Eclipse in Action: A Guide for the Java Developer

Overview

Eclipse is a new open-source, Java-based, extensible development platform designed for nothing in particular but everything in general. Because of its roots, it is currently most popular as a Java integrated development environment (IDE). Eclipse ships with plugins for writing and debugging Java code. Additional plugins for more advanced Java development, such as JSP/servlets, are available from third parties.

This book provides a thorough guide to using Eclipse features and ...

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Overview

Eclipse is a new open-source, Java-based, extensible development platform designed for nothing in particular but everything in general. Because of its roots, it is currently most popular as a Java integrated development environment (IDE). Eclipse ships with plugins for writing and debugging Java code. Additional plugins for more advanced Java development, such as JSP/servlets, are available from third parties.

This book provides a thorough guide to using Eclipse features and plugins effectively in the context of real-world Java development. Realistic examples demonstrate how to use Eclipse effectively to build, test and debug applications using the tools provided by Eclipse and other third-party open source plugins. The reader will learn how to use plugin tools for using Eclipse in a team environment, including using Ant for more sophisticated build processes and CVS for source control. Plugin-ins for building web applications, using J2EE technologies, such as JSP/Servlets and EJB, are also discussed.

Complementing this coverage of Eclipse in the context of development is a reference providing a comprehensive guide to Eclipse. Because Eclipse and its plugins provide a remarkable array of features, it is often hard to learn what features are available and how they can be invoked. This reference lays things out clearly: feature-by-feature, menu-by-menu.

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Editorial Reviews

JavaRanch.com
The technical information is dead on...I'd definitely recommend this book to anyone.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781930110960
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/30/2003
  • Pages: 383
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.93 (d)

Meet the Author

David Gallardo is an independent software consultant and author specializing in software internationalization, Java web applications, and database development. He has been a professional software engineer for over fifteen years and has experience with many operating systems, programming languages, and network protocols. He is also the author of "Java Oracle Database Development." He lives in El Paso, Texas. Ed Burnette is a Principal Systems Developer at SAS, where he has worked on such diverse projects as compilers, debuggers, device drivers, performance tuning, and UNIX ports. He also helped write several commercial computer games. Currently, Ed uses Eclipse in the development of OLAP servers, mid-tier providers, and clients written in a mixture of C, Java, and C#. He lives near Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Robert McGovern is a software developer for an international high voltage power supply company doing embedded development. He has a degree in artificial intelligence and is a member of the IEEE and the ACM. His personal interest is in Java & Ruby and he has been involved in computers and programming since the days of the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Robert lives in West Sussex, England.

David Gallardo is an independent software consultant specializing in software internationalization, Java web applications, and database development. His recent experience includes leading database and internationalization development at a business-to-business e-commerce company, TradeAccess, Inc. He was also a senior engineer in the international product development group at Lotus Development Corporation, where he contributed to the development of a cross-platform library providing Unicode and international language support for Lotus products including Notes and 1-2-3. He is the author of Java Oracle Database Development. He lives in El Paso, Texas. Ed Burnette is a principal systems developer at SAS, where he has worked on such diverse projects as compilers, debuggers, device drivers, performance tuning, and UNIX ports. He also helped write several commercial computer games. Currently, Ed uses Eclipse in the development of OLAP servers, mid-tier providers, and clients written in a mixture of C, Java, and C#. He lives near Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Robert McGovern is a software developer for an international high voltage power supply company doing embedded development. He has a degree in artificial intelligence.

Robert P. McGovern, forty, was born in New Jersey just a few miles from the Meadowlands Sports Complex. After graduating from Holy Cross College, he surprised scouts and even himself by getting drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs. He made the team, and later played for the Pittsburgh Steelers and the New England Patriots. After his NFL days were over, he attended Fordham University's law school, went to work as a prosecutor, and brought those legal skills with him when he was assigned as a judge advocate general in the U.S. Army's 18th Airborne Corps. He helped prosecute the notorious case of Sergeant Hasan Akbar, accused of killing two army comrades in Kuwait. After tours of duty in Afghanistan and Iraq, McGovern is currently stationed in Virginia.

Bob Foster has worked for several decades as a business turnaround specialist and successful entrepreneur. With a direct and unorthodox approach, Bob specializes in saving businesses that have been deemed unsalvageable. He currently lives in Henderson, Nevada.

