Eddie's Bastard

( 11 )

Overview

"Eddie's Bastard" is William Amos Mann IV, known as Billy — the son of a heroic pilot killed in Vietnam and an unknown woman. The last in a line of proud, individualistic Irish-American men, Billy is discovered in a basket at the door of the dilapidated mansion where his bitter, hard-drinking grandfather, Thomas Mann, has exiled himself. Astonished and moved by the arrival of his unexpected progeny, Thomas sets out to raise the boy himself — on a diet of love, fried baloney, and the fascinating lore of their shared heritage. Listening to his sets ...

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Eddie's Bastard

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Overview

"Eddie's Bastard" is William Amos Mann IV, known as Billy — the son of a heroic pilot killed in Vietnam and an unknown woman. The last in a line of proud, individualistic Irish-American men, Billy is discovered in a basket at the door of the dilapidated mansion where his bitter, hard-drinking grandfather, Thomas Mann, has exiled himself. Astonished and moved by the arrival of his unexpected progeny, Thomas sets out to raise the boy himself — on a diet of love, fried baloney, and the fascinating lore of their shared heritage. Listening to his sets out to capture the stories on paper. He is a Mann, Grandpa reminds him daily, and thus destined for greatness.

Through the tales of his ancestors, his own experiences, and the unforgettable characters who enhance and enliven his adolescence, Billy learns of bravery and cowardice, of life and death, of the heart's capacity for love and for unremitting hatred, eventually grasping the meaning of family and history and their power to shape destiny. Steeped in imagery and threaded with lyricism, Eddie's Bastard is a novel of discovery, of a young man's emergence into the world, and the endless possibilities it offers.

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Editorial Reviews

Emily Burns
The bastard of the title is Billy Mann, left by his mother in a basket on the doorstep of his paternal grandfather. Eddie has just been killed in Vietnam, and Billy is raised by the grandfather, who spends most of his time killing his own pain with whiskey. Though coming-of-age-in-a-dysfunctional-family stories are a dime a dozen, this first novel by twenty-eight-year-old Kowalski never descends into maudlin self-pity, and the plot, though complex, never becomes overly convoluted.

Billy is a likable boy, and his grandfather is an appealing character. The supporting characters are all flawed, some irredeemably, and even the more interesting and pleasant ones, such as Billy’s childhood friend Annie and the town’s doctor, harbor secrets. As the narrative progresses and the tales of redemption develop, Kowalski never lets his story become heavy-handed and his characters remain real as they attempt to solve their problems. Billy’s descriptions of his adolescence are pleasantly understated.

