Edgar Huntly

Edgar Huntly

by Charles Brockden Brown, Anais 9000
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Charles Brockden Brown (1771-1810), author of Wieland, writes of madness, sleepwalking, and the Indian threat in the brilliant novel Edgar Huntly.

In the bleak night, beneath the stretching limbs of the shadowy elm, a shot rings out -- and the hurrying Edgar Huntly arrives to find his friend Waldegrave insensate and bleeding on the ground. Who could have murdered

Overview

Charles Brockden Brown (1771-1810), author of Wieland, writes of madness, sleepwalking, and the Indian threat in the brilliant novel Edgar Huntly.

In the bleak night, beneath the stretching limbs of the shadowy elm, a shot rings out -- and the hurrying Edgar Huntly arrives to find his friend Waldegrave insensate and bleeding on the ground. Who could have murdered such an honest, blameless man? Walking to his uncle's house on another gloomy night, Huntly succumbs to the impulse to revisit that fatal elm -- only to have the mystery around the murder deepen: for Huntly spies beneath the shadowed tree a robust, half-clad man digging in the earth -- and then falling to his knees and weeping! Themes include sleepwalking, morality and truth and Gothic fiction.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781601121523
Publisher:
Babblebooks
Publication date:
01/01/2008

Read an Excerpt


ture, that this person was asleep. Such instances were not unknown to me, through the medium of conversation and books. Never, indeed, had it fallen under my own observation till now, and now it was conspicuous and environed with all that could give edge to suspicion, and vigor to inquiry. To stand here was no longer of use, and I turned my steps toward my uncle's habitation. CHAPTER II. I Had food enough for the longest contemplation. My steps partook, as usual, of the vehemence of my thoughts, and I reached my uncle's gate before I believed myself to have lost sight of the Elm. I looked up and discovered the well known habitation. I could not endure that my reflections should so speedily be interrupted. I, therefore, passed the gate, and stopped not till I had reached a neighboring summit, crowned with chesnut-oaks and poplars. Here I more deliberately reviewed the incidents that had just occurred. The inference was just, that the man, half- clothed and digging, was a sleeper; but what was the cause of mis morbid activity9 What was the mournful vision that dissolved him in tears, and extorted from him tokens of inconsolable distress9 What did he seek, or what endeavor to conceal in this fatal spot9 The incapacity of sound sleep denotes a mind sorely wounded. It is thus that atrocious criminals denote the possession of some dreadful secret. The thoughts, which considerations of safety enable them to suppress or disguise during wakefulness, operate without impediment, and exhibit their genuine effects, when the notices of sense are partly excluded, and they are shut out from a knowledge of their entire condition. This is the perpetrator of some nefarious deed. What but the murderof Waldegrave could direct his steps hither 9 His employment was part of some fantastic dr...

Meet the Author

Charles Brockden Brown (1771-1810) is known for "Americanizing" the gothic tradition by shifting the settings of his works to American towns, forests, and estates while keeping a gothic mood of emotional and psychological extremity. As the first native author who adopted literature as a profession, his works include Alcuin: A Dialogue, Arthur Mervyn, Ormond, and Weiland.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >