The Edge of the World (Terra Incognita Series #1)

The Edge of the World (Terra Incognita Series #1)

4.0 27
by Kevin J. Anderson
     
 

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Terra Incognita - the blank spaces on the map, past the edge of the known world, marked only by the words "here be monsters."

Two nations at war, fighting for dominion over the world, pin their last hopes of ultimate victory on finding a land out of legend.

Each will send its ships to brave the untamed waters, wild storms, sea serpents, and darker dangers

Overview

Terra Incognita - the blank spaces on the map, past the edge of the known world, marked only by the words "here be monsters."

Two nations at war, fighting for dominion over the world, pin their last hopes of ultimate victory on finding a land out of legend.

Each will send its ships to brave the untamed waters, wild storms, sea serpents, and darker dangers unseen by any man. It is a perilous undertaking, but there will always be the impetuous, the brave, and the mad, willing to leave their homes to explore the unknown.

Even unto the edge of the world...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Having wound up his seven-volume space opera, the Saga of Seven Suns, bestseller Anderson moves hesitantly into fantasy with this uninspired series opener. A promising attempt to end a long history of war between the followers of Aiden and Urec, two of the sons of creator-god Ondun, is scuttled when an accidental fire engulfs the city of Ishalem, which occupies the isthmus separating the warring kingdoms. The repercussions of the blaze, which include massacres, betrayals and vicious reprisals, play out over the next 13 years as naval chartsmen guide the kingdoms' sailing ships through the treacherous waters around Ishalem. The details of the cultures and politics add little insight into human nature, and a paucity of fantasy elements gives readers no reason to prefer this tale over its numerous contemporaries. (June)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316004190
Publisher:
Orbit
Publication date:
05/01/2010
Series:
Terra Incognita Series, #1
Pages:
672
Sales rank:
758,761
Product dimensions:
4.30(w) x 6.82(h) x 1.41(d)

Meet the Author

Kevin J. Anderson has written 46 national bestsellers and has over 20 million books in print worldwide in 30 languages. He has been nominated for the Nebula Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and the SFX Readers' Choice Award. Find out more about Kevin Anderson at www.wordfire.com.

