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Edith's Diary
     

Edith's Diary

4.0 1
by Patricia Highsmith
 

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As Edith Howland's life becomes harsh, her diary entries only become brighter and brighter. She invents a happy life. As she knits for imaginary grandchildren, the real world recedes. Her descent into madness is subtle, appalling, and entirely believable.

Overview


As Edith Howland's life becomes harsh, her diary entries only become brighter and brighter. She invents a happy life. As she knits for imaginary grandchildren, the real world recedes. Her descent into madness is subtle, appalling, and entirely believable.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780871132963
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/1994
Series:
Highsmith, Patricia Series
Edition description:
1st Atlantic Monthly Press ed
Pages:
317
Sales rank:
524,134
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.26(h) x 0.86(d)

Meet the Author

Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) was an American author known for her novels of psychological suspense. She wrote over two dozen books and short story collections, including her five Tom Ripley novels. Her first book Strangers on a Train was nominated for an Edgar Award and was later adapted into a film by Alfred Hitchcock. Many of her works have been adapted for the screen, including The Talented Mr. Ripley and most recently The Price of Salt which was renamed Carol.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
January 19, 1921
Date of Death:
February 4, 1995
Place of Birth:
Fort Worth, Texas
Place of Death:
Locarno, Switzerland
Education:
B.A., Barnard College, 1942

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Edith's Diary 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was my introduction to Patricia Highsmith; I will be reading more. I took it along on a beach weekend and literally couldn't put it down--carried it to the breakfast table, etc. Why? Nothing much happens--an apparently happy couple grows apart, she is left with their creepy son and ailing uncle, she writes in her diary--but you slowly realize you're observing the unraveling of a woman's psyche. It's superbly done.