Economic Inputs, Legal Outputs: The Role of Economists in Modern Antitrust

Economic Inputs, Legal Outputs: The Role of Economists in Modern Antitrust

by Fred S. McChesney, Paul Rubin
     
 

Modern antitrust, an outgrowth of industrial organization, has grown from a nineteenth-century American issue aimed at economic phenomena - but derived from mixed political and legal origins - to a more global concern. Highly publicized legal cases involving corporations such as Microsoft, General Electric, Eastman Kodak and Toys 'R' Us have made us increasingly

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Overview

Modern antitrust, an outgrowth of industrial organization, has grown from a nineteenth-century American issue aimed at economic phenomena - but derived from mixed political and legal origins - to a more global concern. Highly publicized legal cases involving corporations such as Microsoft, General Electric, Eastman Kodak and Toys 'R' Us have made us increasingly aware of how important and influential economists are in the area of modern antitrust law. Contributions in this book, by internationally-renowned authors, aim to increase the awareness and understanding of the work of economists in antitrust law. The contributions derive not just from academic analysis of industrial organization issues, but also from the authors' work in dozens of antitrust legal proceedings on behalf of the government, private plaintiffs and private defendants. Topics covered include the role of economists in issues of antitrust liability, market power, market definition and, finally, the effect of economists on antitrust - and vice versa.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471970743
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
06/28/1998
Series:
Wiley Series in Managerial Economics Series
Pages:
190
Product dimensions:
7.78(w) x 9.82(h) x 0.72(d)

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