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Table of Contents

Foreword xvii
Preface xxi
Acknowledgments xxiii
About this book xxv
About the title xxix
About the cover illustration xxx
Part 1 Using Eclipse 1
1 Overview 3
1.1 Where Eclipse came from 4
1.2 What is Eclipse? 7
1.3 What's next 11
1.4 Summary 11
2 Getting started with the Eclipse Workbench 13
2.1 Obtaining Eclipse 14
2.2 Eclipse overview 15
2.3 The Java quick tour 20
2.4 Preferences and other settings 31
2.5 Summary 37
3 The Java development cycle: test, code, repeat 39
3.1 Java development tools methodology 40
3.2 The JUnit unit testing framework 43
3.3 Further adventures in debugging 62
3.4 Logging with log4j 68
3.5 Summary 77
4 Working with source code in Eclipse 79
4.1 Importing an external project 80
4.2 Extending the persistence component 83
4.3 Refactoring 95
4.4 Summary 102
5 Building with Ant 103
5.1 The need for an official build process 104
5.2 Make: A retrospective 109
5.3 The new Java standard: Ant 112
5.4 A sample Ant build 131
5.5 Summary 140
6 Source control with CVS 143
6.1 The need for source control 144
6.2 Using CVS with Eclipse 146
6.3 Summary 174
7 Web development tools 177
7.1 Developing for the Web 178
7.2 Tomact and the Sysdeo Tomcat plug-in 181
7.3 Building a web application 191
7.4 Wrapping up the sample application 210
7.5 Summary 215
Part 2 Extending Eclipse 217
8 Introduction to Eclipse plug-ins 219
8.1 Plug-ins and extension points 220
8.2 The Plug-in Development Environment (PDE) 223
8.3 The "Hello, World" plug-in example 228
8.4 The log4j library plug-in example 242
8.5 Deploying a plug-in 246
8.6 Summary 247
9 Working with plug-ins in Eclipse 249
9.1 The log4j integration plug-in example 250
9.2 Editors (TextEditor) 254
9.3 Views (ViewPart) 279
9.4 Preferences (FieldEditorPreferencePage) 301
9.5 Plugin class 304
9.6 Summary 305
A Java perspective menu reference 307
B CVS installation procedures 323
B.1 Installing CVS on UNIX and Linux 324
Creating the CVS repository 325
Setting up SSH Remote access 326
Setting up pserver remote access 327
B.2 Installing CVS on Mac OS X 328
B.3 Installing CVSNT on Windows 329
B.4 Installing Cygwin CVS and SSH on Windows 330
B.5 Troubleshooting the CVS installation 332
B.6 Backing up the CVS repository 332
C Plug-in extension points 333
D Introduction to SWT 343
D.1 What is the Standard Widget Toolkit? 344
D.2 SWT architecture 345
Widget creation 346
Resource disposal 346
D.3 SWT and events 347
D.4 SWT and threads 348
D.5 Building and running SWT programs 350
D.6 Using SWT 353
The BasicFramerwork class 353
The MainApp class 356
Trying the example 359
E Introduction to JFace 361
E.1 Architecture 362
E.2 Building a JFace application 363
JFaceExample class 364
ExitAction class 366
Index 369
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2004

    A Good Textbook on Eclipse

    This book is a very good explanation of what Eclipse is and does. It does assume the reader is somewhat familiar with IDEs and quite familiar with Java. It describes the reasons for Eclipse coming about and the way it is different from other IDEs. It gives some description of how to use it to start a project and how to set some preferences and properties. It does not give all the various details about every preference and property but does give some idea about how to find out what they are and do. The examples it uses are on some very basic and useful features that Eclipse has integrated well. There is an overview on the Junit plugin and how to use it to do unit testing. Eclipse was designed with the focus on Agile or 'Extreme' programming style. The examples are decribed in the language of that paradigm. The unusual part of the book's style is how it presents an example of a problem and a solution, and then it may state that this isn't the best way to solve this problem and presents an alternative approach that is more practical, and so on. In this style, the book is more of a textbook and less of a reference. You need to read the whole book and proceed with examples as if it were a series of classroom lectures rather than as a way to quickly find out how to do something. Many of the example programs that can be downloaded from the website don't actually work but serve to demonstrate some feature of Eclipse. One frustration, which I find in many such books, is that the example problems are uninteresting and trite. Many such books offer some baloney programs such as a car/vehicle/machine issue, which can be rather boring and pointless. This book offers a similarly boring problem of a star finder. I would love to see a book whose example yields an application that I might actually care to use. The book also describes how to use the Ant plugin, which is useful for someone building a large application with many setting options. Eclipse provides a way to tie all the various Ant features into a neat package. Since I had never used Ant or Junit these discussions were very useful but for someone with experience with them may be less enlightening. The book also covers briefly how to use Eclipse's source control features and how to use a Tomcat server within Eclipse. These are features that probably everyone needs to use and the book discusses how to set them up to work with and be controlled from within Eclipse. These do require some reader ability and familiarity with the tools. You may need to do some outside reading if you do not have a CVS server or have not installed Tomcat before.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2003

    Code like you've got three hands!!

    If you've wondered if switching to Eclipse can improve your productivity, check out the guy on the cover with three hands! I've been using Eclipse for over a year now and can't believe how much I was missing. Sure, I knew about Ant integration, but the book explains why some of my scripts run fine in command line and not from Eclipse. JUnit, CVS, log4j and Tomcat integration are all detailed as well. Eclipse in Action shows you how to create your own simple plug-ins, manage your coding activities and get the most out of this way cool IDE.

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