Arizona Daily Star
Eddie's Bastard is a contemporary generational novel that deserves a listen. It is given an appealing, professional read by veteran Campbell Scott. . .
Dallas Morning News
This thoughtful distillation of the meaning of familial relationships is rich in pathos and humor, most impressively conveyed through the able reading by Campbell Scott.
Gail Godwin
A grand debut. Eddie's Bastard is a beguiling blend of narrative con brio, human-heartedness, and zany surprises.
Carol J. Bissett
Billy Mann is an illegitimate orphan known around Mannville as 'Eddie's Bastard.' This first novel tells the story of two relationships: between Billy and the reclusive grandfather who reared him and Billy and his young friend Annie, a victim of parental abuse. These relationships are troubled in the extreme, but love can abound even in the most imperfect settings. The theme of family gives form to the novel. Stories of his father, Eddie (dead before his birth, inspire Billy like ghostly encouragement, and excerpts from his great-grandfather's diary appear like a refrain, offering guidance. Kowalski writes in a style so natural that the reader is only aware of the story it transports. Surreal moments that recall John Irving include a man's severed tongue inside a snowball and a description of the family's financial ruin by the 'Fiasco of Ostriches.' Highly recommended for all collections.
Denver Post
Seldom does a first novel come along that is as elegantly written and tells such a charming and engrossing story as Eddie's Bastard. William Kowalski has created a touching tale with characters so real and endearing that you rejoice in their victories over life and suffer with them in their defeats.It's a coming-of-age story of a family and its past as well as its present, its triumphs and travails. Most of all, though, it's the story of William Amos Mann IV, who truly is Eddie's illegitimate son, and how he becomes both a man and a Mann. Kowalski tells Billy's, and the rest of the Manns', story in polished and poignant prose that offers a talent beyond his 28 years.Abandoned at birth by a mother he doesn't know, Billy is raised by his eccentric and often-drunk grandfather, Thomas. Thomas is a benign drunk who spends his days with Billy holed up in the old Mann house, which has aged past its former splendor. The Manns were once rulers of the roost in Mannville, the family's namesake town on the banks of Lake Erie.When Grandpa's son and town hero Eddie was shot down in his fighter plane during the Vietnam War, Grandpa thinks the Mann name will die with him. So he is more than happy to raise the infant he finds on his doorstep in 1970, since, "There was no doubt in Grandpa's mind about whose son I was. I had the same eyes as my father, and Grandpa recognized them immediately.''Grandpa is a born storyteller and the Mann history is rich with tales, mostly centering on Willie, who returns from the Civil War a reluctant hero, then finds a long-buried treasure, making the family wealthy. Willie also leaves a diary that provides answers to many questions better left unasked.As Billy growsup sequestered in the Mann mansion with Grandpa, he learns independence and develops an abiding hunger for information about his father and mother. He also decides early on that he wants to be a writer, and even writes a short story that is included in the book.It's this aspect of the story that is drawing comparisons with John Irving. But not so fast. Where Irving has a propensity for going over the top with his writing, using stories within stories to offer hyperbole and grandiosity, Kowalski keeps his - and Billy's - emotions reined in, even when he talks of ghosts, reincarnation and things that go bump in the night.Billy's world is filled with a discordant array of characters. There's his lifelong love, Annie Simpson, who, with Billy's help, escapes a miserable and terrifying childhood. There's Dr. Connor, the old family friend who dotes on Billy and who has a secret of his own. There's Elsie, who has a thing for young men, and teaches Billy the facts of life. He's befriended by the kindly Shumacher family, with whom he stays while Grandpa is recovering from an injury.Eddie's Bastard is a rich kaleidoscope of a tale that draws the reader in from the get-go and refuses to relinquish its hold. Most of all, it's a family's story told with warmth and humility, rich with imagination and grit.
Baltimore Sun
For readers who enjoy the eccentric and rambling family narratives of John Irving, Eddie's Bastard by William Kowalski is a first novel that deserves attention. Kowalski lacks Irving's comic timing and fanciful imagination, but he has a sharp eye for the details of family life in rural America and a good understanding of character.The bastard of the title is young Billy Mann, whose father dies in Vietnam and whose mother is unknown. With the help of the grandfather who raises him, Billy tries to reconstruct a family history that is as tangled as it is bizarre. But what he discovers about his past is not nearly as important as the guidance that he receives each day from the grandfather who teaches him how to love.
San Antonio Express News
A rich and readable family history, filled with tales of wars, stolen treasure, hauntings, family fiascoes and, most of all, a young man's self-discovery...Kowalski is a gifted storyteller who deserves a following.
Brooklyn Bridge Magazine
This is a big old-fashioned book in every possible way...often funny, at times aching—a fine beginning to launch a novelist.
New York Times Book Review
Exhuberant...Kowalski is a talented stylist.
Los Angeles Times
There's a honeyed glow to Eddie's Bastard, which...avoids sentimentality in this tale about the truth and consequences of knowing who you are.
London Times
Vividly impressionistic prose.
People
The 28 year-old author gives his first novel an appealing Dickensian flavor.
Tulsa World
A mesmerizing debut...skillfully crafted and highly imaginative.
