Echo [NOOK Book]

Overview

How can I know what's going to happen?

But somehow he did know. The feeling was like déjà vu but stronger...and scarier. It told him that without a doubt something was going to happen. And it was going to be bad.


***

In the year since Justin's younger brother, Mark, died in a horrific accident, ...
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Echo

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Overview

How can I know what's going to happen?

But somehow he did know. The feeling was like déjà vu but stronger...and scarier. It told him that without a doubt something was going to happen. And it was going to be bad.


***

In the year since Justin's younger brother, Mark, died in a horrific accident, Justin's life has unraveled. Justin used to be one of the school's star athletes, but now he's not even on any of the teams. He used to be part of the popular crowd, but now everyone at school treats him like he's a monster. He used to date one of the prettiest girls at school, but now she will barely speak to him. Then on the anniversary of his brother's death he gets into a fight with his former best friend, and things spiral out of control -- with terrible consequences. But that's not the worst. Now Justin is hearing a voice that's making him relive the day of the accident over and over again.

In this dark thriller, Edgar Award nominee Kate Morgenroth explores the thin line between reality and illusion inside a troubled young mind.
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Janet L. Rose
Justin and his younger brother Mark are watching television from their parents' bed, eating chips, and playing around when their whole world ends. Mark, wanting the remote, grabs his parents' gun and jokingly says for his brother to change the channel or he would kill himself. The next moment Mark is dead and Justin is splattered with blood. In the year that follows, Justin turns against his closest friend and schoolmates. In his self-hate and anger, he lashes out at all who love him. Three times he replays the day of the anniversary of Mark's death, his encounters with students and teachers, how he was kicked out of Biology and slept through History, and how he violently throws his best friend down the stairs. The day always ends with him committing suicide. With every narration and hypnosis, Justin is able to accept more of his role in what happened, and he sees how Mark's death has affected him. Justin's feelings and actions are realistic. The reader will be able to see the horror with which Justin lives and understand how easy it is to lash out at the people who care the most for you. Strong language is used.
VOYA - Francisca Goldsmith
A year ago, Justin had a pesky younger brother. Now Mark is dead, and Justin is alienated from his parents and his former friends. His only social interaction seems to be with the voice that asks him nagging questions: "What are you doing now?" Justin pulls himself through a school day-ostracized at breakfast, ridiculed on the bus, attacked in the cafeteria, and derided in the auditorium by his ex-girlfriend. The day ends in another tragedy when Justin pushes his former best friend down a long flight of stairs. The reader, like Justin, is appalled to find that these events are repeated when he next awakes. Unlike the movie Groundhog Day, however, there is little humor, but there are subtle differences as Justin relives the day and then relives it yet again and again. Morgenroth creates a character from whom the reader cannot turn away, even as Justin's perceptions seem to become increasingly unreliable-or is it more reliable? Hypnosis used in the aid of psychiatry eventually accounts for the cause of the echo of Justin's day. The concept is made accessible and intriguing here, and the story will appeal not only to readers of the likes of Patricia McCormick's Cut (Front Street, 2000/VOYA February 2001) but also to fans of Robert Cormier's suspenseful novels where psychological acuity is bound with physical danger.
KLIATT - Janis Flint-Ferguson
Justin and his younger brother Mark are left home alone. While goofing around, Mark picks up a gun and accidentally kills himself. A year later, the family is understandably dysfunctional. Justin's mother ignores him, his father lectures him about his attitude, and his best friend bullies him in school. Justin's former girlfriend has turned against him and he ends up in the principal's office yet again after a hallway altercation. Or is something else going on? After readers are taken through Justin's day with him, another perspective is presented and the same day repeats itself. But it repeats itself with some minor yet significant changes, changes that lead us to wonder if the previous events happened that way at all. There is no doubt that Justin has lived through a traumatic accident, and the echo of that day continues to affect who he is and how he responds. In a third retelling, we start to piece together the "real" story, catching a glimpse of the boy in emotional trouble. Justin's story and the echoes of the day his brother was shot provide both an in-depth look at PTS syndrome and at the subtleties and significance of detail. Is it his mother who is distant or Justin? Is it Billy who bullies? Is it Mark who pulled the trigger? With each new detail revealed, the truth of that day and ultimately that accident slowly become apparent. Like Justin, we are compelled to find out the truth.
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up
In a prologue, 12-year-old Mark, who is horsing around with his older brother, Justin, accidentally shoots himself with their father's gun. The rest of the story, set a year later, shows the tragedy's effects on Justin, who has become an outsider-emotionally disconnected from his parents, avoided by classmates, and frequently in trouble at school. His anger reaches a head on the anniversary of Mark's death. Prodded forward by a mysterious internal voice, Justin describes the events and personal interactions leading up to a fight at school with his former best friend, Billy. During the scuffle, Billy falls down a set of stairs. Presuming him to be dead, a devastated Justin returns home and attempts suicide. When he awakens, he finds himself experiencing the same day over again and again, each time revealing new aspects of the events-and of himself. As the incidents are repeated, with subtle changes in Justin's attitudes and perceptions, the novel takes on a surreal tone-will the teen be forced to relive this day forever? While the final twist isn't as dramatic as one might expect, the book's exploration of how one's memories and perspectives can distort reality is compelling. The short narrative, broken down into brief, straightforward chapters, makes this novel a good choice for reluctant readers.
—Christi VothCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
What would you do if you had to live one of the worst days of your life over and over again? After witnessing his younger brother Mark die in a horrific accident, Justin finds himself utterly isolated-from his friends, his girlfriend and his family. His only companion is an unceasing, unrelenting voice in his head. One year to the day of Mark's death, things go indescribably wrong for Justin, and in a fit of despair, he seeks to end his own life, only to wake up in that fateful day again and again. This dark, frenetically paced psychological novel is sure to mesmerize readers, as they follow Justin in his maddening struggle to distinguish between reality and illusion, and his struggle with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Morgenroth's writing is meticulous, to the point where her words are economical; a welcome change after many of the epic works for teens on the market. An ingenious twist at the end will surely leave its reader stunned. An electrifying read. (Fiction. YA)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439103975
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 5/12/2009
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 661,850
  • Age range: 12 years
  • File size: 204 KB

