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Economic Sanctions Reconsidered
     

Economic Sanctions Reconsidered

by Kimberly Ann Elliott
 
The fall of the Berlin Wall has allowed the United Nations to intervene more aggressively in international affairs, including the imposition of mandatory economic sanctions nine times compared to just twice prior to 1990. The second edition of the Institute's influential study on economic sanctions thoroughly updated the first one to address these new developments

Overview

The fall of the Berlin Wall has allowed the United Nations to intervene more aggressively in international affairs, including the imposition of mandatory economic sanctions nine times compared to just twice prior to 1990. The second edition of the Institute's influential study on economic sanctions thoroughly updated the first one to address these new developments arising from the end of the Cold War and the increasing globalization of the world economy.

Now, a new third edition of the study chronicles and examines 170 cases of economic sanctions imposed since World War I. Fifty of these cases were launched in the 1990s and are new to the third edition. Examples of the case studies may be found on the Institute's website (www.iie.com). Analyzing a range of economic and political factors that can influence the success of a sanctions episode, the authors distill a set of "commandments" to guide policymakers in the effective use of sanctions.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780881324075
Publisher:
Peterson Institute for International Economics
Publication date:
01/28/2008
Pages:
233
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Gary Clyde Hufbauer, Reginald Jones Senior Fellow since 1992, was formerly the Maurice Greenberg Chair and Director of Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (1996–98), the Marcus Wallenberg Professor of International Finance Diplomacy at Georgetown University (1985–92), senior fellow at the Institute (1981–85), deputy director of the International Law Institute at Georgetown University (1979–81); deputy assistant secretary for international trade and investment policy of the US Treasury (1977–79); and director of the international tax staff at the Treasury (1974–76).

Jeffrey J. Schott joined the Peterson Institute for International Economics in 1983 and is a senior fellow working on international trade policy and economic sanctions. Durgaing his tenure at the Institute, Schott was also a visiting lecturer at Princeton University (1994) and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University (1986–88). He was a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (1982–83) and an official of the US Treasury Department (1974–82) in international trade and energy policy. Durgaing the Tokyo Round of multilateral trade negotiations, he was a member of the US delegation that negotiated the GATT Subsidies Code. Since January 2003, he has been a member of the Trade and Environment Policy Advisory Committee of the US government. He is also a member of the State Department's Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy.

Kimberly Ann Elliott, former visiting fellow, is a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development. She is the author or coauthor of numerous books and articles on a variety of trade policy and globalization issues. Much of her work focuses on the uses of economic leverage in international negotiations, including both economic sanctions for foreign policy goals and trade threats and sanctions in commercial disputes.

Barbara Oegg is a consultant to the Peterson Institute for International Economics. She was a research associate at the Institute from 1998 to 2004. She has coauthored numerous articles on economic sanctions, including The Impact of Economic Sanctions on US Trade: Andrew Rose's Gravity Model (2003), Capital-Market Access: New Frontier in the Sanctions Debate (2002), and Using Sanctions to Fight Terrorism (2001). She is coauthor of Economic Sanctions Reconsidered, 3rd edition (2007).

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