America Magazine
A notable literary debut...Here's one satisfying novel by a writer of great promise.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In his ambitious, bittersweet first novel, Kowalski explores the world of a boy growing up in a small upstate New York town called Mannsville who must find his place in the shadows of nearly mythic ancestors. In infancy, narrator Billy Mann was left on his grandfather's doorstep, with a note identifying him only as "Eddie's bastard." Billy's bitter, proud and often drunk grandfather tells him that Eddie was a larger-than-life hero whose plane was shot down over Vietnam. Growing up, Billy is regaled with tales of other legendary Manns, whose "natural tendency toward greatness" stretches back more than a century. Yet the grandfather also paints himself as a fool who lost the family fortune with an ill-conceived idea for an ostrich farm. Billy endures a lonely, isolated childhood and adolescence, countered primarily by his rich imagination, his courage and his friendship with neighbor Annie Simpson, whose abusive, poor white trash family is the antithesis of the lineage-proud Manns. Kowalski layers the past effectively, blending the grandfather's oral history with Billy's own coming-of-age narrative. Although the vaunted Mann fortune derives from simple luck--the discovery of blood-tainted, Civil War-era buried treasure on their property--the mythic tales inspire Billy to some noble deeds of his own, and he assumes the mantle of family storyteller so the legends will endure. Though at times it veers into dramatic overload, the novel is ultimately an absorbing, redemptive exploration of a young man's search for himself, wresting an identity out of generations of secrets. Agent, Anne Hawkins of John Hawkins & Assoc. 75,000 first printing; major ad/promo; author tour; rights sold in Germany, England, Spain and the Netherlands; Harper audio. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Billy Mann is an illegitimate orphan known around Mannville as Eddie's Bastard. This first novel tells the story of two relationships: between Billy and the reclusive grandfather who reared him and Billy and his young friend Annie, a victim of paternal abuse. These relationships are troubled in the extreme, but love can abound in even the most imperfect settings. The theme of family gives form to the novel. Stories of his father, Eddie (dead before his birth), inspire Billy like ghostly encouragement, and excerpts from his great-grandfather's diary appear like a refrain, offering guidance. Kowalski writes in a style so natural that the reader is only aware of the story it transports. Surreal moments that recall John Irving include a man's severed tongue inside a snowball and a description of the family's financial ruin by the "Fiasco of Ostriches." Highly recommended for all collections.--Carol J. Bissett, Dittlinger Memorial Lib., New Braunfels, TX Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Wendy Brandmark
William Kowalski's first novel shows all the ambition, enthusiasm and idealism which a young author gives to his first literary child. He does not convince us that the Manns are special or universal, although we are told over and over again that we should regard them as such. Perhaps there have been too many heroes searching for buried truths and forgotten treasure. But the ending of this saga is left refreshingly open; Kowalski resists a happy resolution with the Manns and Simpsons united through Billy and Annie, and leaves unanswered most of Billy's questions about his mother. Billy's voice rarely falters...Like Billy and his grandfather, Kowalski is a natural storyteller, but he needs to be more critical with his work.
The (London) Times Literary Supplement
Kirkus Reviews
Newcomer Kowalski pens an entertaining John Irving soufflé: a coming-of-age tale about a boy who becomes a novelist, having written a symbolic short story that he includes in a novel about a young boy coming of age. In August 1970, the baby William Mann is silently deposited on the porch of Grandpa Thomas Mann, Jr., the last patriarch of the once-wealthy founder family of Mannville, New York. Grandpa might have stepped on the child had not an F-4 fighter jet streamed overhead just in time—a pleasant Garpish touch. Like Garp's father, William's was a pilot, shot down a few months before in Vietnam. Grandpa Thomas raises the boy in a house full of ghosts and stories, including the one about the lost diary written by Civil War veteran Willie Mann. (Could it contain shameful secrets?) Across the way live the Simpsons, archenemies of the Manns, and their daughter Annie, with whom young Willie falls in love. A good Garp reproduction will feature an oracular woman who is scarred by sexual abuse, and Annie Simpson performs the role here, having been systematically raped by her father throughout her girlhood. She flees alone to Montreal, where she becomes—here, the proper Irvingite will, with Willie, sigh for the loss—a lesbian. But "maybe leaving her alone was the best thing. So I focused my energy anew on finding my mother." With the encouragement of Dr. Connor, Willie's authorial talent is nurtured, while all the loose strands in the story—the key to the Mann's early fortune, the Simpson family curse, the identity of his mother, and the contents of Willie's diary—come shudderingly together at nothing less than Grandpa's funeral. Knock-off models are bestenjoyed when the original is kept from view, and though its merrily familiar plot can make this somewhat difficult, Kowalski's version will get you from A to B better than most. (First printing of $75,000)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061098253
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/1/2000
  • Series: Harper Perennial
  • Edition description: 1ST PERENN
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 966,312
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.87 (d)

