes on any school of thought about food (including unhealthy ones), and provides a balanced perspective on what is wrong with that approach. Health is not only about eating. It is also about exercise, sleep, relationships with others, genetics, and environment. But for the part of health that relates to food, this book is the overall be-all and end-all for now. I say that not because of any weakness the book has, but simply because scientific information about health is expanding so rapidly. As Dr. Weil points out, the information he shares in this book is often news to medical students and physicians. Food and health are subjects that are poorly connected in our minds at this time. The book begins with an excellent section on what food means to us. While most health books focus on the disease related issues, Dr. Weil points out that food not only runs our bodies as fuel, but also is a source of pleasure (did you ever think you would hear that from a physician?), a way to create social interaction, a part of health, and a way to address some diseases toward restoring health. The second section is on the basics of what our bodies need. This is where scientific studies are neatly put together into a consistent description. I was especially impressed with the section on fats. It is very easy to omit getting the right fatty acids in your diet, and I was pleased to see this issue addressed well here. The third section then looks at the worst diet you could possibly eat (the fast food diet) and explains why the food is so appealing, yet why those french fries could be the death of you (for more reasons than you probably now know about -- beware of reused cooked fats!). The fourth section goes on to look at the best diet you can eat. Don't worry! It's nothing extreme. In fact, those who are a bit fanatic about their food regimens may be disappointed. I was pleased to find that my regular Saturday lunch of vegetable soup and a half a tuna sandwich are a good idea. There's also no harping on the need to maintain some extremely low weight. Weight is the next subject, and he looks both at how you should think about what your weight should be and how to get to that weight and stay there. A lot of the material on the satisfaction duration of the food you eat will be new and of interest to you. The next section was also very helpful to me. It talks about how to buy food and how to decide what to eat and order in restaurants. Since I travel a lot, I always need help with the latter. I got a number of good ideas. The final section was on recipes that are healthy and quick to make. Many of them sounded very appealing to me, and I was pleased to see that there were

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2001

    Indispensable reading

    Of the many health books I have read, this is undoubtedly one of the best. In addition to providing a wealth of nutritional information, Dr. Weil evaluates various diet plans and exposes the dangers inherent in a number of currently popular ones. He offers medically sound and practical guidelines for healthy and enjoyable eating, stressing that for a diet to be followed successfully over a lifetime it must be a source not only of ample nourishment but also of ample pleasure and that healthful food need involve no compromise in taste. An especially useful feature of the book is the tips it contains for shopping and menu planning as well as for making sensible choices when dining out. Readers will also find Dr. Weil's advice very helpful when consulting cookbooks. For example, following the basic principles set forth in his book, I have discovered a gold mine of great eating in Sonia Uvezian's classic, 'Recipes and Remembrances from an Eastern Mediterranean Kitchen,' which is filled with easy-to-follow recipes for a myriad of dishes that are both wonderfully healthful and exceptionally delicious.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2001

    A true life saver

    Dr. Weil's 8 weeks book was great, but this book made 200% more impact on me. He takes the time to go through and explain the affect of all the different types of food on the body. The affect of the different types of oils and greases, simple sugars, etc. The information is straight forward and simple to understand, but backed up with solid clinical data. Reading this book was a big part of my lossing 85 pounds, and my husband losing 42. My blood pressure was 210/110 with a pulse of 114. Now since changing my diet and following his common sense advice it is 116/70 with a pulse of 58. It works, it works fast (I started his way of eatting at the end of march 2001), and most of all I feel great. The rapid change in my body and health blew my doctor away. I eat great food, and no longer have chest pain. BLESS YOU DR. WEIL. I actually buy people this book, THEN have them read 8 weeks once they have read this book as a nutritional primer. I got this book on tape and listened to it in the car and on walks. Now my dad,a doctor,is listening to it, and loves it too. Change your life, buy this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2000

    Cannot say enough about this book~

    I found this book to be wonderful! Please take the time to read it and incorporate it into your life. You will not be sorry! You will be thinner and healthier in no time!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2002

    Awareness through eating

    Ok, not a weight loss book, but a heathly eating book. On the negative side, too scientific for most readers, complicated to remember, and difficult to 'digest'. Somewhat hard to implement for most Americans, and expensive to do. On the positive side, not as strict as some diet plans out there today. Honest about its limitations.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2000

    Sensibly written

    One of the better diets because it is one in which you eat healthy while losing weight.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2000