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The Edge of the World (Terra Incognita Series #1) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Jvstin More than 1 year ago
Kevin J Anderson is well known in SF circles for his "Saga of Seven Suns" SF series, and more visibly, for his extensions of the Dune universe written by Frank Herbert's son Brian. Here, in The Edge of the World, Kevin J Anderson tries something new--a fantasy novel. As it so happens this is the first novel of Anderson's I have read, and so I came into reading this novel unaware of first-hand knowledge of his writing styles and choices. The Edge of the World is billed as the first of the "Terra Incognita" series, and is set in a very low magic (lower than even, say, George R.R. Martin's Game of Thrones world) universe. The level of technology, aside from gunpowder, is pre-Renaissance, early Age of Exploration. And therein hangs the hook for his story. Two squabbling nations divided by different interpretations of a common origin myth find themselves, by bad luck and coincidence, drawn into a protracted religious-political conflict. In the meantime, both nations strive to explore the world beyond the continent that houses both Tierra and Uraba. There is a third, smaller, religious group that lives in both lands and tries to get along in the midst of the war. Although I am sure Anderson did not intend it, I got a Guy Gavriel Kay vibe from the parallels between his three factions and the Kindath, Asharites, and Jaddites. The book is divided into short chapters--over 110 in a 570 page volume. Plenty of POV characters in all three groups. Readers used to large casts and whiplash changes between POV characters will be familiar with the technique. Having weaned myself on Martin and Erikson, I didn't have a problem with the structure of the book. Too, many of the plot contrivances and coincidences seemed fine, if suitably tragic to continue to simmer and increase the conflict between the two nations. Characters show up and often die quickly, again, much like Martin and Erikson. However, I felt a couple of the twists and turns in the tale seemed like needless cruelty and not important to the overall plot. I didn't see their point and it was somewhat offputting. Also, while Anderson mostly does a good job to show that both sides in the religious-political conflict are capable of atrocity and evil, the finger does seem a bit on the scales to one side, at least to my perception. With those concerns aside, however, the Age of Exploration is an interesting time period in Earth's history, and Anderson captures it well in his fantasy universe. He's an accomplished writer, that comes across very well. And aside from some of the plot concerns, I was more than well satisfied with character development, growth and change. Anderson paints on a pretty big blank map (a metaphor used in the book) and I do want to see how the map fills in, especially given the discoveries made by characters from both nations in the novel. I am intrigued enough by the novel's strengths to want to continue to read the series, and perhaps eventually try his Saga of Seven Suns novels, too.
Gnomicron More than 1 year ago
I recently finished The Edge of the World by Kevin J. Anderson. Being a long time fan of this author, I do look forward to every one of his projects. I liked the Saga of Seven Suns series for its multitude of characters and the space opera setting. His DC Comics novels appeal to me because I am a long-time DC fan. The Dune books are good, because, while adding to the fabric of the Dune Universe, you also get a different type of storytelling than that of Frank Herbert. Edge of the World was a little different. When I first heard about this project, I was a little apprehensive. Religious wars between two nations? Not really my cup of tea. I was drawn into it mostly by the sense of adventure and wonder to see what's beyond the next sunrise. In this book, there are no definite "good guys" and "bad guys." As in life, there are extremists on both sides of the issue. It's for the reader to decide who is hero and who is villain. My favorite parts of this book did take place in and around the exploratory ship, the Luminara. I could have read a full book on just it's story alone. And that was only one of the journeys in the book. I liked the other one as well. I wish both could have lasted longer. I've also been enjoying the companion CD project by Roswell Six, Terra Incognita: Beyond the Horizon. I like the mix of ballads, duets and rock numbers based on a couple of storylines from the book. An incredible mix of talent went into this work. From lyrics by Anderson and his wife, to music by Eric Norlander and others. I'm hoping there will be another CD for at least the third novel in this trilogy. In closing, I'm looking forward to book number 2, The Map of All Things.
TexasJune More than 1 year ago
I am a big fan of Kevin Anderson and his Saga of the Seven Suns series and his co-authoring the Dune series. I WAS a little skeptical, of this book. I like to read space adventures. BUT... I had to try it, Kevin is one of my favorite authors after all. And I was not disappointed. The Edge of the World is a GREAT book. Lots of adventures, discoveries, romance (good and evil), little mistakes that turn into major war. This is a hard to put down book. I highly recommend it.
harstan More than 1 year ago
The war between the followers of the two Gods, Aiden and Urec, the sons of the creator, has been going on forever. Both nations have suffered from the constant battles and need for vigil. An inferno devastates the city of Ishalem that sits on the isthmus separating the two kingdoms. Each side blames the other for the disaster and back and forth reprisals heats up the hostilities over the next thirteen years. -------- Hope to end the conflict seems unlikely as massacres especially of civilians are the acceptable norm. Yet each nation decides victory is theirs if they are the first to find a legendary land on THE EDGE OF THE WORLD that hints of divine truths, which also means a dangerous sea race venturing into the treacherous sea beyond the isthmus.---------- The first Terra Incognita tale showcases Kevin J. Anderson's skills as he leaves outer space (see the Saga of Seven Suns) for an apparent fantasy saga. However, although there are hints of otherworldly elements, none surface so that the hostilities make the story line seem more like a historical military novel. Still the tale is engaging as Mr. Anderson begins to explore the causes of the conflict; hopefully in future entries he will go core deep into how the constant war impacts societies; as the fight rules these two nations.---------- Harriet Klausner
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Cool! Thats the word im looking for.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved it
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guyTX More than 1 year ago
I had never heard of Kevin J. Anderson before reading "The Edge of the World". While reading the book, I saw Anderson's name associated with Star Wars (which my family read/watched but I don't) and Dune (I read 4 or 5 books). I was immediately pulled into this book (The Edge...) and couldn't put it down. I read loads of fantasy and books meant for high school kids. True, there are some rather descriptive killing scenes in the book not worthy of reading or discussion within a school environment. Nonetheless, his imagination in creating those three different groups of people and their daily movement through time whether on land or water, well it does make one wonder how they were created. As a creative and imaginative person myself, I am pleased to read descriptions well beyond those I have made up. As soon as I see the followup book(s) extending this story, I am sure to purchase them.
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