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Eden
     

Eden

by Emily Grosholz
 

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In her third book of poetry, Groholz brings together 40 lyric, narrative, and epistolary poems that trace a pilgrimage from the Eden of childhood through alienation and loss to an earthly paradise regained as the poet establishes her own family and a new sense of the purposes of her art. (Poetry)

Overview

In her third book of poetry, Groholz brings together 40 lyric, narrative, and epistolary poems that trace a pilgrimage from the Eden of childhood through alienation and loss to an earthly paradise regained as the poet establishes her own family and a new sense of the purposes of her art. (Poetry)

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Several different Edens come to light in this cycle of well-crafted and generally felicitous poems. At times Eden is a geographical location, like the fjordstet/eed the speaker travels to in a boat, where one can hear ``the fading archaic languages of earth.'' Eden also is the condition of fulfillment the speaker has achieved though love for her husband and sonson/daughter , the temporary paradise of her son's son's/daughter's childhood ? if you can--since child's childhood is awkward and the realm where language represents imagination. Thus Grosholz ( The River Painter ) sets forth her ars poetica : ``Part of the world persists / distinct from what we say, but part will stay / only if we keep talking: only speech / can re-create the gardens of the world.'' Accordingly, she ``keeps talking'' and winds all of ordinary life, including confessions and letters to and from friends, into the narrative. For the most part, the poems hold interest because the speaker is intelligent and generous, and because the verse stanzas lead to some interesting surprises, such as the statuary at Buttes Chaumont that is described as ``the faint / vanilla goddess.'' (May)
Library Journal - Library Journal
``Part of the world persists/ distinct from what we say, but part will stay/ only if we keep talking: only speech/ can re-create the gardens of the world.'' Gardens, both lived in and visited, can be expected to dominate a collection called Eden. Describing life through gardens, views from windows, and conversation, Grosholz puts herself in a tradition of women's poetry that defies current trends. Her poems are contemplative and philosophical, but in ways that can evoke a class-bound tradition of female solitude and leisure. Writing about the rare and evanescent, she can sometimes sound precious. Nonetheless, there is enchantment to be found in the detail with which Grosholz talks about the elusive parts of her world. For general collections.-- Rob Schmieder, Boston

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801843907
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication date:
02/28/1966
Series:
Poetry and Fiction Series
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
6.02(w) x 9.05(h) x 0.37(d)

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