    The Best Resource for Food-Related Health Information

    If you are tired of trying to make sense out of all of the conflicting claims about foods, diets, and various diseases, this book is your answer. The author bravely takes on any school of thought about food (including unhealthy ones), and provides a balanced perspective on what is wrong with that approach. Health is not only about eating. It is also about exercise, sleep, relationships with others, genetics, and environment. But for the part of health that relates to food, this book is the be-all and end-all for now. I say that not because of any weakness the book has, but simply because scientific information about health is expanding so rapidly. As Dr. Weil points out, the information he shares in this book is often news to medical students and physicians. Food and health are subjects that are poorly connected in our minds at this time. The book begins with an excellent section on what food means to us. While most health books focus on the disease related issues, Dr. Weil points out that food not only runs our bodies as fuel, but also is a source of pleasure (did you ever think you would hear that from a physician?), a way to create social interaction, a part of health, and a way to address some diseases toward restoring health. The second section is on the basics of what our bodies need. This is where scientific studies are neatly put together into a consistent description. I was especially impressed with the section on fats. It is very easy to omit getting the right fatty acids in your diet, and I was pleased to see this issue addressed well here. The third section then looks at the worst diet you could possibly eat (the fast food diet) and explains why the food is so appealing, yet why those french fries could be the death of you (for more reasons than you probably now know about -- beware of reused cooked fats!).

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2000

    Has Helped Many People Better Their HEALTH AND WELL BEING

    In his book Andrew writes ' a healthy diet is the cornerstone of a healthy lifestyle. You will find in these pages all the information you need to put that cornerstone in place.' In reading this I was reminded of another book called 'WORKING ON YOURSELF DOESN'T WORK: A BOOK ABOUT INSTANTANEOUS TRANSFORMATION' by Ariel and Shya Kane. THIS IS A GREAT BOOK! For me the Kanes' book is the cornerstone of my life being wonderful and satisfying. The Kanes' book is easy to read, inspiring, humorous and life transforming. I whole heartedly recommend the Kanes' book to anyone interested in having a CENTEREDNESS AND WELLNESS FROM WITHIN THEMSELVES. ps The Kanes' tape are also wonderful!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2000

    a real eye opener about a lot of things

    this book is very good if you want to learn about what you should and should not eat. while scientific in nature, dr. weil gives very easy to understand advice(which is synopsised at the end of each chapter)that is simple to follow and easy to live by. i already feel 10x more energetic and lively and i have only been following his guidelines for a few weeks!!!read this book!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2000

    He's done it again!

    Dr. Weil has done it again. A simple clear approach to eating well and staying healthy. This is another great addition to his earlier books. A must read for anyone serious about wellness.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2000

    Totally Wonderful Book for Everyone!

    I enjoyed Weil's prose and humor as well as his exacting knowledge about health and diet. I can't say this book changed my life, but it did change my eating habits and attitude about certain diets and foods. I got my health under control by using hypnosis, meditation with a Light & Sound machine, and Neurosync behavior modification techniques. You really have to take a positive attitude and want change for the benefits and not because you feel obligated. I highly recommend this fine book to everyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2000

    Most excellent guide regarding nutrition

    This is another top book by Dr. Weil and like his others before, it's highly recommended. In this book e.g. he explains exactly how metabolism work and herewith helps us understand what type foods are healthy why others are harmful. Every reader will get something valuable out of this excellent nutritional guide. Sure, this time Dr. Weil explains scientific stuff, but the book doesn't lack practical advice which everybody can understand and utilize. Regarding the philosophical aspect to mental and spiritual health I highly recommend Dietmar Scherf's 'Depression: Avoiding and Overcoming: I Love Me.'

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2000

    Too Much Science, Not Enough Practical Tips

    I bought this book because I'd seen Dr. Weil on TV and liked what he had to say. I agree with his basic premises, and believe that he gives sound advice. The book reinforced this opinion, but I did not particularly enjoy it or find it helpful in a practical way. There is far too much technical, detailed, BORING stuff about metabolism and nutrients. Those parts need to be streamlined. Also, the glycemic index table was very limited. I wanted a longer list of 'good' carbs. The book is really not geared to the masses who will buy it simply becuase it's a well-marketed 'diet' book on a bestseller list. (FYI -if you are thinking this is a book about losing weight, think again. It's simply good advice on how to eat healthily.) I am a vegetarian, and Dr. Weil reinforces my conviction to stay that way. His mantra: 'eat more fruits and vegetables.' And I enjoyed reading his daughter's piece on why she 'eats healthy.' Weil includes his recommendations on vitamin and mineral supplements, which I found helpful. I guess I would recommend the book, but not highly. It's just a tad too intellectual for most of us -- I want a more practical, easy to use guide.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)