Ecstasy

Ecstasy

4.8 5
by Avant
     
 

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Chances are that if you like Avant, it's because you're a big R. Kelly fan. Picking up where Avant left off on his sleeper hit debut, Ecstasy finds the Cleveland-born, Chicago-groomed crooner continuing to make bump-'n'-grind R&B in the tradition of his Windy City peer. For example, the boudoir ballad "MakinSee more details below

Overview

Chances are that if you like Avant, it's because you're a big R. Kelly fan. Picking up where Avant left off on his sleeper hit debut, Ecstasy finds the Cleveland-born, Chicago-groomed crooner continuing to make bump-'n'-grind R&B in the tradition of his Windy City peer. For example, the boudoir ballad "Makin' Good Love" sounds like a cross between Kelly's "When a Woman's Fed Up" and "It Seems like You're Ready," and the Cristal-splashed party anthem "What Do You Want" is a carbon copy of Kelly's "Fiesta" remix, right down to the Latin vibe and Jay-Z-like rap solo (Avant even mimics R&B bad boy Bobby Brown on the "I know I did you wrong" ballad "Sorry"). While imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Avant would benefit from further developing his own signature sound. What he lacks in originality, however, he certainly compensates for by accurately capturing the gospel- and blues-informed soul style that's made Kelly a household name.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Alex Henderson
Creatively, Avant's sophomore album, Ecstasy, is a step forward for the Cleveland-based urban contemporary singer. This 2002 release isn't perfect -- some of the tracks are routine and pedestrian. But Ecstasy contains more gems than My Thoughts, Avant's competent, if uneven, debut album of 2000. Some things haven't changed; Ecstasy, like My Thoughts, was produced by Steve "Stone" Huff and Avant still brings a strong R. Kelly influence to the table, which means that listeners are also hearing a strong Ronald Isley influence. (Ronald Isley, lead singer of the Isley Brothers, is among Kelly's primary influences.) Ecstasy is hardly a radical departure from My Thoughts; the main difference between the two albums is that this time Avant usually has stronger material to work with. The Midwesterner really soars on the bluesy "You Ain't Right" and he is equally impressive on the moody "One Way Street" (a duet with the Gap Band's Charlie Wilson). Also quite memorable is "Six in da Morning," which should not be confused with Ice-T's 1986 gangsta rap classic but is a funky, hip-hop-minded jam along the lines of Kelly's "Fiesta." Showing his flexibility, Avant demonstrates that he is as comfortable with hip-hop-friendly funk as he is with romantic ballads and slow jams. Again, Ecstasy (which lists basketball icon Magic Johnson as one of its executive producers) isn't without its share of generic filler, but the CD doesn't have as much of it as My Thoughts -- and for every minus that you can find on this release, there are three or four pluses. If you had to choose between Ecstasy and My Thoughts, this album would be a better investment.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/26/2002
Label:
Mca
UPC:
0008811280925
Rank:
54407

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