Echoes of my Soul

Echoes of my Soul

4.3 8
by Robert K. Tanenbaum
     
 

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"Stunning, riveting." --Linda Fairstein

"Tanenbaum knows this territory better than anyone." –Linda Fairstein

It was a muggy summer day when Janice Wylie and Emily Hoffert were murdered in their apartment on Manhattan's Upper East Side. Months passed before police arrested George Whitmore, Jr., and he confessed to the crime. But his incarceration… See more details below

Overview

"Stunning, riveting." --Linda Fairstein

"Tanenbaum knows this territory better than anyone." –Linda Fairstein

It was a muggy summer day when Janice Wylie and Emily Hoffert were murdered in their apartment on Manhattan's Upper East Side. Months passed before police arrested George Whitmore, Jr., and he confessed to the crime. But his incarceration would entail a host of shocking law enforcement missteps and cover-ups. In this first insider's account, New York Times bestselling author Robert K. Tanenbaum delivers a page-turning real-life thriller about this historic case--from the brutal crime to the wrenching conviction, which forever reformed the American justice system.

"A true crime classic, brilliantly written and unfailingly riveting." --Vincent Bugliosi

"Thrilling and insightful." –Publishers Weekly

"A nonfiction murder mystery, an intriguing saga." --Kirkus Reviews

With 16 Pages Of Dramatic Photos

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In his third true crime offering (after The Piano Teacher), Tanenbaum—best known for his legal thrillers about Butch Karp and Marlene Ciampi, lawyers in the New York District Attorney’s office—examines the convoluted and dramatic case that followed the brutal murders of two young women, Janice Wylie and Emily Hoffert, in New York City in 1963. Relying on court transcripts, crime-scene photos, and the reminiscences of his legal mentors—Mel Glass, John Keenan, and D.A. Frank Hogan, all of whom were involved in the case—Tanenbaum recreates the proceedings with a novelist’s sense of plotting. The seasoned attorney and two-time mayor of Beverly Hills, Calif., details how a young black man, George Whitmore Jr. (who had an IQ of less than 70), was connected to the killings by a confession extracted under extreme duress. Luckily, Manhattan Assistant D.A. Glass took an interest in the case and began to question the police tactics used to accuse Whitmore. A clue worthy of crime fiction eventually leads to the capture of the real killer, and a trial cleverly conducted by Keenan reveals police incompetence (and possible malfeasance) and sets Whitmore free. Tanenbaum’s take on the case, which was cited by the Supreme Court in its 1966 Miranda v. State of Arizona decision regarding self-incrimination, is a thrilling and insightful addition to the true crime genre. Photos. Agent: Bob Diforio, D4EO Literary Agency. (May 28)
Kirkus Reviews
A former New York prosecuting attorney and prolific novelist recounts miscarriages of justice on the way to solving a highly publicized 1963 double murder. Tanenbaum (Bad Faith, 2012, etc.) learned legal ethics and courtroom tactics from New York District Attorney Frank Hogan and Hogan's assistants Mel Glass and John Keenan. This nonfiction murder mystery is intended as a tribute to those three, who realized police had arrested the wrong man after the August 28, 1963, murder of roommates Emily Hoffert and Janice Wylie on the Upper East Side. Suspicion cast on George Whitmore Jr. in that case also led to felony charges against him in two Brooklyn cases. Using archival material and relying to some extent on his memory, Tanenbaum explains the tunnel vision, racism and overaggressiveness of police and prosecutors that led to the mistreatment of Whitmore. Eventually, the shoddy treatment of Whitmore figured into the historic Supreme Court ruling requiring law enforcement officers to issue Miranda warnings to suspects. In a parallel narrative, Tanenbaum also shows how Glass engineered the new investigation leading to the arrest and conviction of the actual murderer, Richard Robles. Many of the elements of the narrative are inherently fascinating: the circumstances of the crimes in Manhattan and Brooklyn, the police investigations, the prosecutors' deliberations and the courtroom dramatics. Unfortunately, the author hampers the narrative flow with extended quotations that are obviously re-created using far too much novelistic license, and he also made the questionable decision to grant false names to 19 real-life characters, including police detectives, which calls into question the credibility of the story. Furthermore, page after page is filled with clichéd writing. An intriguing saga that should have been better presented.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786034949
Publisher:
Kensington
Publication date:
05/27/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
39,014
File size:
2 MB

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