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Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East
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Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East

by Deborah Amos
 

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From Amman to Beirut and Damascus, award-winning NPR reporter Deborah Amos follows Sunnis living in exile—the largest exile population in postwar history. Husbands are separated from wives, children from parents, and many are cast into a violent and uncaring subculture in which they have few rights and no roots. Even college-educated women are forced to turn

Overview

From Amman to Beirut and Damascus, award-winning NPR reporter Deborah Amos follows Sunnis living in exile—the largest exile population in postwar history. Husbands are separated from wives, children from parents, and many are cast into a violent and uncaring subculture in which they have few rights and no roots. Even college-educated women are forced to turn to prostitution. The decisions they make illuminate the human side of the post-conflict displacement in the Middle East and give voice to the trauma of the exiles who must choose daily between dignity and survival.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Bill Moyers
“Memo to President Obama: Take this book with you to Camp David for the weekend. Then insist your foreign policy and national security teams read it, and schedule a time to test them orally on their retention. The reporting here contains the seeds of our future in Iraq and the Middle East.”

Publishers Weekly
“Millions of Iraqis, mostly Sunnis, [have] fled the country, creating a refugee crisis that has only recently been acknowledged as such by the U.S. government…. Amos deftly examines the political and cultural consequences of the marginalization of the Sunnis while focusing on individual Iraqis who have fled to such countries as Syria and Lebanon in the wake of a new sectarian and tribal-based order in Iraq…. Amos’s breathtaking work implicates not only shortsighted American policy but the age-old schism between Sunni and Shia and the cagey maneuverings of such meddling neighbors as Syria. The weight and complexity of the Iraqi problem is on full display, with shreds of hope pushing through the layers like scrub in the desert.”

Trudy Rubin, Philadelphia Inquirer
“A fascinating new book.”

Washington Post
“Poignant… Powerful…. Amos is a skillful writer and a perceptive analyst…. Eclipse of the Sunnis is persuasive and very well written.”

George Packer, author of The Assassin’s Gate: America in Iraq and Interesting Times: Writings from a Turbulent Decade
"Deborah Amos stuck around to trace the fallout from the Iraq War after most other journalists had moved on. And she already had decades of experience in the region under her belt. This commitment to the story has allowed her to see the war in its true historical context: as a Middle Eastern earthquake that will forever change the power equation between Sunnis and Shia, and as a vast human tragedy. These are not abstractions in ‘Eclipse of the Sunnis’: Amos’ intelligence and heart as a reporter make the fate of Iraq’s millions of refugees unforgettably intimate.”

Bob Carey, vice president of Resettlement and Migration Policy at the International Rescue Committee; chair of Refugee Council USA
“A compelling book. Deborah Amos documents the collapse of a rich culture and society and violence behind the creation of a global diaspora. Amos movingly details the human toll of the war. She gives a face and a voice to the hundreds of thousands of refugees who are the forgotten collateral damage of the conflict.”

Thomas W. Lippman
Amos is a skillful writer and a perceptive analyst…Eclipse of the Sunnis is persuasive and very well written, filled with deft turns of phrase…a powerful antidote to any lingering optimism about the Middle East.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
While the U.S. military “surge” began to suppress violence in Iraq in 2007, a surge of another kind with more catastrophic consequences was already in full swing. Millions of Iraqis, mostly Sunnis, fled the country, creating a refugee crisis that has only recently been acknowledged as such by the U.S. government. Veteran reporter Amos traces the exodus and the effects of the shift in power from the formerly Sunni-backed regime of Saddam to the Shiite government erected by the U.S. invasion. She deftly examines the political and cultural consequences of the marginalization of the Sunnis while focusing on individual Iraqis who have fled to such countries as Syria and Lebanon in the wake of a new sectarian and tribal-based order in Iraq. Exiles themselves ruminate over whether years of dictatorship, U.N. sanctions, war, and persecution have eroded Iraqi identity. Amos’s breathtaking work implicates not only shortsighted American policy but the age-old schism between Sunni and Shia and the cagey maneuverings of such meddling neighbors as Syria. The weight and complexity of the Iraqi problem is on full display, with shreds of hope pushing through the layers like scrub in the desert. (Mar.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586486495
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Publication date:
03/09/2010
Pages:
230
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Deborah Amos's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition. For a decade she reported for television news, including ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight and the PBS programs NOW with Bill Moyers and Frontline. She lives in New York City.

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