Meet the Author

Kate Morgenroth is the author of the adult thrillers Kill Me First and Saved. She lives in New York City. Visit her Web site at katemorgenroth.com.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 28, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Wardrip, aka "The Genius" for TeensReadToo.com

    It's never easy to lose a sibling. When you actually see your younger brother die in front of you, though, it's even worse. <BR/><BR/>That's what happened when Justin, playing around with his twelve-year-old brother, Mark, saw his brother accidentally shoot himself in the head with their father's gun. For almost a year now, Justin has been plagued by ever-increasing problems. The guilt is horrible, as are the questions that keep running through his mind: Was Mark's death his fault? Did Mark really shoot himself by accident? <BR/><BR/>Although Justin is supposed to be on medication to help with his depression, he's stopped taking it. There's a voice inside his head that makes him relive his brother's death over and over again on a daily basis. His mother is alternately hostile and nonchalant towards her remaining son. His father doesn't have much to say beyond "don't upset your mother." In this family, guilt is a constant, nagging reminder of what could have been, and what is instead. <BR/><BR/>Ms. Morgenroth is great at creating realistic situations and characters that pull at the heartstrings. Although you can see this family breaking down inside the pages of ECHO, it's not immediately clear how each family member is dealing with Mark's death -- or, rather, not dealing with it. <BR/><BR/>I recommend this book for older teens, especially those who have dealt with loss and/or depression. ECHO is a psychological thriller that you won't want to miss.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 27, 2011

