EcoRedux: Design Remedies for an Ailing Planet (Architectural Design)

Overview

This issue of AD explores the remarkable resurgence of ecological strategies in architectural imagination. As a symptom of a new sociopolitical reality inundated with environmental catastrophes, sudden climatic changes, garbage-packed metropolises and para-economies of non-recyclable e-waste, environmental consciousness and the image of the earth re-emerges, after the 1960s, as an inevitable cultural armature for architects; now faced with the urgency to heal an ill-managed planet that is headed towards ...

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Overview

This issue of AD explores the remarkable resurgence of ecological strategies in architectural imagination. As a symptom of a new sociopolitical reality inundated with environmental catastrophes, sudden climatic changes, garbage-packed metropolises and para-economies of non-recyclable e-waste, environmental consciousness and the image of the earth re-emerges, after the 1960s, as an inevitable cultural armature for architects; now faced with the urgency to heal an ill-managed planet that is headed towards evolutionary bankruptcy. At present though, in a world that has suffered severe loss of resources, the new wave of ecological architecture is not solely directed to the ethics of the world's salvation, yet rather upraises as a psycho-spatial or mental position, fuelling a reality of change, motion and action. Coined as ‘EcoRedux', this position differs from utopia in that it does not explicitly seek to be right; it recognises pollution and waste as generative potentials for design. In this sense, projects that may appear at first sight as science-fictional are not part of a foreign sphere, unassociated with the real, but an extrusion of our own realms and operations.

  • Contributors include: Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), Fabiola López-Durán and Nikki Moore, Anthony Vidler and Mark Wigley.
  • Featured architects: Anna Pla Catalá, Jonathan Enns, Eva Franch-Gilabert. Mitchell Joachim (Terreform One), François Roche (R&Sie(n)), Rafi Segal, Alexandros Tsamis and Eric Vergne.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470746622
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 1/18/2011
  • Series: Architectural Design Series, #40
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 136
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Lydia Kallipoliti is a practising architect and a writer,currently teaching as an assistant professor adjunct at the CooperUnion school of architecture in New York. She holds a Diploma inArchitecture and Engineering from the Aristotle University ofThessaloniki (AUTh) in Greece, a SMArchS from MIT and an MA fromPrinceton University, and is completing her PhD at Princeton onrecycling material experiments and the intersection of cyberneticand ecological theories in the postwar period.
Her design work has received awards in several internationalarchitectural competitions, and has been exhibited at venuesincluding the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), theBiennial Miami+ Beach, the Venice Biennale, the Byzantine Museum ofAthens, the Biennale of Young Greek Architects, the 5th NationalExhibition of Greek Architectural Work and the 'Non-StandardPraxis' digital design conference. Her theoretical work has beenpublished widely in Log, Thresholds, 306090, ArcPlus, Pidgin,Future Anterior, The Cornell Journal of Architecture andRoutledge's Urbanism Reader, and presented in lecturesinternationally. She is the recipient of awards including theWoodrow Wilson Fellowship, the Lawrence Anderson award for thecreative documentation of architectural history, the High MeadowsSustainability Fund, the Marvin E Goody award for excellence in thecreative use of materials and a Fulbright scholarship.
This issue of AD is part of a larger research project thatKallipoliti designed and curated. ‘EcoRedux' is also anexhibition installation which was hosted at the Byzantine Museum ofAthens, at Columbia University and at the Cooper Union in New York,and is forthcoming with 1/1 prototype installations at the DesignHub of Barcelona in March 2011. ‘EcoRedux' is accompanied byan online non-profit educational resource for ecologicalexperiments in the 1960s and 1970s and their potential creativereuse in contemporary design culture (www.ecoredux.com). Thewebsite received an honour at the 14th International Webby Awardsof 2010. As an open-source database, EcoRedux online has a dualfunction: first, to explore the history of the period in assemblinga genealogical archive and second, to reuse the archive as agenerative device for design. Given the open-source nature of theproject, architects and designers are able to actively participatein the expansion of the website by submitting for upload their owninterpretations of ecological experiments that are documented inthe archive. EcoRedux is an expanding, growing resource: awikipedia for designers to expand their knowledge and trigger newecological projects.
Special thanks to Laura Serejo Genes for her invaluableorganisation assistance in editing this issue.

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Table of Contents

Editorial (Helen Castle).

About the Guest-Editor (Lydia Kallipoliti).

Spotlight: Visual highlights of the issue.

Introduction: No More Schisms (Lydia Kallipoliti).

Whatever Happened to Ecology? (John McHale and the BuckyFuller Revival Anthony Vidler).

The Soft Cosmos of AD's 'Cosmorama' in the 1960s and 1970s(Lydia Kallipoliti).

Guest-editor Lydia Kallipoliti revives the seminal AD Cosmoramasection with a 'soft cosmos': a genealogy of ecological materialexperimentation from the 1960s and 1970s.

(Ut)opiates: Rethinking Nature (Fabiola López-Duránand Nikki Moore).

The Architecture of the Mouse (Mark Wigley).

MEtreePOLIS 1901-2111 (Matthias Hollwich and MarcKushner).

(Science) Fiction, Ecosophical Apparatus and Skizoid Machines:Animism, Vitalism and Machinism as a Way to Rearticulate the Needto Confront the Unknown in a Contradictory Manner (FrançoisRoche).

Ecologies of Excess: An Excerpt from a 22nd-Century ArchitectureHistory Class (Eva Franch i Gilabert).

Projecting herself into the 22nd century, Eva Franch i Gilabertasks what would happen if culture was predicated on ecologies ofexcess.

Go Brown: Inner-Disciplinary Conjectures (AlexandrosTsamis).

Numerical Ecosystems (Anna Pla Catalá).

Dystopian Farming (Eric Vergne).

Dross City (Lydia Kallipoliti).

A Well-Cultivated House (Rafi Segal).

Intelligent Wood Assemblies: Incorporating Found Geometry andNatural Material Complexity (Jonathan Enns).

Rapid Re(f)use: 3-D Fabricated Positive Waste Ecologies(Mitchell Joachim).

Counterpoint: Comings and Goings (Brian Carter).

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