Edith Wharton and the Making of Fashion

Edith Wharton and the Making of Fashion

by Katherine Joslin
     
 

ISBN-10: 1584657790

ISBN-13: 9781584657798

Pub. Date: 11/10/2009

Publisher: University of New Hampshire Press

Edith Wharton and the Making of Fashion places the iconic New York figure and her writing in the context of fashion history and shows how dress lies at the very center of her thinking about art and culture. The study traces American patronage of the Paris couture houses from Worth and Doucet through Poiret and Chanel and places Wharton’s characters in these

Overview

Edith Wharton and the Making of Fashion places the iconic New York figure and her writing in the context of fashion history and shows how dress lies at the very center of her thinking about art and culture. The study traces American patronage of the Paris couture houses from Worth and Doucet through Poiret and Chanel and places Wharton’s characters in these establishments and garments to offer fresh readings of her well-known novels. Less known are Wharton’s knowledge of and involvement in the craft of garment making in her tales of seamstresses, milliners, and textile workers, as well as in her creation of workshops in Paris during the First World War to employ Belgian and French seamstresses and promote the value of handmade garments in a world given to machine-driven uniformity of design and labor. Pointing the way toward further research and inquiry, Katherine Joslin has produced a truly interdisciplinary work that combines the best of literary criticism with an infectious love and appreciation of material culture.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584657798
Publisher:
University of New Hampshire Press
Publication date:
11/10/2009
Series:
Becoming Modern/Reading Dress
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
248
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction: Remnant and Meaning – “. . . the sweep and amplitude of the great artist’s stroke . . .”
Dressing Up – “. . . my newest Doucet dress . . . it was pretty . . .”
The Underside of Fashion – “. . . the utensils of their art . . .”
Philanthropy and Progress – “. . . thin shoulders in shapeless gingham . . .”
Desire in the Marketplace – “What you want is the home-made article.”
The Cut of a Gown – “Why not make one’s own fashions?”
Dressing for Middle Age – “—don’t try to make me look like a flapper.”
Democracy and Dress – “. . . ‘the American girl,’ the world’s highest achievement. . . .”
Conclusion: The Costume Side – “—the small rest!—will, I think, be interested in the ‘costume’ side . . .”
Notes
Bibliography
Index

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