Edgar Allan Poe's Tales of Mystery and Madness
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Edgar Allan Poe's Tales of Mystery and Madness

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by Edgar Allan Poe, Gris Grimly
     
 

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A sweet little cat drives a man to insanity and murder....
The grim death known as the plague roams a masquerade ball dressed in red....
A dwarf seeks his final revenge on his captors....
A sister calls to her beloved twin from beyond the grave....
Prepare yourself. You are about to enter a world where you will be shocked, terrified, and, though

Overview

A sweet little cat drives a man to insanity and murder....
The grim death known as the plague roams a masquerade ball dressed in red....
A dwarf seeks his final revenge on his captors....
A sister calls to her beloved twin from beyond the grave....
Prepare yourself. You are about to enter a world where you will be shocked, terrified, and, though you'll be too scared to admit it at first, secretly thrilled. Here are four tales — The Black Cat, The Masque of the Red Death, Hop-Frog, and The Fall of the House of Usher — by the master of the macabre, Edgar Allan Poe. The original tales have been ever so slightly dismembered — but, of course, Poe understood dismemberment very well. And he would shriek in ghoulish delight at Gris Grimly's gruesomely delectable illustrations that adorn every page. So prepare yourself. And keep the lights on.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Roger Corman Filmmaker, The Little Shop of Horrors The macabre beauty and sly wit of Gris Grimly's illustrated edition of some of Poe's best-loved tales are destined to capture the imagination of a generation new to the master of terror, as well as delight longtime admirers of Poe, who will find much to relish in this haunting interpretation.

Bernie Wrightson horror legend [Gris Grimly] captures the spirit of Poe in a fresh and classic way. Poe never looked so good.

Publishers Weekly
Gris Grimly applies his wicked pen to four of Edgar Allan Poe's Tales of Mystery and Madness: "The Black Cat," "The Masque of the Red Death," "Hop-Frog" and "The Fall of the House of Usher." The morbid and fearsome text makes an ideal match for Grimly's gothic aesthetic. His artwork runs the gamut from a comic book-like progression of the search for the black cat to a medical textbook-style visual analysis of Roderick Usher. (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
No one writes of the macabre in a more chilling vein than Edgar Allan Poe. These four selections, slightly abridged, include "The Black Cat," "The Masque of the Red Death," "Hop Frog," and, essential Poe, the "Fall of the House of Usher." Each story may be abbreviated in length, but each retains the essential intricate language, the chilling details, and the grotesque plots so terrifyingly penned by Poe. What sets this book apart from other Poe collections is its accessibility to those in middle school and its ghoulish and cadaverous illustration. The aptly named Gris Grimly renders these in pen and ink with watercolor. His style is reminiscent of Edward Gorey and he makes use of borders, and marginal drawings as well as full page illustrations to not only break up the ponderous text but to create the visual nightmares suggested by Poe's words. This is a fine introduction to the master of the gruesome. Better get several copies. This one won't be a shelf-sitter. 2004, Atheneum, Ages 12 to 14.
—Beverley Fahey
VOYA
Grimly again entertains with his wicked pen in this slightly abridged collection, enlivening some of Poe's most fearsome stories such as The Black Cat, The Masque of the Red Death, Hop-Frog, and The Fall of the House of Usher. The spidery ink drawings showcase Poe's characters with heavy-lidded eyes and brows, angular chins, pointy foreheads, and knobby knees. The one-eyed black cat in the opening story appears crazed, sinister, and ferocious at times. A new generation of readers will come to appreciate Poe's macabre work through the book's accessible format. The illustrations are frightening yet comical-and sometimes downright silly-enough to keep nightmares at bay. The font used to tell the tales will also entice younger readers, with dialogue that appears to be handwritten at times or just set in an alternative typeface. Screams can be seen howling across the background of a page, comic-book style. Overall this collection is delightful. Grimly's artwork is well suited to Poe and the abridgement works smoothly. VOYA CODES: 4Q 4P M J (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2004, Atheneum/S & S, 144p., Ages 11 to 15.
—Cynthia Grady
School Library Journal
Gr 6 Up-Grimly's deliciously malevolent illustrations are the perfect complement to Poe's macabre stories. Four of the writer's most popular tales are presented in an abridged format: "The Black Cat," "The Masque of the Red Death," "Hop-Frog," and "The Fall of the House of Usher." The watercolor and pen-and-ink artwork is populated with deftly drawn cartoon humans, animals, and other beings, many with grotesque or sinister expressions. The pictures cover, crisscross, or circle the margins of the pages and are often contained in ornate art-deco frames along with small blocks of text. Libraries needing an additional copy of Poe's writings should consider this one.-Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689848377
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
08/10/2004
Edition description:
Repackage
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
334,412
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was an American writer, poet, and critic. Best known for his macabre prose work, including the short story “The Tell-Tale Heart,” his writing has influenced literature in the United States and around the world.

Mr. Gris Grimly is as mysterious as Poe himself. What is known is that his own particular brand of creative brilliance was first seen in many books, including Monster Museum, The Cockatrice Boys, Pinocchio, Creature Carnival, Boris and Bella, and Gris Grimly's Wicked Nursery Rhymes. Then he found himself under the spell of Edgar Allan Poe, and, for years and years, was compelled to give a visual representation of Mr. Poe's ghoulish genius. This book is the result of his mania.

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4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was the book that started me on Edgar Allan Poe. Believe me, after you read this one, you won't be able to stop reading these short stories that center on the dark minds of man, woman, and child driven to insanity, hysteria and much more. Gris Grimly does a fine job of interpreting these thoughts and turning them into illustrations for the readers to enjoy and understand fully of the situations told in these stories. Sickly Brilliant!!!!!!!!!!!!
Carissa_Reyes More than 1 year ago
I think this book is a little over the top and is hard to understand at some points. I personally think that he should have added an analysis at the back of the book. Younger children may have a hard time understanding the book. Ex: In The Masque of the Red Death, the different rooms are the different stages of life. And in: The Fall of the House of Usher, one theory is that the sister might have been "dead" in life, while the brother was alive. But because he buried her alive, she came back to murder him, hence in his death, gave her life in her death. This may sound confusing, henceforth the analysis at the end of the book. Overall, this is quite an enjoyable book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although Poe can be a little creepy at times, this has to be one of the best books I have read. I found this in my school library and it was great! I strongly recomend this book.
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I used this book with my 8th graders. The illustrations are wonderful and the stories are true to form. The way the writing was broken up really helped my students to appreciate the stories in a new way. I recommend this book to all Poe fans.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
its very good my child she is in fourth grade and she loved it
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is humorous, as well as a guide to vocabulary development! Read this ultimately enamoring book!!