Meet the Author

William Kowalski is the author of Eddie's Bastard, Somewhere South of Here, and The Adventures of Flash Jackson. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1970 and raised in Erie, Pennsylvania. He lives in Nova Scotia with his wife and daughter.

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Read an Excerpt

Eddie's Bastard
I Am Born; Grandpa Discovers Me, and
I Am Named; I Learn to Read; the Ghosts; I Encounter Annie Simpson


I arrived in this world the way most bastards do—by surprise. That's the only fact about myself that I knew at the beginning of my life. At the very beginning, of course, I knew nothing. Babies are born with minds as blank as brand-new notebooks, just waiting to be written in, and I was no exception. Later, as I grew older and learned things—as the pages of the notebook, so to speak, became filled up—I began to make certain connections, and thus I discovered that among children I was unusual. Where others had a mother, I had none; father, same; birth certificate, none; name, unknown. And as soon as I was old enough to understand that babies didn't just appear from midair, I understood that my arrival was not just a mystery to myself. It was a strange occurrence to everyone who knew me.
Nobody seemed to know where I was born, or exactly when, or to whom. Nor did anyone know where I was conceived. How, of course, was obvious. Contrary to my earliest notions, babies don't just appear, though in my case this seemed entirely possible. Somewhere, sometime, my father had sex with my mother, and here I am.
In the space for mother, then, there is nothing but a blank.
I know who my father is—or was, rather. He was Eddie Mann, Lieutenant, USAF (dec.). The dec. stands for deceased. At one time, I had my own suspicions of who my mother was, and so did everyone else who knew me. They were all vague and unprovable, however, and suspicions are best left to the tabloids, which I read sometimes while waiting in line at thesupermarket.
I confess to a weakness for tabloids; they stimulate my imagination, get me to thinking that perhaps the impossible is not so far removed as we might think. My favorite articles are the ones about Bat Boy, half human child and half bat, which someone claims to have found in a cave somewhere in the South. I sympathize with Bat Boy, even though I don't believe in him. I imagine myself having lengthy conversations with him, teaching him how to play baseball, being his friend. Like me, his appearance was unexpected, and nobody seems to know quite what to do with him.
My imagination—the part of my mind that allows me to believe in Bat Boy—also stretches back to the time before I was born, and before. I see my mother, a pregnant young girl, panicked but with a strong conscience, and some desire to see me succeed in life. She gives birth to me in secret somewhere: a train station, a taxi, under a tree in the middle of the forest. Then, after I'm born, she—a princess, a faerie queen, Amelia Earhart—deposits me on the back steps of the ancestral Mann home in Mannville, New York, where my father had been born and raised—as had his father, and his father before him. This is where my imagination is relieved of duty and the facts take over. This part of the story really happened.
It was the third of August, 1970. My grandfather, the herbalist and failed entrepreneur Thomas Mann Junior (no relation to the writer of the same name), who lived alone and abandoned in the farmhouse, found me there. Like some character in a Dickens novel, I'd been wrapped in a blanket and placed inside a picnic basket. Many years later, I was to discover that Grandpa had saved the picnic basket, a deed for which I've always been profoundly grateful. For years, it was my greatest treasure. It was the one thing in the world I was sure my mother had touched.
It was just after dawn, and the day was Grandpa's birthday. Grandpa celebrated his birthday the same way he celebrated every other day: he drank whiskey, sitting alone at the scarred and ancient kitchen table. He drank whiskey in the morning, drank it for his lunch, drank before dinner, and drank after dinner. Sometimes he didn't bother to eat dinner at all. Eating sobered him up, and that was unpleasant; he preferred to be drunk. But today there was something unusual going on, something to break the monotony of his drunkenness. It was my crying. Grandpa heard it dimly, out of the corner of his ear, as it were. It sounded familiar. It was a noise he'd heard before, but he couldn't quite place it.
"Chickens," he said to himself. I know he said this because later he was to tell me the whole story over and over again. There were no chickens left on our farm anymore and hadn't been for years, but sometimes he forgot this. Grandpa, when drunk, remembered better days, when chickens on the farm meant prosperity and things going right. In those days the farm was still operating, the crops were still growing, my father was still just a baby, the Ostriches had yet to wreak their havoc upon our future, and chickens roamed free. In Grandpa's sodden and inebriated mind, chickens meant hope, and they had to be protected.
So he interrupted his drinking. He stepped out the kitchen door to see if there were foxes in the chicken coop, which, though long de-serted, still stood. Instead of foxes, however, he found me.
Years afterward, Grandpa told me he'd nearly stepped on me as he came out the door. The sudden roar of a military jet overhead had caused him to stop his foot in midair as he looked up. It saved my life.
"Thank God for that jet," Grandpa said, "or I would have squashed you like the little bug you were."
It was the year the polluted Cuyahoga River burst into flames and burned for three days. The nation, divided by Vietnam, was united in its horror at the alchemic spectacle of flaming water; the beginning of my life coincided with a growing awareness that the world was polluted and dying, and that it was our own fault. I've always considered that event an omen of my birth.Eddie's Bastard. Copyright (c) by William Kowalski . Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

