The Economics of Seasonal Cycles

Overview

Historically, economists sought to understand the economic significance of macro fluctuations associated with seasons. During the 1920s and 1930s, the focus shifted to business cycles, and seasonal fluctuations were treated as noise that could be removed from data before analysis. Jeffrey Miron seeks to reverse this trend, arguing that seasonal fluctuations have much to teach macroeconomists. He analyzes the economic forces that produce seasonality and discusses the lessons about economic behavior that result ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$41.32
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$45.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (10) from $20.17   
  • New (5) from $33.85   
  • Used (5) from $20.17   
Sending request ...

Overview

Historically, economists sought to understand the economic significance of macro fluctuations associated with seasons. During the 1920s and 1930s, the focus shifted to business cycles, and seasonal fluctuations were treated as noise that could be removed from data before analysis. Jeffrey Miron seeks to reverse this trend, arguing that seasonal fluctuations have much to teach macroeconomists. He analyzes the economic forces that produce seasonality and discusses the lessons about economic behavior that result from this analysis. Compared to existing work on seasonality, Miron's book focuses on economic rather than purely statistical issues, looking at which of the alternative statistical models of seasonality are plausible for economic variables, and asking why seasonal fluctuations in economic variables require special treatment relative to other kinds of fluctuations.Miron first addresses the question of why macroeconomists should be interested in seasonal as opposed to business cycle fluctuations. In Part I he identifies restrictions that are uniquely available for seasonal fluctuations; reviews evidence suggesting that seasonal and business cycle fluctuations are driven by similar economic propagation mechanisms; and shows that seasonal fluctuations raise many of the same questions for welfare and policy analysis as do business cycle fluctuations.In Part II, Miron provides a useful summary of results in the literature that analyzes specific examples of seasonal fluctuations to shed light on the nature of aggregate fluctuations in general. Topics covered include the production smoothing model of inventories, the relation between seasonal fluctuations in interest rates and the founding of the Federal Reserve, and the design of seasonal monetary policy.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262133234
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 8/13/1996
  • Pages: 242
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Figures
List of Tables
Acknowledgments
1 Introduction 1
2 Identifying Restrictions and Seasonal Fluctuations 7
3 Basic Facts about Seasonal Fluctuations 15
4 The Similarity of Seasonal Cycles and Business Cycles 57
5 Interactions between Seasonal Cycles and Business Cycles 73
6 Seasonal Fluctuations and the Production-Smoothing Model for Inventories 101
7 Financial Panics, the Seasonality of Nominal Interest Rates, and the Founding of the Fed 127
8 The Gold Standard and Interest Rate Seasonality 149
9 Seasonal Monetary Policy 173
10 Welfare Implications of Seasonal Cycles 195
Notes 203
References 211
Index 223
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)