Edgar Cayce and the Urantia Book

Edgar Cayce and the Urantia Book

1.0 1
by John Bunker, Karen Pressler
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Updated with new information! A thorough examination of the evidence of a link between the sleeping prophet, Edgar Cayce, and The Urantia Book. For fifty years the channel for the Urantia Papers has remained a complete mystery. Speculation has suggested Wilfred Kellogg as a likely candidate, but evidence has never supported this theory. See the research and decide for…  See more details below

Overview

Updated with new information! A thorough examination of the evidence of a link between the sleeping prophet, Edgar Cayce, and The Urantia Book. For fifty years the channel for the Urantia Papers has remained a complete mystery. Speculation has suggested Wilfred Kellogg as a likely candidate, but evidence has never supported this theory. See the research and decide for yourself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780966977417
Publisher:
John Michael Bunker
Publication date:
06/01/2012
Pages:
260
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.55(d)

Meet the Author

John Bunker is a successful business owner. He discovered Edgar Cayce in 1994 and has been a serious student ever since. Karen works as a cataloger at their local public library. Their ongoing research can be found on their website where they are making available new translations of such ancient Egyptian texts as the Book of Amduat, the Book of Aker, the Book of Caverns, the Book of Gates and others. Follow their work at http://sites.google.com/site/edgarcayceandthehallofrecords

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
On the front flapcover of Edgar Cayce and The Urantia Book (ECTUB) one reads the following introductory statements: 'Until now, no one has had any factual idea as to how The Urantia Book came into existence. No human name has ever been attached to the book. Thus, the great mystery of the identity of the individual through whom the Urantia information was obtained has remained unsolved.' I'm sure Martin Gardner would object to this perfunctory dismissal of his book entitled Urantia: The Great Cult Mystery, in which he provides compelling evidence in support of his identification of the mysterious 'sleeping subject' through whom the Urantia revelations were allegedly transmitted by alleged celestial agents. While attempting to make a case for Edgar Cayce as the human conduit, ECTUB makes scant and apparently reluctant mention of Gardner's book and its conclusions. Case in point, consider the following excerpt: 'Many people believe that Wilfred Kellogg was the sleeping subject [Gardner's contention]. But [William] Sadler revealed that the sleeping subject was a married individual, when Sadler first encountered him. Kellogg was not married at the time The Urantia Book adventure began . . . . However, Cayce was married [at the time].' (ECTUB, p. 164) The only source I am aware of in which William Sadler (founder of the Urantia movement) discusses his initial encounter with the unnamed sleeping subject is the appendix to his 1929 book entitled The Mind at Mischief, in which the sleeping subject's marital status is not mentioned. ECTUB relies on a second-hand account, published in 1976, from a conversation that took place in 1941 to establish the sleeping subject's marital status at the time (see p. 217 of ECTUB). ECTUB relies on several other tenuous circumstances such as the number of visits Cayce had made to Chicago (the Urantia movement's city of birth) during the years in which the Urantia revelations were occurring. However, just because somebody can demonstrate that their grandfather made regular visits to the windy city during certain days of the summer months for several consecutive years does not prove that ol' grandpa pitched against the Cubs. Although some parallels may exist between Cayce and the sleeping subject regarding the mode of information transference and the alleged extra-dimensional context of the messages, too many stark contrasts overshadow ECTUB's hypothesis. For starters, Cayce was a strong advocate of reincarnation, whereas The Urantia Book (TUB) rejects such doctrine outright. Moreover, nowhere in the voluminous Cayce material is mention given of a vast celestial hierarchy such as that described in TUB. Are we to believe that the only time Cayce unwittingly channeled Urantia-specific material was when he was in Chicago? ECTUB apparently offers a less egregious candidate to choose from for those who feel uncomfortable with acknowledging Kellogg, brother-in-law to Sadler and fellow ex-Adventist (a sect from which many doctrines were liberally borrowed by the alleged celestial authors of TUB). It was an inside job, you see.