Eddie: Harold's Little Brother

Eddie: Harold's Little Brother

by Pat Koch Thaler, Edward T. T. Koch, James Warhola, Pat Koch Thaler
     
 

The former mayor of New York City learns that his talent for talking can take him far!

No matter how much Eddie practices, he just can't play baseball like his big brother, Harold. In fact, there's only one part of the game Eddie's any good at, and it has nothing to do with double plays or home runs -- Eddie's great at talking, and gives a fantastic

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Overview

The former mayor of New York City learns that his talent for talking can take him far!

No matter how much Eddie practices, he just can't play baseball like his big brother, Harold. In fact, there's only one part of the game Eddie's any good at, and it has nothing to do with double plays or home runs -- Eddie's great at talking, and gives a fantastic game wrap-up. Fortunately for Eddie, Harold helps him see just how talented he really is and starts him on an amazing career!

James Warhola's richly-detailed artwork, full of wit and wonderful period details, brings the Koch brothers to life.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
In his first book for children, former New York City mayor Koch teams up with his sister for a heartfelt autobiographical tale introducing their older brother, an athlete who excelled in all sports. "Eddie wanted to be like Harold," but Eddie's attempts to keep up on the baseball field fail miserably. When the other kids clamor to have Harold on their team, he initially insists, "If you want me, you have to let Eddie play too." But Harold eventually discourages Eddie from joining in, suggesting instead that they think of something he is good at and really loves. "Well,... I may not be good at sports, but I like to talk," Eddie says. The boy uses his talent to provide Harold and his teammates with spirited play-by-play wrap-ups of their games and, with practice, to win the school public speaking contest. The closing scene finds Harold listening to Mayor Koch making a speech; he answers Koch's signature "How am I doing?" with a "You're doing great!" The authors shape a satisfying sentimental story with an uplifting message. Warhola creates an engagingly scrappy group of youths in animated illustrations. His 1930s cityscapes contribute to a sense of an idyllic childhood, while honest depictions of the kids' facial expressions-first chagrined to play ball with Eddie, and later regaled by his play-by-play recaps-will be recognizable to contemporary readers. Ages 5-up. (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Eddie's older brother is a star in baseball, basketball, and football; as hard as the younger boy tries, he can never measure up to him. Eddie loves telling the neighborhood kids about Harold's exploits, though, and this leads to his eventual realization of his true talents. Set in a big city in the days of knickers and hand-pushed ice-cream carts, this story has a nostalgic charm, yet lacks the emotional complexity that marks the lives of real children. Unlike the fictional Eddie, most youngsters would probably feel at least occasionally envious of Harold. And some of the dialogue doesn't ring true; for instance, Harold tells his brother, "Let's try to think of something you do well and really love." The skillfully done watercolors add a lot of atmosphere and humor, especially when showing Eddie's mishaps playing baseball. Based on childhood memories of the authors, the former mayor of New York City and his sister, this book is recommended for larger collections or where local interest warrants purchase.-Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Imagine Ed Koch playing baseball. If the former New York City mayor had his way, he might have pursued a career in professional sports. But as this picture book reveals, Koch needed a little help recognizing his true calling. As a child, young Eddie wants to play baseball like his talented older brother, Harold. But unlike Harold, and despite his best efforts, Eddie's no natural. He does, however, have a gift for gab. After each game he recaps the action in vivid detail. Harold encourages Eddie to draw on his strengths by entering a public-speaking contest. Though the story wraps up a little too neatly-Eddie grows up to be a lawyer, then the mayor of New York City-its message is clear and important: everyone has different talents and natural abilities, and finding what we are good at, and pursuing it, is the path to success. Warhola's sepia-rich watercolors, reflecting the look and feel of Depression-era New York, are the perfect accompaniment. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399242106
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/09/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.22(w) x 10.48(h) x 0.46(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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