Echinoderm Paleobiology

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$47.96
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $44.32
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 26%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (11) from $44.32   
  • New (8) from $44.32   
  • Used (3) from $44.32   

Overview

The dominant faunal elements in shallow Paleozoic oceans, echinoderms are important to understanding these marine ecosystems. Echinoderms (which include such animals as sea stars, crinoids or sea lilies, sea urchins, sand dollars, and sea cucumbers) have left a rich and, for science, extremely useful fossil record. For various reasons, they provide the ideal source for answers to the questions that will help us develop a more complete understanding of global environmental and biodiversity changes. This volume highlights the modern study of fossil echinoderms and is organized into five parts: echinoderm paleoecology, functional morphology, and paleoecology; evolutionary paleoecology; morphology for refined phylogenetic studies; innovative applications of data encoded in echinoderms; and information on new crinoid data sets.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Quarterly Review of Biology
"[An] excellent book.... The advances being made in understanding echinoderm paleobiology are impressive in their diversity and extent, and are well showcased in this book." —Andrew B. Smith, Natural History Museum, London, QUARTERLY REVIEW OF BIOLOGY, Vol. 84 Sept. 2009

— Andrew B. Smith, Natural History Museum, London

Roy Plotnick

"Timely and necessary... the echinoderm fossil record provides the ideal data with which to ask important paleobiologic and evolutionary questions and to expect high—resolution answers." —Roy Plotnick, University of Illinois, Chicago Circle

W. L. Cressler III

Echinoderms have a rich fossil record that provides detailed information about evolutionary processes and the early development of marine ecosystems. This fine volume brings together fruitful new research approaches to the study of echinoderms, especially crinoids. It includes the work of editors/paleobiologists Ausich (Ohio State) and Webster (emer., Washington State), along with that of 42 other top contributors in the echinoderm field. Topics include taphonomy, functional morphology, paleoecology, morphology for refined phylogenetic studies, echinoderm-related evidence for impacts during the Mississippian period, crinoid biomarkers, and various faunal studies. These subjects are covered in 16 original research papers that present new data. In other words, this work is not a comprehensive overview of the biology and evolutionary history of echinoderms. Rather, it is a compilation of recent studies that apply the most current analytic techniques and interpretations to the scientific evidence provided by one very important phylum of organisms. The production values of the volume match the top quality of the research. The numerous black-and-white figures, maps, diagrams, and tables are printed at high resolution. This volume is useful for university libraries and essential for institutions with invertebrate paleobiology programs. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. --Choice W. L. Cressler III, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, August 2009

QUARTERLY REVIEW OF BIOLOGY - Andrew B. Smith

"[An] excellent book.... The advances being made in understanding echinoderm paleobiology are impressive in their diversity and extent, and are well showcased in this book." —Andrew B. Smith, Natural History Museum, London, QUARTERLY REVIEW OF BIOLOGY, Vol. 84 Sept. 2009

From the Publisher
"[An] excellent book.... The advances being made in understanding echinoderm paleobiology are impressive in their diversity and extent, and are well showcased in this book." —Andrew B. Smith, Natural History Museum, London, QUARTERLY REVIEW OF BIOLOGY, Vol. 84 Sept. 2009

"Timely and necessary... the echinoderm fossil record provides the ideal data with which to ask important paleobiologic and evolutionary questions and to expect high—resolution answers." —Roy Plotnick, University of Illinois, Chicago Circle

Echinoderms have a rich fossil record that provides detailed information about evolutionary processes and the early development of marine ecosystems. This fine volume brings together fruitful new research approaches to the study of echinoderms, especially crinoids. It includes the work of editors/paleobiologists Ausich (Ohio State) and Webster (emer., Washington State), along with that of 42 other top contributors in the echinoderm field. Topics include taphonomy, functional morphology, paleoecology, morphology for refined phylogenetic studies, echinoderm-related evidence for impacts during the Mississippian period, crinoid biomarkers, and various faunal studies. These subjects are covered in 16 original research papers that present new data. In other words, this work is not a comprehensive overview of the biology and evolutionary history of echinoderms. Rather, it is a compilation of recent studies that apply the most current analytic techniques and interpretations to the scientific evidence provided by one very important phylum of organisms. The production values of the volume match the top quality of the research. The numerous black-and-white figures, maps, diagrams, and tables are printed at high resolution. This volume is useful for university libraries and essential for institutions with invertebrate paleobiology programs. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. —Choice W. L. Cressler III, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, August 2009

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253351289
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 6/28/2008
  • Series: Life of the Past Series
  • Pages: 472
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 10.20 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

William I. Ausich is Professor of Earth Sciences and Director of the Orton Geological Museum at The Ohio State University. He is an expert in the study of Paleozoic crinoids with an emphasis on paleobiology and evolutionary paleoecology.

