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The Economics of Health and Health Care / Edition 7

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Overview

The text that makes economics concepts the backbone of the health care coverage.

Folland is the bestselling Health Care Economics text that teaches through core economic themes, rather than concepts unique to the health care economy.

Covers microeconomic tools for health economics, imperfect agency & supplier-induced demand, consumer choice, etc.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
New edition of an introduction to the economics of health and health care that develops and explains economic ideas and models and reflects the full spectrum of the most current health economics literature. In the 26 chapters, Folland (economics, Oakland U.), Allen C. Goodman (economics, Wayne State U.) and Miron Stano (economics and management, Oakland U.) provide analytic tools of economics and econometrics as applied to contemporary health issues. Topics include basic economic tools, supply and demand, information, insurance and organization of health providers, technology, labor, hospitals and nursing homes, social insurance, and policy issues and analyses. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132773690
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 3/14/2012
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 7
  • Pages: 624
  • Sales rank: 240,900
  • Product dimensions: 8.30 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

This is the third edition of a book that was conceived in 1990 and first published in 1993. To indicate how much the world of health economics has changed, the first edition made a single reference to "managed care," and that was in the context of monopoly power in the provision of health care. In addition, the debate on the Clinton health plan illuminated a large set of issues that invigorated the discipline of health economics.

This book was first written to assist health economics instructors in developing a clear, step-by-step understanding of health economics for their students. We also believe that it is important for instructors to show what health economics researchers are doing in theory and in empirical work. The book synthesizes contemporary developments around a set of basic economic principles, including maximization of consumer utility (or well-being) and economic profit, wishing to make these principles accessible to undergraduate students, as well as to graduate students. Rather than organizing the book around the institutions specific to the health care economy, we have used core economics themes as basic as supply and demand, as venerable as technology or labor issues, and as modern as the economics of information. Moreover, we have sought to improve accessibility to the book for the wide range of health services students and practitioners whose knowledge of economics may be more limited.

We have followed the philosophy that students must have a working knowledge of the analytical tools of economics and econometrics to appreciate the field of health economics. Some students may be ready to plunge directly intoCost-Benefit Analysis (chapter 4) or The Production of Health (chapter 5) upon completion of the introductory chapter 1. However, chapters 2 (Microeconomic Tools) and 3 (Statistical Tools) allow the students and their teachers to develop or to review the needed analytical concepts before tackling the core subject matter. In chapters 2 and 3, students with as little as one semester of microeconomics may review and study how economists analyze problems, using examples that are relevant to health economics. No calculus is needed.

Consistent with an emphasis on clarity of exposition, this book makes extensive use of graphs, tables, and charts. Discussion questions and exercises are provided to help students master the basics and to prompt them to think about the issues. Features on up-to-date applications of theory and policy developments are also included, as well as the occasional tidbit containing purely background information.

Finally, we caution that some of the chapters, such as those on insurance, although devoid of advanced mathematics, may still require considerable effort. No painless way is available to appreciate the scope of the contributions that scholars have made in recent years. Sections or subsections that are more demanding and/or peripheral to the core material have been identified. These sections can be omitted without detracting from the flow of the book. More advanced students of the health care economy who wish to be challenged further can utilize a comprehensive references section, with more than 750 sources, so that their (and our) work can be enriched through referral to the original sources.

What's Changed in the Third Edition?

It is critical that this textbook contain the most current knowledge and address the needs of our readers. As with the second edition, almost every chapter is revised to incorporate significant developments in the field.

In response to the instructors and students who use this book, we have moved the chapter on cost-benefit analysis forward, so that it is now chapter 4. We have made major changes in the treatment of insurance and managed care. Also in response to user demand, we have broken up a single health insurance chapter into two components. Insurance (chapter 7), which looks at the individual determinants of insurance, now precedes Consumer Choice (chapter 8), as well as a set of chapters on important, related economic topics. The Organization of Health Insurance Markets (chapter 11), which looks at the development of health insurance markets (and asks the question "who pays?"), precedes the entirely rewritten and greatly expanded chapter on Managed Care (chapter 12). In this chapter, we make a major effort to link theoretical models and empirical findings.

The section on governmental actions regarding the health economy has been reorganized. Chapter 20 looks at conceptual issues regarding government intervention in health care markets; chapter 21 investigates the principal regulatory mechanisms, including antitrust policy. These are followed by an updated chapter 22, which includes information about the 1997 changes to Medicare and Medicaid.

Finally, we finish the book with two new chapters. Chapter 25 looks at economic "bads." Economists like to look at things that are good for us, but some things such as cigarettes are not. Chapter 26 is an entirely new chapter on pharmaceuticals. Rather than a simple "industry study," we look at those portions of the pharmaceutical industry with particularly novel economic contents. These include questions as to the optimal combinations of drug therapies and other economic technologies, the appropriate amount of patent protection that an industry (in this case the pharmaceutical industry) should enjoy, and price discrimination by pharmaceutical firms (or why drugs are cheaper in Mexico than in the United States).

Another change involves the emergence of Internet resources for students and scholars. Tables and charts that were once available only in book form, and then only after several years, are now available much more quickly, and are often available on the Internet long before they are available (if at all) in print. The downside to this explosion of information involves editorial oversight (not all sources are good ones) and frustrating tendencies for Internet sites to disappear. We have chosen to focus on governmental sites such as the following for references that we believe to be both long lasting and reliable.

National Institutes of Health (...