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Table of Contents

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Reading Group Guide

Plot Summary
"My life has been made of stories from beginning to end," reflects Billy Mann. "And just when it seems one is ending, a new one begins. The world itself is woven of stories, each man and woman and child of us threading our own brightly colored tale into the bigger story that was already being told as we were born and that will continue to be woven by others long after our threads have run out."

So, too, is the novel, Eddie's Bastard made from stories, beginning to end. And these stories, told and retold to Billy Mann by his irascible grandfather, form the basis of the boy's education as he discovers what it's like to be a man -- and a Mann.

Whether he's hearing the circumstances of his own birth, or reading tidbits of philosophy and pioneer wisdom in his ancestor's diary, Billy is surrounded by tales of adventure, bravery, misfortune, friendship, feuds, greed, and death. For Billy, these stories transform an existence that is often difficult and painful: orphaned at birth, left in a basket on his reclusive grandfather's doorstep; made to fend for himself when his alcoholic guardian was too drunk to care for him; subject to his grandfather's fits of rage and gloom. At a relatively young age, Billy witnesses child abuse, death, poverty, and sex. It is not surprising that he will grow up to be a writer, he himself a teller of stories.

But Billy's world is also filled with wonder and freedom. Guided by his grandfather's unconventional views on caring for children, Billy is left to explore the world around him: the dilapidated farmhouse and its overgrown yard, the fields and farms beyond it, the town of Mannville, where hisgrandfather seldom ventures. Through his own experiences, Billy learns many of life's lessons. But it is his grandfather's perspective, his certainty that the Mann family is both indomitable and tragic, which most informs Billy's coming-of-age. Billy's awareness of his legacy gives him the courage to stand up to the school bully, to teach himself to drive a motorcycle, to take on his friend Annie's wretched father, and to remain her friend, even through the most strenuous of times.

The details of life take on a larger meaning when they are framed as stories. It is easier to accept, if not understand, life's hardships when they are viewed through the prism of a story. It becomes easier to explain one's own choices when they are presented in the form of a story. Without stories, Billy Mann might have been somewhat less optimistic about the path his own life has taken. But what else do the stories offer? For Billy and for his grandfather, they are a way of keeping the Mann family alive. For, as his grandfather's life aptly demonstrates, money and fortune are fleeting. But families -- and the history they create -- endure forever.