Gary D. Webster is Adjunct Faculty of Geology at Washington State University.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

IContents
Introduction / William I. Ausich and Gary D. Webster
Part 1. Functional Morphology, Paleoecology, and Taphonomy
Introduction to Part 1 / William I. Ausich and Gary D. Webster
1. Taphonomy as an Indicator of Behavior among Fossil Crinoids / Tomasz K. Baumiller, Forest J. Gahn, Hans Hess, and Charles G. Messing
2. Attachment, Facies Distribution, and Life History Strategies in Crinoids from the Upper Ordovician of Kentucky / Carlton E. Brett, Bradley L. Deline, and Patrick I. McLaughlin
3. Paleobiology of Carboniferous Microcrinoids / George D. Sevastopulo
4. The Importance of Echinoids in Late Paleozoic Ecosystems / Chris L. Schneider
5. New Observations on Taphonomy and Paleoecology of Uintacrinus socialis Grinnell (Crinoidea; Upper Cretaceous) / Andrew J. Webber, David L. Meyer, and Clare V. Milsom
6. Taphonomy of the Irregular Echinoid Clypeaster humilis from the Red Sea: Implications for Taxonomic Resolution along Taphonomic Grades / James H. Nebelsick
Part 2. Evolutionary Paleoecology
Introduction to Part 2 / William I. Ausich and Gary D. Webster
7. Tiering History of Early Epifaunal Suspension-Feeding Echinoderms / Stephen Q. Dornbos
8. Evolution and Extinction of a Paleozoic Crinoid Clade: Phylogenetics, Paleogeography, and Environmental Distribution of the Periechocrinids / William I. Ausich and Thomas W. Kammer
Part 3. Morphology for Refined Phylogenetic Studies
Introduction to Part 3 / William I. Ausich and Gary D. Webster
9. Paedomorphosis as an Adaptive Response in Pinnulate Cladid Crinoids from the Burlington Limestone (Mississippian, Osagean) of the Mississippi Valley / Thomas W. Kammer
10. Cladid Crinoid Radial Facets, Brachials, and Arm Appendages: A Terminology Solution for Studies of Lineage, Classification, and Paleoenvironment / Gary D. Webster and Christopher G. Maples
11. The Origin of Lovén's Law in Glyptocystitoid Rhombiferans and Its Bearing on the Plate Homology and Heterochronic Evolution of the Hemicosmitoid Peristomial Border / Colin D. Sumrall
Part 4. Mississippian Impacts and Biomakers
Introduction to Part 4 / William I. Ausich and Gary D. Webster
12. Mixed-Age Echinoderms, Conodonts, and Other Fossils Used to Date a Meteorite Impact, and Implications for Missing Strata in the Type Osagean (Mississippian) in Missouri, USA / James F. Miller, Kevin R. Evans, William I. Ausich, Susan E. Bolyard, George H. Davis, Raymond L. Ethington, Charles W. Rovey II, Charles A. Sandberg, Thomas L. Thompson, and Johnny A. Waters
13. Crinoid Biomarkers (Borden Group, Mississippian): Implications for Phylogeny / Christina E. O'Malley, William I. Ausich, and Yu-Ping Chin
Part 5. Echinoderm Faunal Studies
Introduction to Part 5 / William I. Ausich and Gary D. Webster
14. Overview of Early Ordovician Crinoid Diversity from the Western and Southwestern United States / James Sprinkle, Thomas E. Guensburg, and Forest J. Gahn
15. Ever since Ramsbottom: Silurian Crinoids of the British Isles since 1954 / Stephen K. Donovan, David N. Lewis, Rosanne E. Widdison, and Fiona E. Fearnhead
16. Overview of Paleozoic Stemmed Echinoderms from China / Johnny A. Waters, Sara A. Marcus, Christopher G. Maples, N. Gary Lane, Hongfei Hou, Zhouting Liao, Jinxing Wang, and Lujun Liu
17. Fossil Echinodermata from Puerto Rico / Jorge Vélez-Juarbe and Hernán Santos
Appendices
Index

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)