Economic Efficiency in Law and Economics

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $39.78
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 23%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $39.78   
  • New (6) from $47.69   
  • Used (4) from $39.78   

Overview

Richard Zerbe introduces a new way to think about the concept of economic efficiency that is both consistent with its historical derivation and more useful than concepts currently used. He establishes an expanded version of Kaldor-Hicks efficency as an axiomatic system that performs the following tasks: the new approach obviates certain technical and ethical criticisms that have been made of economic efficiency; it answers critics of efficiency; it allows an expanded range for efficiency analysis; it establishes the conditions under which economists can reasonably say that some state of the world is inefficient. He then applies the new analysis to a number of hard and fascinating cases. He develops a new theory of common law efficiency and indicates the circumstances under which the common law will be inefficient.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
In light of recent assertions about links between economic efficiency and government actions, Zerbe (public affairs, and law, U. of Washington) sets out to create a firm foundation for the concept of efficiency. He suggests criteria for defining efficiency and demonstrates how they can be used to judge one of the most concrete expressions of the collective will: the creation of law. He strips the current concept to expose its moral and ethical basis, then builds a similar one, which differs in small but crucial ways from the traditional concept. He christens his achievement the Kaldor-Hicks- Zerbe (KHZ) measures of economic efficiency. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

1 History of the concept of economic efficiency 1
2 The foundation: A new measure for economic efficiency 14
3 The nature of economic efficiency 34
4 The nature of inefficiency 65
5 Rights and the relationship of law to efficiency 84
6 The problem of missing values in normative law and economic analysis 134
7 The failure of market failure 164
8 Of distributive justice and economic efficiency: An integrated theory of the common law 188
9 The efficiency of the common law: An economic analysis of dueling, cannibalism, the gold rush, racism, and antitrust law 236
10 A recapitulation 291
References 298
Name index 321
Subject index 325
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)