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Table of Contents

PART I: Basic Economics Tools
Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 2: Microeconomic Tools for Health Economics
Chapter 3: Statistical Tools for Health Economics
Chapter 4: Economic Efficiency and Cost-Benefit Analysis
PART II: Supply and Demand
Chapter 5: Production of Health
Chapter 6: The Production, Cost, and Technology of Health Care
Chapter 7: Demand for Health Capital
Chapter 8: Demand and Supply of Health Insurance
Chapter 9: Consumer Choice and Demand
PART III: Information and Insurance Markets
Chapter 10: Asymmetric Information and Agency
Chapter 11: The Organization of Health Insurance Markets
Chapter 12: Managed Care
Chapter 13: Nonprofit Firms
PART IV: Key Players in the Health Care Sector
Chapter 14: Hospitals and Long-Term Care
Chapter 15: The Physician’s Practice
Chapter 16: Health Care Labor Markets and Professional Training
Chapter 17: The Pharmaceutical Industry
PART V: Social Insurance
Chapter 18: Equity, Efficiency, and Need
Chapter 19: Government Intervention in Health Care Markets
Chapter 20: Government Regulation: Principal Regulatory Mechanisms
Chapter 21: Social Insurance
Chapter 22: Comparative Health Care Systems
Chapter 23: Health System Reform
PART VI: Special Topics
Chapter 24: The Health Economics of Bads
Chapter 25: Epidemiology and Economics: HIV/AIDS in Africa
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Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

This is the third edition of a book that was conceived in 1990 and first published in 1993. To indicate how much the world of health economics has changed, the first edition made a single reference to "managed care," and that was in the context of monopoly power in the provision of health care. In addition, the debate on the Clinton health plan illuminated a large set of issues that invigorated the discipline of health economics.

This book was first written to assist health economics instructors in developing a clear, step-by-step understanding of health economics for their students. We also believe that it is important for instructors to show what health economics researchers are doing in theory and in empirical work. The book synthesizes contemporary developments around a set of basic economic principles, including maximization of consumer utility (or well-being) and economic profit, wishing to make these principles accessible to undergraduate students, as well as to graduate students. Rather than organizing the book around the institutions specific to the health care economy, we have used core economics themes as basic as supply and demand, as venerable as technology or labor issues, and as modern as the economics of information. Moreover, we have sought to improve accessibility to the book for the wide range of health services students and practitioners whose knowledge of economics may be more limited.

We have followed the philosophy that students must have a working knowledge of the analytical tools of economics and econometrics to appreciate the field of health economics. Some students may be ready to plunge directlyintoCost-Benefit Analysis (chapter 4) or The Production of Health (chapter 5) upon completion of the introductory chapter 1. However, chapters 2 (Microeconomic Tools) and 3 (Statistical Tools) allow the students and their teachers to develop or to review the needed analytical concepts before tackling the core subject matter. In chapters 2 and 3, students with as little as one semester of microeconomics may review and study how economists analyze problems, using examples that are relevant to health economics. No calculus is needed.

Consistent with an emphasis on clarity of exposition, this book makes extensive use of graphs, tables, and charts. Discussion questions and exercises are provided to help students master the basics and to prompt them to think about the issues. Features on up-to-date applications of theory and policy developments are also included, as well as the occasional tidbit containing purely background information.

Finally, we caution that some of the chapters, such as those on insurance, although devoid of advanced mathematics, may still require considerable effort. No painless way is available to appreciate the scope of the contributions that scholars have made in recent years. Sections or subsections that are more demanding and/or peripheral to the core material have been identified. These sections can be omitted without detracting from the flow of the book. More advanced students of the health care economy who wish to be challenged further can utilize a comprehensive references section, with more than 750 sources, so that their (and our) work can be enriched through referral to the original sources.

What's Changed in the Third Edition?

It is critical that this textbook contain the most current knowledge and address the needs of our readers. As with the second edition, almost every chapter is revised to incorporate significant developments in the field.

In response to the instructors and students who use this book, we have moved the chapter on cost-benefit analysis forward, so that it is now chapter 4. We have made major changes in the treatment of insurance and managed care. Also in response to user demand, we have broken up a single health insurance chapter into two components. Insurance (chapter 7), which looks at the individual determinants of insurance, now precedes Consumer Choice (chapter 8), as well as a set of chapters on important, related economic topics. The Organization of Health Insurance Markets (chapter 11), which looks at the development of health insurance markets (and asks the question "who pays?"), precedes the entirely rewritten and greatly expanded chapter on Managed Care (chapter 12). In this chapter, we make a major effort to link theoretical models and empirical findings.

The section on governmental actions regarding the health economy has been reorganized. Chapter 20 looks at conceptual issues regarding government intervention in health care markets; chapter 21 investigates the principal regulatory mechanisms, including antitrust policy. These are followed by an updated chapter 22, which includes information about the 1997 changes to Medicare and Medicaid.

Finally, we finish the book with two new chapters. Chapter 25 looks at economic "bads." Economists like to look at things that are good for us, but some things such as cigarettes are not. Chapter 26 is an entirely new chapter on pharmaceuticals. Rather than a simple "industry study," we look at those portions of the pharmaceutical industry with particularly novel economic contents. These include questions as to the optimal combinations of drug therapies and other economic technologies, the appropriate amount of patent protection that an industry (in this case the pharmaceutical industry) should enjoy, and price discrimination by pharmaceutical firms (or why drugs are cheaper in Mexico than in the United States).

Another change involves the emergence of Internet resources for students and scholars. Tables and charts that were once available only in book form, and then only after several years, are now available much more quickly, and are often available on the Internet long before they are available (if at all) in print. The downside to this explosion of information involves editorial oversight (not all sources are good ones) and frustrating tendencies for Internet sites to disappear. We have chosen to focus on governmental sites such as the following for references that we believe to be both long lasting and reliable.

National Institutes of Health (...

Read More Show Less

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