    Emma Buddecke

    This book is so good!The idea of living the same day over and over is so thrilling!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2008

    Will leave you going back for more

    Echo, a book about an emotionally distrubed high school student is one of the better books I've read in a while. This book confuses you making you keep reading page after page, until you reach the shockin end

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2008

    Echo: A Must-Read Book

    I think the way that Echo was told, effectively allowed the reader to see the trauma and depression of a boy facing an unimaginable tragedy. The writing was certainly powerful and it was hard to put the book down as the mesmerizing text took you to another place. I found the story to be sad, but very interesting and moving. When reading the book, the language was so realistic that it seemed to bring the tale to life. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading because it has a very original style, which allows the reader to become consumed by the book. It vividly shows how one¿s life can be altered after a tragedy and opens the reader¿s eyes to understanding and sympathy. Overall, Echo was a very touching book that I thoroughly enjoyed reading. The book made me look at life in a different light and allowed me to understand what others go through and the intensity of trying to cope with trauma. Although for instance, Justin might have seemed like a mean-spirited individual to those who didn¿t know him, the reader can see his hardships and what he is trying to overcome and can respect him. Reading this book can open one¿s eyes to the world around them and I strongly suggest this book for that reason.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2007

    top ten

    Sometimes you find a book that seems really interesting. Once you go out and look at it you see that it has five hundred pages and you think well maybe not then. If so, then this is a great book for you. With aboutone hundred and forty pages you will love it by the end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2007

    Read Echo

    Echo, is for readers who like stories that are somewhat real. This book is easy to get into, and a book that you dont want to put down. There is two brothers, and one dies from a tragic accident, and the other is left to deal with it, by himself.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2007

    Echo not just a sound.

    Have you ever found it difficult to put a book down because you found the book to be so realistic that is just pulled you in, Echo is one of those books. The author achieved the purpose of not wanting you to stop reading until you found out what really was going on that day of Mark¿s one year anniversary of his tragic death and what has happened to his older brother Justin. The writing is very effective and powerful that makes you wonder if what you are reading is actually happening right here, right now. The book at first is hard to follow but as you get to know the characters you feel what is going on around them. If you are the kind of person who doesn¿t mind reading a book all the way through and likes to think while reading, Echo is the book for you.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2007

    Wow

    Kate Morgenroth made this book very easy to read by creating a captivating plot that encourages readers to continue reading in order to discover what happens it¿s a story that can be read in one sitting because you won¿t want to put it down. She made it so interesting by incorporating creative twists and revealing information gradually which pushes you to want to know what was coming next. In addition, she creates likable characters and reveals interesting information about them throughout the book, which also evokes emotion from the reader.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2007

    A reviewer

    It's never easy to lose a sibling. When you actually see your younger brother die in front of you, though, it's even worse. That's what happened when Justin, playing around with his twelve-year-old brother, Mark, saw his brother accidentally shoot himself in the head with their father's gun. For almost a year now, Justin has been plagued by ever-increasing problems. The guilt is horrible, as are the questions that keep running through his mind: Was Mark's death his fault? Did Mark really shoot himself by accident? Although Justin is supposed to be on medication to help with his depression, he's stopped taking it. There's a voice inside his head that makes him relive his brother's death over and over again on a daily basis. His mother is alternately hostile and nonchalant towards her remaining son. His father doesn't have much to say beyond 'don't upset your mother.' In this family, guilt is a constant, nagging reminder of what could have been, and what is instead. Ms. Morgenroth is great at creating realistic situations and characters that pull at the heartstrings. Although you can see this family breaking down inside the pages of ECHO, it's not immediately clear how each family member is dealing with Mark's death -- or, rather, not dealing with it. I recommend this book for older teens, especially those who have dealt with loss and/or depression. ECHO is a psychological thriller that you won't want to miss. **Reviewed by: Jennifer Wardrip, aka 'The Genius'

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews

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