Questions for Discussion
  • Billy's grandfather says, "Knowing the kind of people you come from is just as important as knowing yourself. In fact you can't know yourself if you don't know your people." Do you agree with this statement? How and what do we learn from our ancestors' actions and lives? Does information make us feel our limitations as well?
  • After his first terrifying confrontation with Annie's father, Billy realizes that he "had caught a glimpse of how the world could be sometimes and . . . that sight is horrifying to children." Discuss the impact that realizing the cruelty of Annie's father and the condition of her brother would have on a boy like Billy. Can you remember your first confrontation with life's cruel realities? What impact did it have on you?
  • What do you think of Billy's relationship with Elsie Orfenbacher? Do you think a boy can learn valuable lessons from uncommitted sex with an older woman? Should Elsie have put a stop to their relationship? What do you think Elsie teaches Billy about love and women?
  • Accompanying his grandfather to the home of an Amish family, Billy witnesses the traumatic birth of a baby and the death of its mother. Why do you think Billy's grandfather wants him to see this painful event? What does it teach Billy?
  • Discuss the character of Annie. Are you surprised at how Kowalski chose to develop her character? What does her lesbianism teach Billy? How would their relationship have changed if it had developed romantically?
  • What do you think of the way Billy is raised by his grandfather? How do you think Billy's character is shaped by his grandfather's alcoholism, his isolation from the community, and his "hands-off" style of parenting? Would Billy have been better off in a more traditional-style family, such as the Grubers? Why or why not?
  • Do you think Billy will go in search of his mother? Why do you think Kowalski chose not to pursue this aspect of Billy's story?
  • What is the effect of including Billy's novel within this work of fiction? What does it tell you about Billy? What did you learn about the process of writing from Billy's own experience?
  • Eddie's Bastard is filled with other examples of stories-within-a-story: Grandpa's experience in the war; Willie Mann's diary; the story of Billy's father, Eddie. To what end does Kowalski employ this technique? Is it effective?
  • In his diary, Billy's ancestor wrote that Americans "have practically no history. . . . We have only our present, which we are continually creating and recreating." These words were written centuries ago -- do you believe they are true today? How are Americans at an historical disadvantage -- or advantage -- because of the relative newness of their country?
  • As a group, discuss stories that have been passed down between generations in each of your families. What kinds of stories are they? Is their purpose to teach or to entertain-or both?
  • How does Eddie's Bastard compare with other coming-of-age stories you have read? How and why is it different?
Reading Group Guides come in packs of 20 and are available free of charge from your local bookstore or by calling 1-800-242-7737.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 11 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2005

    A Real Treasure

    I devoured this book. I was completely sucked in from the first paragraph. This is an engaging tale of coming to age. Like other's, the title almost caused me to miss out on this extraordinary novel, but you can't judge a book by its cover and this one is certainly worth a second look. Much more upbeat than I was expecting given the supject matter. I am going to recommend this novel to my book club for certain! I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2001

    Thoroughly entertaining.

    This was definitely one of those books that you want to read from cover to cover in one sitting. You are immediately drawn into the story without a dull moment ahead. An amazing read. Very John Irvingesque.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2000

    Absorbing!

    I was hesitant in reading this book because of its title, but I'm glad I went against my instinct because it turned to be one of the best books I've read in years. Kowalski's writing style was so free-flowing that I did not feel I was actually reading the book but rather living out the story myself. The characters were so vividly described and the storyline was so intense and interesting that I was immensely absorbed into the story. All emotions one can ever possess are touched by this book. Phenomenal! Read it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 23, 2011

    A good read

    I enjoyed this book because of it's simplicity. For baby boomers it will trigger reflective moments in our lifetime. I loved this book just because it wasn't political or mysterious. It was just a lovely read that will bring laughter and tears. There is a sequel as well. After reading this, I quickly found Kowalski's sequel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2000

    A Truly Moving Experience

    Most reviews relate to the story, which is important, but the author himself is in here too. What a gifted writer he is to enable me to go on this journey with Billy and his family. I read the story from beginning to end without once putting it down. I was caught by the essence, the depth, and the love all through the story. This was a story written with love and compassion, understanding, and wit. I admire Mr. Kowalski's literary ability but also the person he must surely be to have written such a beautiful novel. The moment I finished, I had tears in my eyes and exclaimed, 'how wonderful'. I feel gifted to have been able to read this poignant story and cannot wait for the next one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2000

    Don't Let the Title Keep You From This Book!

    Eddie's Bastard, just finished listening to it on audio. I could hardly wait to get in the car to hear more. Eddie became a real hero to me while 'reading' his story. I am sad to finish and leave the characters who each became so real. Annie just has to come back in a sequel. When will it be published?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2000

    Willie Mann: Bastard Hero

    If you are unsure wether to buy this 'first novel' by William Kowalski, don't be afraid. It is entertaining, insightful, and hilarious when it wants to be.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2000

    Thoroughly Enjoyable

    This first novel by William Kowalski covers all the aspects of growing up in a most unique way. I cared about the characters even with their quirks and imperfections. The retrospective style allows for editorial comments that add insight into the future, humor and interest. Eddie's Bastard is warm, funny and bittersweet and I can't wait until someone else I know reads it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 1999

    A wonderful, inspiring story!

    The first words out of my mouth when I finished Were 'what a great book!' William Kolowski proves to be a master storyteller in this inspiring and thought provoking first book. I'm allready looking forward to his next novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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